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Illustration on threatened government meddling in the private sector world of sports by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Jumping offsides on ‘Deflategate’

Super Bowl XLIX (49) will be played this Sunday. Sadly, the anticipated matchup between the AFC champion New England Patriots and NFC champion Seattle Seahawks has already had the wind knocked out of its sails — or, in this case, the air out of its footballs.

The Democratic assault on free speech

- The Washington Times

Everybody’s for free speech — until somebody says something he doesn’t like. But the genius of the First Amendment is that it is so direct and plain that even a lawyer or a judge can understand it.

Illustration on the Obama administrations role in Iranian nuclear ambitions by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Iran’s price for Obama’s coveted legacy

The importance of any political event is best measured against its opponents’ reactions. By that yardstick, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s agreement to speak about the dangers of Iran’s pursuit of nuclear weapons before a joint session of Congress is already enormously significant.

Illustration on American's diminished economic freedom by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Regaining lost economic freedom

If you were to rank all the countries of the world based on their level of economic freedom, you’d think the United States would be a shoo-in for first place, right? Surely we would be at least somewhere in the top five.

Illustration on the fall of Yemen by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Yemen’s collapse demonstrates Obama’s foreign policy failures

Last Tuesday night, President Obama assured the American people that their nation is secure because of his leadership. His “steady, persistent resolve,” Mr. Obama proclaimed in his State of the Union speech, has resulted in a “safer, more prosperous world.”

Illustration on corrupt reprisals from the IRS by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Payback from the IRS

The Internal Revenue Service’s woes did not begin or end with Lois Lerner and the agency’s targeting of political opponents with punitive action. Earlier this month we became painfully aware (again) that political games and punishing the taxpayer appear to be the burgeoning raison d’etre of the tax-collecting agency.

Illustration on the illusory nature of the economic recovery for the middle class by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama’s illusory economic recovery

The big news from this week’s State of the Union address is that the economic “crisis is over.” Apparently, we’ve been rescued from a second Great Depression and everything this president has done to fix the economy has worked. All that was missing from Mr. Obama’s celebration was the old “Icky Shuffle” end zone dance.

A woman waves a Greek flag during a speech by the leader of Syriza left-wing party Alexis Tsipras outside Athens University Headquarters, Sunday, Jan. 25, 2015. A triumphant Alexis Tsipras told Greeks that his radical left Syriza party's win in Sunday's early general election meant an end to austerity and humiliation and that the country's regular and often fraught debt inspections were a thing of the past. "Today the Greek people have made history. Hope has made history," Tsipras said in his victory speech at a conference hall in central Athens. (AP Photo/Fotis Plegas G.)

Now Greeks should dump the Euro

Since 2008, the Greek economy has shrunk by 25 percent, and the stock market is down more than 80 percent.

Illustration on school choice by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The steady progress of school choice

Sunday marked the start of National School Choice Week, an annual celebration of education reforms that give parents the power to pick the schools, public or private, that are best for their children.

Obama, General of the Free Army Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s Free Stuff Army

Fresh from offering “free” health care, “free” phones and “free” food to the masses, he’s upped the bribery to “free” community college tuition and “free” child care. It’s not that the Clintons oppose any of these; they just need to affect moderation in case Hillary runs for president and has to knock back boilermakers again with the good old boys in Pennsylvania taverns.

Illustration on success and college degrees by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Scott Walker’s real-life diploma

Without a college degree you can go on to create a computer empire like Dell, Microsoft and Apple, build an airline company like Jet Blue, found an organic food company like Whole Foods, or just become a run-of-the-mill tech nerd and create WordPress, DropBox, Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Spotify, Threadless or Pinterest. But some say you can’t be president of the United States.

Related Articles

Illustration on the dangers of proposed net neutrality action by the government by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Blunting a radical agenda at the FCC

When bureaucrats in the government think Congress isn't doing enough to push along an agenda, federal agencies still have the responsibility to regulate fairly and judiciously. But that's sometimes no fun. On President Obama's watch, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, for two examples, continue to merrily scoot around Congress to impose their own agendas.

Illustration on the need to awaken to the global Islamist threat by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A warning from the Paris attacks

The Islamic terror attack on the magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris was carried out by Muslim criminals who were apparently trained in Yemen.

Illegals in U.S. enrich Mexico

I hope no one is surprised that Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto so graciously offered to doctor the paperwork for millions of Mexican illegals to have the legal standing to enter the United States — without the approval of the U.S. government ("Mexican president offers Obama help with amnesty documents," Web, Jan. 6).

Gasoline Capitol Dome Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Washington’s gas tax guzzlers

Suddenly everyone in Washington wants a gas tax hike — apparently so that consumers don't save too much money at the pump. As prices keep falling, the politicians and the moochers in Washington want a piece of the action.

Christie Cowboys furor not news

People need to get over the fact that New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is a Cowboys fan ("Christie attends Cowboys game as guest, hugs owner," web, Jan. 5). So are people from all over the United States.

Reliving the life of a Seneca warrior

Jane Whitefield is unique in the annals of detective fiction. She is a throwback to a tribal world, still loyal to the beliefs of the Seneca Indians and still adhering to the call of a lost era. Thomas Perry has once again resurrected a remarkable character who seems imbued with a strange immortality and an unusual morality, and he is to be congratulated.

Federal regulations are intended to make everyone safer and healthier. But rules imposed without regard to cost can and often do inflict more pain than pleasure. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Regulating the regulators

Americans hear a welcome jingle of coins in their pockets when they pull away from the gasoline pumps, and that music might get a little louder in coming weeks. With the price at the pump now little more than $2 a gallon in most places, drivers can look forward to saving $75 billion in annual fuel costs. The open road never looked more inviting.

Korea Cyber Attack on Hollywood Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Preventing a 'cyber Pearl Harbor'

It took an attack by a nation-state on Hollywood to bring the threat of cyberattacks to the forefront of the Americans' consciousness, but we have been fighting this war for decades.

Republicans in Congress are rushing their own end-of-February deadline to try to halt President Obama's amnesty program. But with Mr. Obama holding veto power, it's more likely his policy gets decided in the courts, and the Texas case is one of several where the president's amnesty is under scrutiny. (Associated Press)

Flimsy facts in the economic road show

Arule sometimes attributed to 19th century British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli says there are three falsehoods used to support a weak case in government: "Lies, damned lies and statistics."

Jaime Rodas and his daughter, Aria Rodas 3 enjoy an afternoon of sledding on Tuesday Jan. 6, 2015 on a hill in Jim Barnett Park in Winchester, Vvaa. (AP Photo/The Winchester Star, Ginger Perry)

Rough sledding

Winter, with its ice, snow and slush, doesn't offer many rewards — unless you're a kid with a sled, or an old inner tube or a big piece of cardboard. Then you can slide toward heaven, where, if you're lucky, a big pot of hot chocolate awaits in Mom's toasty kitchen.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. (Associated Press)

Obama should stand tall to Islam

The radical Muslims who are making war on the world are confident they can win, destroy religious and ethical beliefs and cultures different from their own, and impose a worldwide caliphate.

Rep. Robert Aderholt, Alabama Republican, has introduced legislation to counter President Obama's executive amnesty proposal. (Robert Aderholt)

Push-back legislation against executive amnesty from Robert Aderholt and Steve King gains momentum

- The Washington Times

While the opening dramas of the 114th Congress played out, one Alabama Republican was in action mode: Rep. Robert Aderholt quickly introduced the "Repeal Executive Amnesty Act," directed at President Obama's executive amnesty proposal, an idea that has irked conservatives for many weeks. And Rep. Robert Aderholt's legislation is gaining momentum - including an endorsement from Sen. Jeff Sessions, also from Alabama.

ATSC standard protects consumers

In "TV digital streaming technology speeds past FCC License rule" (Web, Jan. 1) it is not clear whether op-ed writer Andrew Langer's intention is to argue for a change in law or to malign MPEG LA with incorrect and misleading information. Although the former — whether over-the-air broadcast TV services should be freely accessible through every TV set sold in the United States — may be a subject of fair debate, the latter is deceitful and irresponsible.

France weighs the tragic cost of appeasement

The attack on the offices and staff of the French satirical paper, Charlie Hebdo, by three heavily armed men shouting out the name of God in Arabic is nothing less than a declaration of war by hordes of heathen barbarians against the civilized world. They would want us to think that they are acting in the name of God.

Illustration on aspirants to the presidency by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The presidential look in the mirror

The race for the presidency never ends. More than a few politicians lusting after a desk in the Oval Office begin planning years and even decades in advance for the day when they'll get their shot.

Mario Cuomo            Associated Press photo

Nixon, Cuomo and me

One summer morning in 2009, my cellphone beeped with a message. The voice at the other end was deep, resonant, authoritative but friendly.

Bess Myerson, Miss America 1945             Associated Press photo

Bess Myerson, first Jewish Miss America, dies at 90

Bess Myerson, whose death at age 90 was revealed this week, was a Miss America who lived through nearly a century of change in the perception of "the ideal American woman." She paid for celebrity in the way many celebrities before and after her paid. She was crowned in 1945, when the Miss America Pageant was taken more seriously than it is today, and she was anything but the typical "queen of femininity."