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Barack Obama      Associated Press photo

Rough justice for Obama and the Saudis

- The Washington Times

Throwing a stone at Saudi Arabia, where stoning women is the national sport, is great fun, and nobody deserves an occasional stoning like the Saudis, just to let the king and his legion of princes know how it feels.

Illustration on the undermining of the Hyde Amendment by Linas GArsys/The Washington Times

The life-saving amendment

Today marks 40 years since the life-saving Hyde Amendment was first enacted. This annual appropriations amendment stops taxpayer dollars from being used to fund most abortions and abortion coverage through government programs like Medicaid.

A Complete Takeover Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

ISIS in the Middle East and now here

A comprehensive strategy to defeat Islamic supremacists must include not only a war plan to defeat the enemy on the active battlefields of the Middle East, but it must also address how to defeat this enemy now inside the United States.

Illustration contrasting the media vetting of candidates Obama and Trump by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A biased media in action

- The Washington Times

If Donald Trump becomes the next president of the United States he’ll be more thoroughly vetted by the media than Barack Obama.

FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012 file photo, smoke rises over Saif Al Dawla district, in Aleppo, Syria. Residents in the rebel-held districts of Aleppo have a reprieve from the incessant bombings by Syrian government warplanes and the promise of an end to the crippling siege that has left produce stalls bare. (AP Photo/ Manu Brabo, File)

Vladimir Putin’s bombings

Donald Trump, who has been Vladimir Putin’s chief U.S. apologist, remains strangely mute about the rising death toll caused by Russian airstrikes on Syrian hospitals and other civilians in Aleppo.

Madison Gesiotto, Miss Ohio 2014, also writes the 'Millennial Mindset' column for The Washington Times.

Why I’m a Miss USA competitor supporting and inspired by Donald Trump

The stage lights burned brightly. An audience of thousands stretched out into the dark recesses of the arena. I was standing on the Miss USA stage, a dream come true for so many young women and an incredible memory that I will treasure for years to come. But, an even greater experience that stemmed from my time at Miss USA was my time with Donald Trump.

Illustration on Israel's nuclear strategy in light of use of nuclear weapons by other actors by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

On the eve of new atoms

The first post-World War II employment of nuclear weapons will probably be launched by North Korea or Pakistan. Should circumstances actually turn out this way, the resultant harms would impact not only the aggressor state and its victims, but also selected strategic nuclear policies in certain other states. The most significant example of such an impact would likely be Israel.

A Bangladeshi rickshaw transports a passenger in Old Dhaka, Bangladesh, Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016. Rickshaws are the most popular means of public transport in Dhaka. (AP Photo/A.M.Ahad)

Restoring free trade with Bangladesh

Since achieving independence in 1971, Bangladesh has been a strong friend and ally of the United States. Once defined by humanitarian help and development support, the relationship between the United States and Bangladesh is now firmly based on bilateral trade and investment. Today, Bangladeshi products find their way into virtually every American household.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016, in Melbourne, Fla. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Voting for growth

Voters must shake up Washington if they want a more prosperous future.

FILE - In this Saturday, Aug. 13, 2016 file photo, a soldier from the 1st Battalion of the Iraqi Special Operations Forces listens to an address by his commander after a training exercise to prepare for the operation to re-take Mosul from Islamic State militants, in Baghdad, Iraq. The disparate groups that make up Iraq's security forces are converging on the city of Mosul, lining up for a battle on the historic plains of northern Iraq that is likely to be decisive in the war against the Islamic State group(AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo, File)

What to do when a ‘narrative war’ fails

Apologies to White House spokesman Josh Earnest, who this week claimed we are in a “narrative war” with the Islamic State, or ISIS, but here’s the only narrative that the current crop of jihadists will understand: “When I am president of the United States, I will be eager and able to unleash on you history’s biggest, baddest collection of warriors, and should you choose to oppose them on the battlefield, they will kill you and break your stuff. Guaranteed.”

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's bellicose attitude by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When the Donald is the dove

It’s interesting when a longtime Democrat and long-ago speechwriter for John and Robert Kennedy declares he will vote for Donald Trump. That’s what Adam Walinsky did in Politico Magazine the other day. It’s even more interesting when hostile Democrats rush to defend Hillary Clinton from Mr. Walinsky’s attack, as Peter Beinart did in an article in The Atlantic calling Mr. Walinsky’s piece an “absurd and dishonest essay.”

Egg Shell Helmet Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Inmates’ defective work

A scathing report of a joint investigation by the Justice Department’s Inspector General and the Defense Criminal Investigative Service found that the Bureau of Prisons’ Federal Prison Industries (FPI) produced more than 100,000 combat helmets that were defective and would “likely cause serious injury or death to the wearer.”

Fresh Start Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The human face of overcriminalization

A young man from a low-income family sells small amounts of marijuana when real opportunity eludes him. He’s arrested and incarcerated several times. After being convicted and serving his sentence, he leaves prison with a record that will follow him for the rest of his life.

Related Articles

Illustration on the relative character of the two presidential candidates by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trading places in the homestretch

What an opportunity Hillary Clinton missed with her talk about "basket cases." She blew a chance to broaden empathy for the unhappy, dissatisfied, disenchanted voters who find Donald Trump's message of strength, making America great again, important and crucial.

Illustration on the co-option of the FBI and Justice Department over the Hillary email investigation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

What is the FBI hiding?

Earlier this week, Republican leaders in both houses of Congress took the FBI to task for its failure to be transparent. In the House, it was apparently necessary to serve a subpoena on an FBI agent to obtain what members of Congress want to see, and in the Senate, the chairman of the Judiciary Committee accused the FBI itself of lawbreaking.

Journalist Katie Couric poses for a portrait to promote the film, "Under the Gun", at the Toyota Mirai Music Lodge during the Sundance Film Festival on Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016 in Park City, Utah. (Photo by Matt Sayles/Invision/AP)

Katie Couric's anti-gun agenda could cost her $12 million

In January, Epix released 'Under the Gun,' a documentary directed and narrated by Katie Couric, which is self-described on its website as one that "examines the events and people who have kept the gun debate fierce and the progress slow, even as gun deaths and mass shootings continue to increase."

Hillary Clinton later said she regretted saying that half of Donald Trump's supporters held racist, xenophobic or other "irredeemable" qualities, though Republicans buoyed by tightening poll numbers say the slip-up will haunt Democrats down the homestretch. (Associated Press)

Hillary Clinton's murky drama

The big political story is, of course, Hillary Clinton's collapse at the Sept. 11 memorial in New York City on Sunday. While her health is a serious matter, the real story is how this debacle happened in the first place and how we learned about it.

'Deplorables' may not forgive

Before Hillary Clinton castigates Donald Trump's supporters as a "basket of deplorables," perhaps she should take a closer look at her own political base as well as her own political machine — not to mention her candor and the Clinton Foundation ("Hillary Clinton backpedals as 'deplorables' threatens to become her own '47% moment,'" Web, Sept. 11).

Clinton's corrupt history

Hillary Clinton has serious problems when it comes to transparency and character. She sent classified emails over nonsecure channels. She was involved in the Whitewater/Madison Guaranty Savings and Loan scandal.

Democratic vice presidential candidate, Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va. gestures as he arrives for a campaign rally at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Mich., Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2016. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Roosting with Hillary's chickens

Hillary Clinton's pneumonia, being of the bacterial and not the viral persuasion, is apparently not contagious. It's safe to shake her hand and share a cough. But the panic afflicting the Democrats is clearly contagious. Panic is Hillary's most obvious contribution to the 2016 race. She sees handwriting on the wall, and it's a warning writ large that something is gaining on her.

Illustration on the Papal view of materialism, religious ideology and violence by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The end of ideology?

Historical materialism, a theory popularized by Karl Marx and further developed and refined by others, holds that humanity progresses through stages to a class-free society. For Marxists, the course of history is best appreciated through a scientific lens, with class struggle inevitably leading to a communist future.

The cost of better gas mileage

The roadside cross, displaying a name, perhaps plastic flowers and sometimes a teddy bear attached with duct tape, is a symbol of the broken hearts left behind by someone who died on that spot. After years of declining traffic fatalities, the number of lives lost on the nation's roads and highways is rising again.

The Fargo VA Medical Center in Fargo, seen Thursday, April 2, 2015, is the main hospital for the North Dakota VA health care system, which includes community-based outpatient clinics in Bismarck, Devils Lake, Dickinson, Grafton, Grand Forks, Jamestown, Minot and Williston. In an analysis of six months of appointment data at 940 VA hospitals and clinics nationwide from September 2014 to February 2015, The VA medical system in North Dakota has managed to keep appointments for most military veterans on a timely schedule, despite the challenge of recruiting doctors to the mostly rural state. (AP Photo/Dave Kolpack)

A prescription for better veterans' medical care

When a 12-month-old boy arrived at a rural Arizona emergency room last year, a nurse practitioner diagnosed his life-threatening infection. The child desperately needed intravenous fluids, but the available doctors were not trained in an advanced ultrasound technique used to place a life-saving IV line called a "central line" into his tiny arm and leg veins.

Good Judge Bad Judge Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A Clinton win would ensure the most liberal Supreme Court in 80 years

The outcome of this November's election will determine the direction of the Supreme Court for a generation. The next president will have at least one, and as many as four or five, vacancies to fill. There is no more important issue in this election than the Supreme Court.

Illustration on the US/Turkey alliance by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Turkey's critical anti-terror role

As the global fight against terrorism continues, Turkey has become America's most critical geopolitical ally in the fight against the Islamic State and other dangerous terrorist organizations.