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The Internal Revenue Service Headquarters (IRS) building is seen in Washington on April 13, 2014. Unscrupulous tax preparers are using President Obama's health care law as a ploy to pocket bogus fines from unsuspecting taxpayers, including some immigrants not bound by the law's requirements, the IRS warned March 13, 2015. (Associated Press)

Ax the income tax

The most efficient solution would junk income taxes altogether in favor of a simple national sales tax.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, waves to members of the audience before speaking at an event hosted by the Center for American Progress (CAP) and the America Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), Monday, March 23, 2015, in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

They’re ready for Hillary, but is Hillary ready?

- The Washington Times

The Syndicate convened the Bilderberg Group, the Council on Foreign Relations, the Illuminati and the Vast Right-Wing Conspiracy over the weekend at a secret hideaway in downtown Shangri-la to talk about themes for the 2016 campaign.

Trust but verify illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When even ‘trust but verify’ won’t do

If the United States cannot verify that Iran isn’t developing nuclear weapons, then President Obama swears he won’t strike a deal with Tehran. This week, though, he seems hell-bent on doing precisely that, despite lingering questions about Iranian cheating. It is enough to drive a good man to distraction. Former United Nations Ambassador John Bolton even argued in an editorial last week that we should bomb Iran ourselves before the Israelis beat us to the punch.

Illustration on the death of Terri Schiavo by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Terri Schiavo’s inconvenient life

I spent the night of March 30, 2005, in a Florida hospice. I was at the bedside of Terri Schiavo during the last 14 hours of her earthly life, right up until five minutes before her death. During that time with Terri, joined by her brother and sister, I told Terri over and over that she had many friends around the country, many people who were praying for her and were on her side. I told her the same thing during my visits to her in the months before her feeding tube was removed. I am convinced she understood.

Lifting the covers on ‘Obamoogle’

During this past week as we’ve been swamped with bad news pouring out of every corner of the globe, it wouldn’t be surprising if you missed one of the more shocking revelations about White House actions that would make even Richard Nixon blush.

Chart to accompany Moore article March 30, 2015

Not hard at work but hardly working

The great conundrum of the U.S. economy today is that we have record numbers of working-age Americans out of the labor force at the same time we have businesses desperately trying to find workers. For example, the American Transportation Research Institute estimates there are about 35,000 trucker jobs that could be filled tomorrow if workers would take these jobs — a shortage that could rise to 240,000 by 2022.

Phasing out renewable energy illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Pulling the plug on renewable energy

There is never a good time for bad public policy. For few policies is this more evident than renewable energy mandates (REM), variously known as renewable portfolio standards, alternative energy standards and renewable energy standards.

Illustration on Putin's designs on eastern Europe BY Kevin Kreneck/Tribune Content Agency

Russia’s grab for its neighbors

A bipartisan consensus is emerging that the United States should do more to address Russia’s continuing aggression against Ukraine. But Russian revanchism does not begin or end with Ukraine, nor are “little green men” its only foreign policy instrument. Moscow is actively engaged in subversive activities along Europe’s eastern flank, targeting the region’s economic and political stability. As Central European capitals grow increasingly concerned, Washington urgently needs to demonstrate its robust commitment not just to the region’s security but to its democratic future.

Shiite rebels, known as Houthis, wearing an army uniform, ride on an armed truck to patrol the international airport in Sanaa, Yemen, Saturday, March 28, 2015. Yemen's President Abed Raboo Mansour Hadi, speaking at an Arab summit in Egypt on Saturday, called Shiite rebels who forced him to flee the country "puppets of Iran," directly blaming the Islamic Republic for the chaos there and demanding airstrikes against rebel positions continue until they surrender. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed)

Why Yemen matters

Thoughts on the shifting dynamics in the Middle East.

President Barack Obama speaks about payday lending and the economy, Thursday, March 26, 2015, at Lawson State Community College in Birmingham, Ala.  (AP Photo/Butch Dill)

Barack Obama’s love bomb offensive

- The Washington Times

President Obama says Rudy Giuliani was wrong. He does, too, love America. That’s good enough for me. He says he’s a Christian, despite his constant love bombs for Islam, and if that’s good enough for God it’s good enough for me, too. Conversations between believers and the Almighty are confidential, and have yet to be cracked by the National Security Agency (but we can be sure they’re working on it).

Obamacare in a death spiral illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obamacare flying machine begins a death spiral

The Supreme Court decision in King v. Burwell, the case challenging the Obama administration’s decision to award tax credits for health insurance sold through federally established exchanges, could turn on the question of whether a ruling that ends the tax credits on federal exchanges might cause something known as a “death spiral” in health insurance markets.

Warren’s pitchfork brigade skewers the facts

Ted Cruz’s announcement this week that he’s running for president has officially kicked off the 2016 primary season and has put the pressure on other potential GOP candidates to declare. On the Democratic side of the scrum there is Elizabeth Warren, whom progressives hope is the candidate-in-waiting to lead their pitchfork brigade against the “1 percent.” While it’s still unclear whether Mrs. Warren will announce, it’s assured that her income inequality position will drive a major plank in the eventual Democratic nominee’s platform.

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Just-cut stacks of $100 bills make their way down the production line at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing's Western Currency Facility in Fort Worth, Texas, on Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2013. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

Billionaires? The world has 1,826 of them - and 541 live in America

- The Washington Times

There’s lots of billionaires out there — 1,826, to be exact, according to recent painstaking research of Forbes magazine. Mote than a third prefer the urbane and urban life, and the Big Apple is the town of choice. The publication says that with 78 resident billionaires, New York City has the largest uber-rich population on the planet. But wait, there’s more.

Illustration on the funding of green anti-oil campaigns by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Overseas money buys more than just Hillary

The news that several foreign governments, including Saudi Arabia, gave millions to the Clinton Foundation, including donations while Hillary Clinton was secretary of state, has riled up Republicans. But if congressional Republicans want to hold hearings, they shouldn't limit the subject to Hillaryland. Foreign money isn't exclusive to the Clintons, and it may be coming into more serious play in influencing U.S. energy policy.

A before and after facelift on a 67-year-old man. (ASAPS photo)

'Dramatic' increase: Plastic surgery for men up by 43 percent as they compete in the job market

- The Washington Times

The vanity business appears is flourishing. The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery announced Thursday that Americans spent over $12 billion on assorted procedures in 2014. One sector is on the increase. "More men are turning to aesthetic cosmetic procedures, with dramatic increases seen in both surgical and nonsurgical options over the past 5 years and a 43 percent increase overall," the organization stated.

A Likely Exhibit at the Obama Presidential Library Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A presidential library for Obama's fairy tales

Sometime this month, the Barack Obama Foundation will likely announce the specific site of the president's library. It's expected to be in Chicago, but that's not the big news. Rather, the 14th presidential library, like the 44th occupant of the White House, will probably be the most controversial because it will stray so far from the aims of the original one begun by Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1939. At that time, FDR donated his personal and presidential papers to the federal government, even pledging part of his estate in Hyde Park, New York, for the site.

Crossing the aisle — and their fingers

The 2014 midterm election is now historic not for the margin of victory, but for the magnitude of GOP betrayal. The newly elected and empowered GOP-controlled House and Senate hold nearly as much contempt for the Constitution as they seem to hold for their voters, embracing ignominy more quickly than their broken campaign promises.

Unidentified military personnel walk along a causeway near Navarre Beach, Fla. Wednesday, March 11, 2015 as they search for survivors of an Army Black Hawk helicopter that went down Tuesday evening with 11 service members aboard.  (AP Photo/Northwest Florida Daily News, Devon Ravine)

Black Hawk down

While the Senate Foreign Relations Committee was inquiring Wednesday into President Obama's request for authorization to use military force against the Islamic State, or ISIS, a more immediate drama about a military force was playing out over the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of northwest Florida.

Illustration on Federal court incursions on individual liberties by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Saving Obamacare with supreme hypocrisy

At last week's Supreme Court oral arguments on the Affordable Care Act, several justices questioned whether a verdict against Obamacare would be "unconstitutionally coercive" to state governments that did not create health care exchanges. Justice Sonia Sotomayor fretted that such a ruling could result in "intruding on the federal-state relationship." The Supreme Court is sometimes hypersensitive about the rights of state governments at the same time it rubber-stamps the destruction of the rights of private citizens.

President-elect Barack Obama (left) stands with Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, D-N.Y., after announcing that she is his choice as Secretary of State during a news conference in Chicago on Dec. 1, 2008. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Obama and the Clinton emails

Hillary Rodham Clinton, the former first lady, U.S. senator from New York and secretary of state, used a private email server for all of her emails when she was President Obama's secretary of state from 2009 to 2013.

A sign warns motorists of the presence of a red light camera in Chicago. Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel's administration on Sunday, March 8, 2015 announced 50 controversial red-light cameras will be taken down from about two dozen locations citywide. The move comes as the former White House chief of staff seeks re-election and faces questions about the cameras impact on safety. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green, File)

Chicago's red-light rip-off

Rahm Emanuel is in big trouble in Chicago, having abused the residents in ways that should be a warning to politicians everywhere. The mayor, a former adviser to both Bill Clinton and Barack Obama, is not everyone's cup of breakfast tea. Everyone agrees that he's arrogant, high-handed and quick to scorn anyone with whom he disagrees. He couldn't get the 50 percent of the vote in the first primary and now the mayor is in a death struggle with a man who was written off early as a candidate with no chance. The machine, built by Richard Daley and nurtured by his son, was once invincible, and Mr. Emanuel has continued to wring money from those doing business with the city.

Hillary Rodham Clinton answers questions at a news conference at the United Nations, Tuesday, March 10, 2015.   Clinton conceded that she should have used a government email to conduct business as secretary of state, saying her decision was simply a matter of "convenience." (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

E-gate epidemics

Former CIA Director David Petraeus plea-bargained to a misdemeanor count of unauthorized removal and retention of classified material after having given classified government information to his onetime mistress, Paula Broadwell. How was Gen. Petraeus' transgression uncovered? By exposure of a nongovernment email account that he had set up with to communicate with Ms. Broadwell free of CIA scrutiny.

Green tipped M855 ammunition and an SIG brace    The Washington Times

One bullet makes a difference — to freedom

The announcement this week that the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) has at least temporarily abandoned plans to ban ammunition was welcome news not just to the more than 4 million Americans who own and use the AR-15 and rifles like it, but to the rest of us as well.

Hillary Rodham Clinton answers questions at a news conference at the United Nations, Tuesday, March 10, 2015.   Clinton conceded that she should have used a government email to conduct business as secretary of state, saying her decision was simply a matter of "convenience."  (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

The saboteur of Hillary’s ambitions

Hillary Clinton has been a reflection of the changing images of women in America for decades. She's had more reincarnations than Shirley MacLaine, more fashion makeovers than Cher, more comebacks from bad press than Madonna. The images always need updating. She's the life-size balloon toy, weighted at the bottom, that a child smacks over and watches with surprise and suspicion when it bobs back upright.

Understanding the heir to the throne

Time magazine journalist Catherine Mayer is an experienced observer and chronicler of Britain's royal family. In the course of several cover stories on Queen Elizabeth II and her family, she has traveled with and — to the extent that any journalist can — interacted with them. But for this book, she had to walk a tightrope in order to gain sufficient access to the enigmatic and unpredictable heir to the throne, while still maintaining her objectivity and, consequently, her all-important credibility

Republicans, keep promise to voters

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Kentucky Republican, continues to capitulate to President Obama and Sen. Harry Reid because he doesn't want to chance Republicans being held responsible for any government shutdown. He has done this for the budget and declared he will do it again for raising the debt ceiling. Mr. McConnell neglects to recall, apparently, the November 2014 election results that put Republicans in charge of the House and the Senate.

Obamacare unsalvageable

The March 4 article "Supreme Court tries to make sense of poorly drafted Obamacare language" (Web) reflects the fundamental problem with the entire Obamacare process, not just the issue currently before the Supreme Court. Poor language? No, Obamacare is poorly understood, specified and designed.