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President Donald Trump boards Air Force One at Morristown Municipal airport, Sunday, Sept. 24, 2017, in Morristown, N.J. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Critics call Trump ‘self-interested’ like it’s a bad thing

- The Washington Times

As a businessman, a builder and a real estate tycoon in the most fiercely competitive real estate market on the planet, President Trump has spent his entire life exercising his own considerable self-interest. He built a huge and admirable fortune trying to make a buck for himself.

Illustration on the rise of materialism and anti-religious bigotry on Capitol Hill by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hate, Bernie style

Two remarkable things unfolded last week. The Democrats openly embraced socialism in the form of single-payer health care. And they announced a secular, anti-Christian test for public office. The two go together like Abbott and Costello. Or better yet, since this is far from funny, Marx and Lenin.

Illustration on CIA use of drones by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The CIA’s drones fly into a storm

The Central Intelligence Agency’s authority to use lethal force is usually discussed only in the quietest corners of the intelligence community. These authorities are usually implemented pursuant to carefully-prescribed top-secret “presidential determinations” that authorize specific actions.

Justin Kandor Causing Trouble in New Hampshire Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Some New Hampshire candor about Jason Kander

Let America Vote founder Jason Kander is a smirking menace. The former Missouri secretary of state wants to come to New Hampshire, cast aspersions on our elections, and use his wokeness as a springboard to bigger things.

George McGovern. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The sad tale of two stumbling parties

- The Washington Times

We’ve heard the words and music of this song before. The hoariest cliche in American politics, presented as accomplished fact by every wise head in academe and media after every wipe-out election, is that the losing party is finished. Kaput. Destroyed. Done for. Dead, as in the graveyard.

Royhingya refugees from Myanmar receiving food from Bangladeshi aid workers          Associated Press photo

A refugee emergency and the terrorism it breeds

Bangladesh has been a haven for the Rohingya people since they began fleeing unprovoked oppression in their home state of Rakhine on Myanmar’s western shore, bordering Bangladesh, in 2015. Denied citizenship in their own country, the Rohingya have been in conflict not only with the other citizens of Rakhine but also with the government of Myanmar, which considers many of them to be anti-government insurgents. The United Nations describes the Rohingya as one of the world’s most persecuted people.

Trump's Door and Wall Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

MAGA and DACA

What does it mean to ‘Make America Great Again’? That’s a seemingly simple question with no simple answer, but an important part of it is certainly fixing our broken systems.

Illustration on possible solutions to the North Korea situation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump, the statesman, at the U.N.

President Trump is right. His speech at the United Nations was his third act of Reagan-like statesmanship, after the historically accurate, morally rooted and inspirational speeches in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and Warsaw, Poland. This time, he pointedly spoke for those who cannot speak in Iran, North Korea, Venezuela, and suppressed people around the world. It was a tour de force, and it’s hard to disagree with any word. Once again, Ronald Reagan would be nodding.

Illustration on Russia's attacks on Ukraine by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

Taking Putin seriously

President Trump mentioned the word sovereignty 21 times in his address to the United Nations Tuesday, but said little about Russia’s efforts to seize parts of Ukraine, piece by piece, and threaten other neighboring states.

In this June 2, 2017, file photo, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt speaks to the media during the daily briefing in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

Scott Pruitt, in fight for EPA life — literally

- The Washington Times

Scott Pruitt, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, has apparently generated so much controversy that radical green peeps are threatening him with near-regularity, to the point he’s now getting extra armed protection. Seriously, folks, some perspective, please. Are trees that important?

Angst of the Loser Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The perennial taste of sour grapes

On her current book tour, Hillary Clinton is still blaming the Russians (among others) for her unexpected defeat in last year’s presidential election. She remains sold on a conspiracy theory that Donald Trump successfully colluded with Russian President Vladimir Putin to rig the election in Mr. Trump’s favor.

Related Articles

A view of the Florida Keys during the aftermath of Hurricane Irma, Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. (Matt McClain/The Washington Post via AP, Pool)

Christians beat FEMA, and in so doing, tame Big Government

- The Washington Times

Faith-based groups -- Christian nonprofits, specifically -- have been busy bees of late, providing more aid to hurricane victims than even FEMA, the federal agency that's supposed to swoop to the scenes of natural disasters, assess the situation and speed the recovery and rebuilding process. Just goes to show: Where charity exists, government is not needed.

Illustration on corruption in Italy's support of refugees by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Mafia and the migrants

I spotted them on my way to dinner with a friend near Castel Gandolfo. They are migrants from Africa, sitting by the side of the road outside a "temporary" residence that, for many, appears to have become permanent. They all have cellphones. They all seem oblivious to us as we pass by.

Myk Londino, manager of Vape O2, blows a plume of smoke at his shop in Philadelphia. An E Hookah is in the foreground. (Charles Fox/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP)

Tax reform for businesses outside the corporate category

Corporate America's interest in tax reform is obvious and understandable. Similarly, politicians' interest in boosting our economy through incentives and breaks for large employers is not a mystery.

Illustration on U.S. vigilance against terrorism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Preventing another 9/11

How appropriate that this year's Sept. 11 anniversary should occur as Hurricane Irma continued to wreak havoc in Florida.

Illustration on the BRAC amendment in Congress by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The wrong time to close bases

As Americans, we are facing a grave threat -- one that goes beyond North Korea's missile tests, Russian aggression in Eastern Europe and the rise of ISIS.

Illustration on China's OBER projects by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The duplicitous purpose of 'One Belt, One Road'

"President Xi Jinping's proposal of 'One Belt, One Road' is the most significant and far-reaching initiative that China has ever put forward," wrote influential Chinese Ambassador Wu Jianmin in a 2015 China-U.S. Focus article. Despite official efforts to present OBOR as just an Eurasian economic development initiative, it is a steppingstone to making China a global power. The United States should offer a revived Trans-Pacific Partnership as a superior alternative for Asia's development.

In this undated photo provided on Monday, Sept. 11, 2017 by Hellas Gold company, an aerial view of a gold mine complex in Skouries, in the Halkidiki peninsula, northern Greece. Canadian mining company Eldorado Gold on Monday threatened to suspend a major investment in Greece in ten days, accusing the government of delaying permits and licenses. (Hellas Gold via AP)

A surprising solution to illegal immigration

As Western states prove incapable of deporting their millions of illegal migrants -- the current crisis features Italy -- authorities in Greece have found a surprising and simple way to convince them to take the long route back home.

Illustration on Paul Ryan's predicament by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Paul Ryan problem

It is tough to play hardball with your friends. Have you ever known someone who was exceptionally smart, very personable and highly accomplished, but was not particularly good at managing a large number of independently minded people? I have. His name is Paul Ryan.

An honest accounting of a skillful tactician

At a time when our history books and biographies are being revised at warp speed by practitioners of identity politics and a generation of academics fearful of being accused of being politically incorrect and losing their jobs, Craig Shirley stands out as an honest and highly talented biographer who is also a man of conviction.

Addy Valdez, 12, holds her cousin, Jasmine, while her family starts to clean up the damage from Hurricane Irma in Everglades City, Fla., Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. (Katie Klann/Naples Daily News via AP)

Disasters and dopes

Disaster comes in a variety of heartbreaking shapes and sizes, all of them unwelcome. Some, like global warming, are the work of nature; others are man-made. A little bit of rationality is all it takes to figure out which is which. But recent events suggest that the day they were handing out common sense some people stepped up to the nonsense window instead.

Police and fire vehicles shield the view of a trailer home where five children died in a house fire in The Butte, Alaska, on Thursday, Sept. 7, 2017. Officials believes the victims were five girls, all between the ages of 3 and 12. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)

Racing to the self-driving car

The freedom of the open road holds a magnetic appeal for Americans, quickening like the flood when Henry Ford unleashed his Model T, but exhilaration can't be traded for the convenience of the "safety" of a car that drives itself. Such a car is a measure of progress only if it works.

Give Lee credit for contributions

The pell-mell rush to remove any public reference to Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee is as thoughtless as it is short-sighted. There were reasons other than romanticizing slavery that led to honoring Lee. The post-war Lee is a figure that all Americans should appreciate.

Bolster Japan to weaken N. Korea

As a counterweight to China and North Korea we should encourage Japan to build up its military capabilities. Japan should increase its front-line military personnel from 250,000 to 350,000 and increase the number of tanks from 700 to 1,000 and armored vehicles from 3,000 to 4,000.