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Demonstrators sharing opposing views argue during a rally Thursday, April 27, 2017, in Berkeley, Calif. Demonstrators gathered near the University of California, Berkeley campus amid a strong police presence and rallied to show support for free speech and condemn the views of Ann Coulter and her supporters. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

Spooked by the power of words, words, words

- The Washington Times

The only thing anyone is allowed to hear on campus is a slogan. Thinking is so 20th century (and early 20th century at that). The adults paid to be in charge have retreated to a safe place, where never is heard an encouraging word and the skies are cloudy all day.

Illustration on fixing the net neutrality law by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Controlling the nation’s internet

Do you remember the last time you had an issue with your internet connection and the federal government cheerfully helped you resolve it? Me neither. Yet the same federal government who spent $2 billion on a website that was more likely to dish out electric shocks than work properly is now literally in control of our nation’s internet, under the false rubric of promoting “net neutrality.”

Immoral Illegal Drugs Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why buying illegal drugs is immoral

Purchasing illegal drugs is an immoral act, regardless of where one stands in the legalization debate. When drugs are legally prohibited, criminal organizations assume control of production and distribution, making violence inherent in the process. Drug proceeds are used to fund criminal and terrorist organizations, enabling them to murder innocent people, attack police and military, bleed our tax dollars, and destroy the rule of law.

Illustration on gun control debate by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Challenging inaccurate information about guns

When you receive glowing media attention and have hundreds of millions of dollars to spend, you don’t really have to debate. Michael Bloomberg just announced last week that he would be putting $25 million into next year’s House and Senate races. From 2013 to 2016, he donated $48 million toward congressional races. By contrast, the NRA contributed a measly $2.1 million. And Mr. Bloomberg spent about 85 percent more on lobbying, more on television advertising, and much more for state and local political races.

Illustration on the Clinton campaign by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How Hillary doomed her ‘inevitable presidency’

While we’re examining the accomplishments of Donald Trump’s first 100 days — putting his man on the U.S. Supreme Court is the biggie — Hillary Clinton is getting the once-over (and the second and third) for all the reasons why she’s not the first woman to preside over her own first 100 days in the Oval Office.

Illustration on the Trump White House decision to broaden media access by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Talking right

President Trump did something Monday I have long advocated. He met with a small group of conservative journalists, pundits and radio talk show hosts. I was among them.

This May 23, 2016, file photo, shows the northernmost boundary of the proposed Bears Ears region, along the Colorado River, in southeastern Utah. Western Democrats are pressuring President Donald Trump not to rescind land protections put in place by President Barack Obama, including Utah's Bears Ears National Monument. Obama infuriated Utah Republicans when he created the monument on 1.3 million acres of land that is sacred to Native Americans. (Francisco Kjolseth/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP, File)

Go, Trump, go — pare back the national monuments

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump is taking aim at some of Barack Obama’s national monuments, as well as at designations made by other presidents. And this is great news. Terrific news. When it comes to the country’s national monuments, this White House’s attitude should be one of slash and burn — not conserve and preserve.

Illustration on the dangerous complications of the Obama/Iran nuke deal by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Tangled in Obama’s Iran nuclear trap

On April 18, the State Department certified Iran to be in compliance with its commitments under the Iran nuclear deal (Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA). As France’s iconic foreign minister, the Marquis de Talleyrand, once reportedly said: “This was worse than a crime; it was a mistake.”

Illustration on the sources of Trump's ideas by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The anatomy of a Trump decision

When Donald Trump’s Florida lawyer Paul Rampell first proposed turning the future president’s Mar-a-Lago estate into a private club, Mr. Trump pronounced the idea “dumb.” Over the next month, Messrs. Rampell and Trump argued back and forth about the idea until Mr. Trump finally agreed with Mr. Rampell.

DAY 40 - In this Feb. 28, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump, flanked by Vice President Mike Pence and House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., gestures on Capitol Hill in Washington, before his address to a joint session of Congress. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, file)

Ending the threats of a government shutdown

We are looking at another potential federal government shutdown this week. The high drama over passing a budget, passing spending bills under regular order, and the lifting of the debt ceiling has gone on for far too many years.

Illustration on a possible replay of 1927 for the Democrat party in 2020 by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Will 2020 be another 1972 for Democrats?

The year 1968 was a tumultuous one that saw the assassinations of rival candidate Sen. Robert F. Kennedy and civil rights icon Martin Luther King Jr. Lyndon Johnson’s unpopular lame-duck Democratic administration imploded due to massive protests against the Vietnam War.

Democrats can’t chart their way forward in this wilderness

Like most minority parties that lose the White House, the Democratic Party is without a national leader. Their legislative caucuses in the House and Senate have elected leadership, but the party itself has several elected officials fighting to lead it into the future, all with an eye toward 2020. And the party’s most visible figures aren’t exactly fresh faces.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton gives an acceptance speech after accepting the Trailblazer Award during the LGBT Community Center Dinner at Cipriani Wall Street on Thursday, April 20, 2017, in New York. (AP Photo/Kevin Hagen) ** FILE **

The Democratic Party’s ‘Gong Show’

Finally, the Democrats admit it wasn’t the Russians, James B. Comey or sexism that brought Hillary Clinton down. We are now told by journalists, leading Democrats, and even a former Democratic presidential candidate, that it was the inept dysfunction of the party itself, Hillary, and her abused and frightened team that has reduced them all to irrelevant, vapid political busybodies.

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Improve high-speed rail

With the recent controversy over United Airlines violently pulling a seated passenger off a flight, it is good to reflect on air travel in general. Passengers are expected to arrive at the terminal two hours before their scheduled flights, then endure security lines, which entail removing shoes and being patted down.

Spicer Hitler comments unacceptable

Press Secretary Sean Spicer's recent comments during Passover regarding Adolf Hitler, Syrian leader Bashar Assad and poison gas were totally insensitive and inexcusable ("Sean Spicer: I 'let the president down' with Hitler-Assad comments," Web, April 12).

Muslim leaders must seek change

If the recent attempt by Islamists to kill Coptic Pope Tawadros II does not finally open the eyes of the world to the fact that Islam is not a religion but an ideology seeking total domination, then we are blind ("Suicide bombers kill 44 at Palm Sunday services in Egypt," Web, April 9).

President Donald Trump, accompanied by first lady Melania Trump waves to onlookers as he enters Episcopal Church of Bethesda-by-the-Sea in Palm Beach, Fla., for an Easter Service, Sunday, April 16, 2017. (Joe Cavaretta/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)

The war for Trump's ear

There's an ominous rumble of war in Korea, there's always an ominous rumble of war in the Middle East, but in Washington we've already got the real thing. The combatants are taking no prisoners and the rules of the Geneva Convention do not apply.

Ohio State kicker Sean Nuernberger plays in their NCAA college spring football game Saturday, April 15, 2017, in Columbus, Ohio. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete)

Guns are big, but football's bigger

Guns are big in Arkansas, but hogs and football can be bigger. The National Rifle Association took on the Razorbacks of the University of Arkansas over a law that would have enabled fans to take their guns to the game, and the Razorbacks won.

A hooded penitent from "Cristo de los Angeles" brotherhood holds a cross inside the "Gaitanas" church before taking part in a traditional annual Holy Week procession in Toledo, Spain, Tuesday, April 11, 2017. Hundreds of processions take place throughout Spain during the Easter Holy Week. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

Why America needs God

- The Washington Times

Atheists and progressives will tell you America is a secular nation, built on secular principles, and that it's the job of the rising generations to make sure politics and religion never do meet. They are wrong.

Han Song Ryol, North Korea's vice foreign minister, listens to a translator during an interview with The Associated Press on Friday, April 14, 2017, in Pyongyang, North Korea. Han Song Ryol said the situation on the Korean Peninsula is now in a "vicious cycle." (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

John Bolton hits it on head with North Korea

- The Washington Times

Former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations John Bolton offered up a pretty blunt assessment of the North Korea thang that went like this: Want to get rid of the nuke threat from that regime? Then take out the regime.

Ruth Bader Ginsberg (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Donald Trump and his flexible mind

- The Washington Times

If chaos is the sign of growth -- and sometimes that's a fair description of progress -- Donald Trump is on course to build an administration that can survive the fits, starts and mistakes of a drawn-out opening night.

Illustration on the work of Fred Kelly Grant by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Unsung hero of rural America

While President Trump and Congress tackle federal regulations and the agencies that promulgate them, Fred Kelly Grant is quietly doing the same -- and succeeding -- with the most powerful weapon you've likely never heard of.

Trump's not so great deal with China

President Trump's recent summit with Chinese President Xi Jinping was only modestly successful. The hard reality is that on both security and economic issues, the United States and China are rivals -- not partners -- and much tougher days lie ahead.

President Trump now is convinced that the Export-Import Bank's corporate welfare produces jobs. He said he would nominate people to fill its vacant board seats. (Associated Press)

Doing the policy zigzag

It's not wrong for a president to change his mind as circumstances warrant, but Donald Trump is setting a record for ditching major positions he staked out in his 2016 campaign.

Detail of 'The Statue of Brothers' at The War Memorial of Koea in Seoul. Photo illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Countdown to one Korea

That drumbeat you hear is Korea marching toward unification. No gunshots. No missile launches. No tanks rumbling over the 38th parallel as in June 1950.

Hooded penitents from "Jesus con la Cruz a Cuestas" brotherhood hold lanterns with candles they take part in a traditional annual Holy Week procession in Segovia, Spain, Thursday, April 13, 2017. Hundreds of processions take place throughout Spain during the Easter Holy Week. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

The Passion of the Christ

Straightaway in the morning, the chief priests held a consultation with the elders and scribes and the whole council, and bound Jesus, and carried him away, and delivered Him to Pilate.

In this Sept. 8, 2015, file photo, a United Airlines passenger plane lands at Newark Liberty International Airport in Newark, N.J. Twitter users are poking fun at United's tactics in having a man removed from an overbooked Chicago to Louisville flight on April 9, 2017.  (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File) **FILE**

United Airlines and the golden age of airline deregulation

- The Washington Times

Blame Islamist terrorists and, yes, government airline deregulation for United Airlines' thuggish and bloody assault on a passenger on April 10. (Let the record show that for a decade I editorialized for deregulation and still think, within rational limits - I want a Food and Drug Administration -- the freer the markets the better for consumers and society in general.)

A European Union flag waves in the wind in front of the Chancellery in Berlin on Oct. 12, 2012. **FILE**

'Old Europe' sinks under the weight of secular progressivism

This week the existential problems facing the European Union came into stark relief as Belgium threatened Poland and Hungary with legal action if they did not agree to commit cultural suicide by letting in hundreds of thousands of "refugees" from the Middle East. This comes on the heels of Facebook-livestreamed rapes in Sweden, truck attacks in France and other Western European capitals, and jihadist bombs targeting the buses of famous soccer teams in Germany.