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Illustration on Memorial Day by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

Showing America’s gratitude

Orderly rows of white headstones line national cemeteries throughout our country. Each bears a name and behind that is a story of sacrifice. Today, a grateful nation remembers, but there is more we can do.

Illustration on remembering the sacrifices of U.S. Special Operators by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why special operators’ families must be remembered

Memorial Day is set aside for us to remember those who have fallen in defense of our country. This year’s observance should remind us that too many of us pay too little attention to the war that erupted on 9/11 in which Americans are still fighting, and sometimes dying, in many places around the world.

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump walk from Marine One across the South Lawn to the White House in Washington, Saturday, May 27, 2017, as they return from Sigonella, Italy. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

No, Trump didn’t cause Obamacare to fail

It’s finally official. Obamacare is a public policy flop of epic proportions. That’s the only possible conclusion from the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Kansas City announcement last week that it will drop out of many markets in Kansas and Missouri.

Karen Clarkson, of Fairbanks, Alaska, kneels and cries at the grave of her son U.S. Army Sergeant Joel Clarkson on Memorial Day at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va., Monday, May 28, 2012. (Rod Lamkey Jr/The Washington Times)

The bitter history of Memorial Day

It used to be called Decoration Day and was observed on May 30. Today it’s commonly known as Memorial Day and is celebrated on the last Monday in May, mostly to give Americans a long weekend. But it used to be a solemn remembrance of the nation’s war dead — by decorating graves with spring flowers.

Former US President Barack Obama is awarded the German Media Prize 2016 in Baden-Baden, Germany, Thursday, May 25, 2017.(AP Photo/Michael Probst)

The latest news from the president in exile

- The Washington Times

The government in exile — the real one, according to the media — has had a busy week at home and abroad. “President Obama” has given up leading from behind and presumes now to lead from overseas. His secretary of state has a new mission, as missionary to the safe places where snowflakes fall.

Illustration on Obama's Labor Board legacy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Ending the Obama labor board majority

Elections have consequences, or at least they are supposed to. Unfortunately for the rights of independent workers who don’t want to associate with a labor union, more than 100 days have passed since Barack Obama left office, but the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) remains in the hands of an Obama majority intent on pushing the limits of Big Labor’s forced unionism powers. It doesn’t need to be that way.

Illustration on Confederate soldiers buried in Arlington Cemetery by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Memorial Day must honor all of America’s fallen

As president of the American Veterans Center, the organization that produces the National Memorial Day Parade in Washington D.C., I am sometimes questioned as to why we include Confederate reenactors in our timeline of American military history.

Illustration on tax reform by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The case for tax and entitlement reform

Lobbyists are out in full force to block genuine tax reform. If Congress bends, great harm will come to ordinary folk — fewer good-paying jobs and a federal government too strapped to care for seniors and the truly needy.

Illustration on Trump's "Russian' problems by Kevin Kreneck/Tribune Content Agency

Possible crimes and cover-ups

In his first four months in office, President Trump has achieved the dubious distinction of being investigated by an independent prosecutor and at least five major oversight committees in Congress run by his own party.

FILE - In this Oct. 26, 2016, file photo, one of the remaining cows on Alabama farmer David Bailey's farm, walks towards a pile of hay to be fed, surrounded by dirt where ankle deep green grass use to be, acceding to Bailey, in Dawson, Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson, File)

What’s the cattlemen’s beef? Washington

- The Washington Times

David Cook is a cattleman, a rancher and a member of the Arizona State House. He’s no Beltway insider. Mr. Cook came to Washington this week to spell out his beef. In short, he wants Congress to stop trying to lasso other ranchers and rural Americans with regulations.

Illustration on the need for Arab states to deal with Islamist terror by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A harsh message worth sending

Just when everyone here was deep in preoccupation with partisan fantasy over whether Donald Trump should be impeached or removed by the 25th Amendment, the president changed the subject. Presidents can do that.

Illustration on Saudia Arabian duplicity by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Saudi Arabia’s duplicity

Trusting Saudi Arabia to combat terrorists and extremists and “drive them out,” as President Trump called on the kingdom and other Arab and Muslim nations to do in his Riyadh speech, is akin to forging an alliance with the Ku Klux Klan to combat racism and anti-Semitism.

Protesters from labor and other progressive groups fill the rotunda of the state Capitol in St. Paul, Minn., on Wednesday, May 24, 2017, to demand that Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton veto the bills that passed before the Minnesota Legislature's special session bogged down earlier in the day. (AP Photo/Steve Karnowski)

The dirty secret behind big labor’s decline

- The Washington Times

My father was a toolmaker and union organizer who, for many years, headed the Rockford, Ill. Labor Council while my mother was serving five terms as head of the Women’s Auxiliary of the United Auto Workers. Dad worked as a machinist and my mother as a waitress and clerk in a local jewelry store until my dad retired and joined a couple of buddies to buy a bar.

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In this Saturday, May 13, 2017, photo, with a Gen. Robert E. Lee statue in the background, people gather at Lee Park in Charlottesville, Va., to protest the plans to remove the monument. (Allison Wrabel/The Daily Progress via AP)

Richard Spencer, you're not helping

- The Washington Times

Revising history, tearing down history and carting away history -- all for the sake of saving someone's hurt feelings -- is a despicable trend of late that's been prompted in large part by minority groups that have finally found a voice. But Richard Spencer, you're not helping.

Differing Costs of Pharmaceuticals Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Common-sense remedies for sky-high drug prices

Partisan warfare in Washington never seems to stop. Yet, in poll after poll, Americans want lawmakers to work across the aisle and get things done.

An unsparing accounting of a privileged life

If reading what Joyce Carol Oates memorably dubbed pathographies leaves you with an uneasy feeling about those who so rough up their subjects, this memoir by Patricia is a salutary antidote.

Macron and the Future of the European Union Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why Macron's election is unlikely to save the EU

The victory of France's President-elect Emmanuel Macron is good news. If he stays true to his agenda, Mr. Macron's reforms will stimulate hiring, investment and economic growth at home.

Peace a la Putin

Vladimir Putin's Russia continues to be the best example of a nation whose military power is magnified beyond reality by the perceptions it workers deftly to create. Two examples of that deftness were displayed by a massive military parade last week and, the week before that, by Mr. Putin's proposal to stop the war in Syria.

Rowers paddle down the Charles River near the campus of Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., Tuesday, March 7, 2017. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Segregated commencement at Harvard

The commencement season is at hand, soon school will be suspended for the summer, and the silly season is at hand. Students are competing with the college dean and the university president to be the Sophomore of the Year.

Comey overstepped bounds

Conspiracy theorists, partisan Democrats, political junkies and other masochists are cranking out a firestorm of stories, claims and counterclaims about why, how and when President Trump fired FBI director James Comey.

Seattle Police Officers stage near a May Day protest, Monday, May 1, 2017, in Seattle.  Immigrant and union groups marched in cities across the United States on Monday, to mark May Day and protest against President Donald Trump's efforts to boost deportations. The day has become a rallying point for immigrants in the U.S. since demonstrations were held in 2006 against a proposed immigration enforcement bill. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

For Republicans, it's getting dangerous out there

- The Washington Times

A Tennessee woman, apparently discontent with her congressman's remarks at a town hall at the University of Tennessee-Martin, did what any normal, curious and courteous constituent would do to have her followup concerns addressed -- she chased his car down, forced him off the road and started screaming and banging on their windows. You guessed it. The congressman, David Kustoff, is a Republican

Sessions' law and order memo likely to irk left

- The Washington Times

Attorney General Jeff Sessions, with one quick stroke of the pen, overturned some lax criminal policies of the previous Barack Obama administration -- the ones that said certain suspects ought to only be charged with minimum offenses. Get ready: The lawsuits from the left are sure to come.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. signals a thumbs-up as he leaves the Senate chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 6, 2017, after he led the GOP majority to change Senate rules and lower the vote threshold for Supreme Court nominees from 60 votes to a simple majority in order to advance Neil Gorsuch to a confirmation vote. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Mitch McConnell emerges from man cave!

- The Washington Times

Listen up! Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has emerged from his man cave to issue an Official Announcement -- an announcement of such epic importance that it's truly more a pronouncement -- and it's one that goes like this: Umm, you women over there. You all can come to the health care party, too.

Rep. Maxine Waters received a standing ovation before presenting the "Best Fight Against the System" award at the MTV Movie & TV Awards Sunday night. (MTV)

Maxine Waters, you're embarrassing yourself

- The Washington Times

Rep. Maxine Waters, who long ago abandoned any pretense at being a constitutionally minded member of Congress, is now rapidly moving into a realm of reality that doesn't even allow her to be a useful idiot for the Democrats.

Illustration on the Patriot Acts dangerous precedents by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A lesson in the loss of liberty

- The Washington Times

It was 2001 not long after the twin towers had fallen and the nation's politicians were running scared. George W. Bush was in the White House and John Ashcroft was attorney general.

Illustration on the Trump firing by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Flames from the Comey firing

Sir Walter Scott's epic admonition, "Oh, what a web we weave when first we practice to deceive," perfectly describes the furor over President Trump's firing of FBI Director James Comey.