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Illustration on the failures of tne war on poverty by Alexander hunter/The Washington Times

The War on Poverty: 50 years of failure

In January 1964, President Johnson declared “unconditional war on poverty in America.” Since then, the taxpayers have spent $22 trillion on Johnson’s war.

Illustration on the need for ground troops by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The error of relying on air power

It is the 21st-century version of the classic question once posed by The Eagles. So who you gonna’ believe: President Obama or your lyin’ eyes?

Illustration on U.S. China relations by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Russia and China, masters of mischief

The international security meeting in Paris on Monday showcased a world in fear of the growing threat that the Islamic State poses to the global order.

A large American Flag is unfurled on the Pentagon a day before the anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, Arlington, Va., Wednesday, September 10, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

CROCKER: What Patton would think of America 2014

If you took a doughboy of the Great War – say, Gen. George S. Patton – and dropped him in America today, what would he think of the country he fought to defend?

David Brock, a former critic and later defender of Bill and Hillary Clinton, will head the Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics. (associated press)

CREW cut: Washington’s ‘watchdog’ hypocrisy

“Read my lips, no new taxes.” “I did not have sex with that woman … .” “If you like your plan, you can keep your plan.” Saying one thing and doing another — it’s the way of Washington.

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U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan takes questions from a panel of reporters, Tuesday, Sept. 2, 2014, at the Rotary Club of Milwaukee. Ryan blamed the Obama administration for contributing to the circumstances that led to the swift ascent of the Islamic State, a militant group that purportedly beheaded a second American journalist in two weeks. (AP Photo/Dinesh Ramde)

A society sickened by welfare

Congress has returned to Washington, but not for long. The looming midterm elections mean that lawmakers are here only for what USA Today calls "a three-week sprint" before they're back out to campaign.

In this Sept. 6, 2014 image released by NBC, Chuck Todd, left, speaks with President Barack Obama prior to an interview for "Meet the Press" at the White House in Washington. Todd debuted as moderator of NBC's "Meet the Press," Sunday, Sept. 7, bringing a low-key style and surrounding himself with fellow pundits as NBC turns to him to erase a slide that has taken the long-running Sunday morning political affairs program from first to third in the ratings. (AP Photo/NBC, William B. Plowman)

When presidential boredom is not an option

- The Washington Times

President Obama's hair, like the locks of most of the presidents in their second terms, has turned white. He says he doesn't get enough sleep, but he's nevertheless energized, not exhausted. Bored is more like it.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Did Snowden leak golfer-in-chief's transcripts?

After reading "Islamic State using leaked Snowden info to evade U.S. intelligence" (Web, Sept. 4), I couldn't help but speculate that the real value of Edward Snowden's espionage is that President Obama's university transcripts, which have never been publicly released and may have been stored on an NSA database that Mr. Snowden stole, are now common knowledge throughout the Islamic world.

The Liberal Bully of the Week --- Josh Earnest

President Obama may have admitted he doesn't have a strategy for dealing with the Islamic State, but he does have a blueprint for handling his critics here in the United States, because to this president, they are the real enemy.

People signing up for unemployment fill a room at the Atlantic City Convention Center in Atlantic City, N.J. on Wednesday, Sept. 3, 2014. Thousands of newly laid-off casino workers turned out for a mass unemployment filing. The Wednesday morning session comes after a weekend that saw more than 5,000 employees at the Showboat and Revel lose their jobs. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

MORICI: Jobs numbers tank as Obama's policies fail

The economy created only 142,000 jobs in August, down from 212,000 in July, indicating the economy significantly slowed this summer. The real unemployment rate is closer to 18 percent.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Vertigo 42'

There is Aghast the goat, Aggrieved the horse and Aggro the dog, all property of Melrose Plant, the former Lord Ardry, who is a member of an exclusive London club called Borings and also a friend of Inspector Richard Jury of Scotland Yard — and, of course, there are murders.

Israeli Submarine Based Missile Defense Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A sea-based nuclear deterrent for Israel

For Israel, an overriding long-term security requirement must be to deter future attacks with weapons of mass destruction (WMD) by enemy states, especially Iran.

Young women play in the fountains surrounding the Unisphere at Flushing Meadows Corona Park in New York Sunday, Aug. 24, 2014. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

AGNESS: Ladies, don't be fooled by Cosmo

From the wardrobe to the bedroom, Cosmopolitan magazine is known for offering women advice about the most intimate aspects of their lives. But the magazine has found a new aspect of women's lives they'd like to shape—their decisions in the voting booth.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Impossible Exile'

Is it possible to feel a deep sense of loss for something that never was? Millions of white Southerners, most of whose ancestors led hardscrabble lives as small farmers, day laborers or petty tradesmen, still wax sentimental about a glamorous, "lost" antebellum world that existed mainly within the covers of Margaret Mitchell's "Gone with the Wind."