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North Korean Nuclear War Threat Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The North Korean war scare

In 2015 the Intelligence Community declassified The 1983 Soviet “War Scare” — the definitive report by the president’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board on how and why the USSR nearly launched a preemptive nuclear strike during the NATO theater nuclear exercise ABLE ARCHER-83, held in November 1983.

Illustration on U.S./Saudi cooperation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Resetting U.S.-Saudi relations

Saudi Arabia is looking forward to a resumption of strong and friendly relations with the U.S. following the recent visit of Saudi Deputy Crown Prince bin Salman with President Trump at the White House.

Illustration on the GOP and the Federal budget by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Republican budget woes

President Trump and Republicans in Congress have a once in a generation opportunity to dramatically roll back the frontiers of government but will likely fall short because of their lack of candor and finesse.

FILE - In this Dec. 1, 2016, file photo, President-elect Donald Trump speaks at the Carrier Corp. factory in Indianapolis. The $7 million deal to save jobs at the Carrier factory in Indianapolis is poised for approval by state officials nearly four months after President Donald Trump celebrated his role in the negotiations with a post-election visit to the plant. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings, File)

Steering attention left

Meanwhile, here on Earth, mainstream websites, newspapers, TV and radio trash President Trump incessantly. Consumer confidence gallops? New jobs bulge? The stock market soars? Immaterial. The president is teetering, according to reports that so many Americans follow. Just stroll through a recent day’s snippet at Yahoo and you see not one positive angle. Only these:

Huey P. Long (Associated press)

Here comes the judge

- The Washington Times

Neil Gorsuch took the best shots, such as they were, of disheartened, dismayed and despondent Democrats this week, and nobody laid a glove on him. He was as fresh when it was over as when the slugging, such as it was, began.

Working Together to Stop Nuclear Terror Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The growing threat of nuclear terrorism

The greatest challenge to global security is the nuclear threat from rogue states, led by North Korea and Iran. There will be no progress in ensuring global nuclear stability without cooperation between the United States and Russia. This should be a major priority for Presidents Trump and Putin. Much has been made of states trying to secure their borders against terrorist threats. While it is essential that borders are secured, terrorism is tackled and hatred confronted, we cannot ignore the greatest contemporary threat of all, nuclear attacks. It feels remote and unlikely, but is a very clear and present danger.

Social warriors, sometimes

- The Washington Times

Rape stories, when they can be used to vault social-justice issues into the nation’s psyche, get exhaustive coverage and opining by the mainstream media, regardless of whether they’re even true.

Refugee Comparison Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Promoting unrestricted immigration with a false equivalent

President Trump has issued a modified version of his previous immigration policy executive order that was stalled six weeks ago by a federal judge in the state of Washington. Mr. Trump has been under relentless attack from those on the left against his efforts to limit immigration from terrorist-producing areas and his call for comprehensive vetting and background checks. Beyond doubt, it is the first and most important duty of a president to protect the lives of a country’s citizens, especially where a possibility exists of terrorists being embedded within a particular immigration flow. As the president previously stated, to not strictly enforce our immigration laws is “not compassion but recklessness.”

President Trump listens as Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi speaks during a meeting in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. In an eventful week of politics, Mr. Trump will need to restore his credibility so he can handle the next crisis, says Matt Mackowiak. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

President Trump will need to rebuild his credibility for the next crisis

While President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee held up superbly under long days of confirmation hearings questioning, and the administration and the House GOP leadership furiously worked to assemble votes for the Obamacare replacement bill, the scene at Monday’s House Intelligence Committee hearing verged on the truly incredible.

Illustration on the Class of '21 by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Class of ‘21, in hot pursuit of their Brave New World

The college Class of ‘21 is racing with caught breath and trembling fingers to check their email, pick up their snail mail, and steel themselves to read those college acceptance and rejection letters. Many schools have already dispatched congrats and regrets to thousands of applicants, and the Ivies still have a week to go before they put their letters in the mail.

Illegal Voter Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

From Free State to sanctuary state

- The Washington Times

Maryland is quite a place. The state’s voters elected a Republican governor in 2014, but control remains in the hands of the same “progressives” who enjoy veto-proof majorities in both houses of the legislature on most issues. They vote as if former Gov. and presidential wannabe Martin O’Malley is still ruling the roost in Annapolis.

Henry Sanchez, 18, is one of the students charged with rape. (Associated Press)

Maryland’s ‘safe’ environment

A rough translation of Maryland’s state motto is “Strong Deeds, Gentle Words.” In the case of a 14-year-old girl who was recently raped and sodomized in a restroom at Rockville High School by two males students, both immigrants, one facing a deportation hearing, that motto in practice has been reversed.

Related Articles

Folders containing amendments to the GOP's "Obamacare" replacement bill are spread on a conference table on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, March 9, 2017, as members of the House Energy and Commerce Committee worked through the night. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Republicans gone drunk on health care power

- The Washington Times

Come on, Republicans. Have you gone commie? How else to explain this, from CNN: "While Republicans are pushing to drop the requirement of Obamacare that compels Americans to get insurance, another move in a separate bill could compel employees to participate in workplace wellness programs that collect their and their families' health and genetic data."

In this March 9, 2017, file photo, House Speaker Paul D. Ryan of Wis. uses charts and graphs to make his case for the GOP's long-awaited plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Paul 'never defend Trump' Ryan exposed as two-faced

- The Washington Times

Wow -- this is like a "Girls Gone Wild" tape for the political world. House Speaker Paul D. Ryan, the Republican public servant from Wisconsin, was captured on audio during the campaign season saying he'd never defend Donald Trump. Not then. Not ever.

Trump wiretap brouhaha raises Patriot vs. Patriot Act fight

- The Washington Times

The media's been filled with busy bees lately, painting President Donald Trump with the crazy stick and demanding he produce proof of Barack Obama's wiretap of Trump Tower -- but what has happened to America, land of the free, country of the Constitution, that wiretapping one's own citizens has become so believable?

Maintaining Accurate Voter Registration Records Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The dirty work behind clean elections

As the White House prepares to set up a commission focused on potential voting irregularities, election officials from across the nation are busy conducting statutorily required voter list maintenance to ensure their rolls are ready ahead of the next vote. It's an important part of protecting the integrity of our nation's elections and saving vital taxpayer dollars.

Ambassador Sergey Kislyak (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Paranoia is what's for dinner in Washington

- The Washington Times

Paranoia is suddenly what's for dinner in Washington. The most fervent patriot can be a spy and never know it until someone posts a video of the high crime and misdemeanor of someone shaking a Russian hand.

The Great Pumpkin Rises Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

America's longest war

Gov. Andrew Cuomo wants to spend $1.4 billion of New York's resources to solve the persistent problem of poverty in central Brooklyn. If he wins legislative approval, Mr. Cuomo, a Democrat, intends to spend the money on affordable housing, job training, anti-violence programs, recreational space, even obesity. Some cynics suggest the proposal is targeted at boosting Mr. Cuomo's presidential prospects in 2020, but let's give him the benefit of the doubt and take his proposals seriously.

Illustration on the U.S. dealing with rogue nuclear powers by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The risk of rogue nukes

Nuclear Russia and China are America's major geopolitical adversaries and national security risks. Nevertheless, for decades we have steadily improved relations with these countries and the risk of war with them is low. Our top national security risks are unpredictable rogue states that are developing missiles to carry out a nuclear attack on America. Our foreign policy and military strategy should adjust accordingly.

'Disunited we stumble'

President Trump's executive order on immigration has more than its fair share of critics. Among them, apparently, is someone at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). The leaked report indicating that the children of immigrants raised in America radicalize at a higher rate than their parents do was plainly meant to undercut the president's order.

Workers man a call center in the southwestern U.S. (AP file photo)

'SEIU' is short for unemployment

I just came back from California, where starter wage mandates are wreaking havoc on the entry-level job market. I took a video of five kiosk ordering screens in a Taco Bell. You order, pay, pick up your food and a self-pour soda cup without ever having to talk to anyone.

Illustration on Hillary's history of actions in favor of Russia   The Washington Times

Gauging who would gain from Russian interference

Are you shocked that the Russians might have had an interest in who won the U.S. presidential election? Nations have always had an interest in who rules the nations they deal with -- both opponents and friends -- and that they often try to influence the outcomes should come as no surprise.

Safe Choice Logo Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Saving EPA's Safer Choice

Anyone who's bought a washing machine knows Energy Star, the government label that denotes energy efficiency. People who buy cleaning products are increasingly aware of Safer Choice, the federal mark for items that are safer for the environment.

An American poet and his demons

Seldom if ever has there been such a neat match between author and subject as in this penetrating study of the American poet Robert Lowell (1917-1977). If other poets have struggled with mental illness, there can be few who have done so more fiercely and painfully than Lowell, nor perhaps any whose challenges in that arena are as bound up with his literary output.

Health care bill on life support

The Republican health-care bill, the American Health Care Act, faces opposition from not only the Democrats, but from the Republicans themselves. The interparty division can be seen on both ends of the spectrum, from the moderates to the ultra-conservative members of the party. The Republican leadership insists it has the support needed to get the bill to the president's desk even without a single vote from the Democrats. That road appears to have been harder than anticipated, as the hearings in the House burned the midnight oil to escape the various committees responsible for vetting the bill. It won't get any easier once the bill hits the Senate floor, either.

Planned Parenthood in it for cash

Many thanks to Kelly Riddell for her excellent Commentary piece, "Why Planned Parenthood must be defunded" (Web, March 9). Ms. Riddell points out that Planned Parenthood is an abortion organization that gets 86 percent of its non-government revenue from abortions. In fact, President Trump offered to continue the group's federal funding if it stopped doing abortions. It refused.

FILE- In this Sept. 17, 2015 file photo, U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara speaks during a news conference in New York.  On Wednesday, March 8, 2017, two days before Attorney General Jeff Sessions gave dozens of the country's top federal prosecutors just hours to resign and clean out their desks, Sessions gave those political appointees a pep talk during a conference call. Bharara said on Saturday, March 11, 2017, that he was fired after refusing to resign. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

Gamesmanship in Gotham

Preet Bharara is making a career of being one of 46 U.S. attorneys who was routinely asked to resign by President Trump, who, like his predecessors in the White House, wanted to install his own lawyers in these jobs. Mr. Bharara, who was appointed by Barack Obama for U.S. attorney in New York City, thinks life handed him a lemon and he dreams of making lemonade.

President Donald Trump looks over towards Budget Director Mick Mulvaney, left, after signing an executive order in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Monday, March 13, 2017. Trump signed "Comprehensive Plan for Reorganizing the Executive Branch". From left are, Mulvaney, Small Business Administration Administrator Linda McMahon, Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson, UN Ambassador Nikki Haley, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, Vice President Mike Pence, Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

What to do about the debt

The federal government collects plenty of money. The problem is that the government spends too much of it. The government wouldn't have this headache if it had heeded the advice of Thomas Jefferson: "Never spend your money before you have earned it."

No dice, BLM, Michael Brown was not innocent

- The Washington Times

A new documentary -- and remember, that word's been used in recent years to prove Al Gore right on climate change and Michael Moore similarly correct, that capitalism is racist -- purports to prove Michael Brown, the 18-year-old black man whose story sparked a militant national movement called Hands Up, Don't Shoot, was innocent of the crime that led to his killing.