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Illustration on Israel's nuclear strategy in light of use of nuclear weapons by other actors by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

On the eve of new atoms

The first post-World War II employment of nuclear weapons will probably be launched by North Korea or Pakistan. Should circumstances actually turn out this way, the resultant harms would impact not only the aggressor state and its victims, but also selected strategic nuclear policies in certain other states. The most significant example of such an impact would likely be Israel.

A Bangladeshi rickshaw transports a passenger in Old Dhaka, Bangladesh, Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016. Rickshaws are the most popular means of public transport in Dhaka. (AP Photo/A.M.Ahad)

Restoring free trade with Bangladesh

Since achieving independence in 1971, Bangladesh has been a strong friend and ally of the United States. Once defined by humanitarian help and development support, the relationship between the United States and Bangladesh is now firmly based on bilateral trade and investment. Today, Bangladeshi products find their way into virtually every American household.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016, in Melbourne, Fla. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Voting for growth

Voters must shake up Washington if they want a more prosperous future.

FILE - In this Saturday, Aug. 13, 2016 file photo, a soldier from the 1st Battalion of the Iraqi Special Operations Forces listens to an address by his commander after a training exercise to prepare for the operation to re-take Mosul from Islamic State militants, in Baghdad, Iraq. The disparate groups that make up Iraq's security forces are converging on the city of Mosul, lining up for a battle on the historic plains of northern Iraq that is likely to be decisive in the war against the Islamic State group(AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo, File)

What to do when a ‘narrative war’ fails

Apologies to White House spokesman Josh Earnest, who this week claimed we are in a “narrative war” with the Islamic State, or ISIS, but here’s the only narrative that the current crop of jihadists will understand: “When I am president of the United States, I will be eager and able to unleash on you history’s biggest, baddest collection of warriors, and should you choose to oppose them on the battlefield, they will kill you and break your stuff. Guaranteed.”

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's bellicose attitude by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When the Donald is the dove

It’s interesting when a longtime Democrat and long-ago speechwriter for John and Robert Kennedy declares he will vote for Donald Trump. That’s what Adam Walinsky did in Politico Magazine the other day. It’s even more interesting when hostile Democrats rush to defend Hillary Clinton from Mr. Walinsky’s attack, as Peter Beinart did in an article in The Atlantic calling Mr. Walinsky’s piece an “absurd and dishonest essay.”

Egg Shell Helmet Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Inmates’ defective work

A scathing report of a joint investigation by the Justice Department’s Inspector General and the Defense Criminal Investigative Service found that the Bureau of Prisons’ Federal Prison Industries (FPI) produced more than 100,000 combat helmets that were defective and would “likely cause serious injury or death to the wearer.”

Fresh Start Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The human face of overcriminalization

A young man from a low-income family sells small amounts of marijuana when real opportunity eludes him. He’s arrested and incarcerated several times. After being convicted and serving his sentence, he leaves prison with a record that will follow him for the rest of his life.

Illustration on the Colombia peace accord and cocaine exportation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Purchasing peace with cocaine?

Ninety-five percent of the cocaine sold on the streets of the United States today comes from Columbia. What’s more, the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, the State Department and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime all agree that the cultivation of coca, the plant used for making cocaine, is surging again in Colombia

John Kennedy     Associated Press photo

Goats in the White House

- The Washington Times

It’s the conceit of every age that it’s uniquely entitled to all the superlatives: it’s the best, the worst, the biggest, the smallest. Nothing before was anything like the present age, nor is it possible that anything in the future will surpass it.

Illustration on the potential political rift presented by the upcoming election by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When an election produces a political realignment

What do the election years 1800, 1828, 1860, 1896, 1932 and 1980 have in political common? They are usually described as “critical” or “realigning” elections by historians who argue they produced a significant realignment in our political system.

President Barack Obama speaks at the 2016 White House Tribal Nations Conference held in the Mellon Auditorium in Washington, Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Another useless Iraq surge

Pessimists and cynics are annoying, mostly because events prove them to be right far more often than they are proven wrong. Sometimes pessimism is the necessary result of an examination of history.

Illustration on new moves toward animal liberation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Food for thought about animal liberation

Peter Singer, Princeton professor and author of the book “Animal Liberation,” will be taking his radical views center stage at the upcoming “The Future of Food” event in Washington, D.C. Hosted by the extremist Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), the choice of Mr. Singer to keynote the event offers a peek at just how out of touch animal liberation activists are: While Mr. Singer is against eating animals, he’s OK with the idea of having sex with them.

Related Articles

Illustration on the US/Turkey alliance by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Turkey's critical anti-terror role

As the global fight against terrorism continues, Turkey has become America's most critical geopolitical ally in the fight against the Islamic State and other dangerous terrorist organizations.

FILE - In this Dec. 15, 2014 file photo, the State Department is seen in Washington. Ahead of Sundays 15th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, the State Department is reminding U.S. citizens about threats around the world and urging Americans to be vigilant about their personal security. (AP Photo/Luis M. Alvarez, File)

Slow-walking in Foggy Bottom

Whether Hillary Clinton wins the White House in November or is sent back to one of her estates to recover her health, it's unlikely that handling emails at her old shop at the State Department will ever be the same. The growing list of scandals over her misuse of electronic communications has trained a spotlight on the system's failures that she shamelessly exploited.

Obama's non-stick IRS

Who knew that ensuring fair and lawful tax collection was so problematic? Internal Revenue Service agents recently admitted to delaying tea party and other conservative group applications for tax-exempt status, and composing non-standard questions for those applicants ("IRS refuses to abandon targeting criteria used against tea party, conservative groups," Web Sept. 7).

The cult of global warming

In 2015 the World Economic Forum had a prophetic vision that unless the world mended its wicked ways, "global warming will become catastrophic and irreversible." This past July U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry claimed that global warming was as dangerous to the world as Islamic terrorism.

Illustration on the root of Detroit's troubles by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump's bad aim in Motown

The 2016 presidential circus made a brief stop here Labor Day weekend as Motown became the latest backdrop in another chapter of Trumpian bogeymen and media gotcha.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton pauses while speaking at a rally at Johnson C. Smith University, in Charlotte, N.C., Thursday, Sept. 8, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Miserables, deplorables and loose tongues

Hillary Clinton is the pluperfect wonk. She grooves on the trivia of policy and conversations with whoever carries a checkbook. But she doesn't understand campaign politics and has no appreciation of the fine points of the game she insists on trying to play.

Illustration on the prospect of tyranny in America by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why equal justice matters

More than two years ago, several independent researchers, investigative journalists and columnists (including yours truly) began providing evidence and reporting on apparent funds from Russian government-controlled entities funneling into U.S. environmental groups.

Illustration on Hillary's comments on Trump supporters by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The 'Deplorables'

Every now and again secular progressives rip off their mask and tell conservatives what they really think of them.

Union hypocrisy

Last month's first inaugural Fight for $15 convention in Richmond, Va., was overshadowed by the movement's own internal fight. Organizers behind the nationwide campaign demanded a union for themselves and in some cases a $15 minimum wage.

Illustration for Constitution Day by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Our forgotten national birthday

We celebrate every July 4th with fireworks, parades, speeches and other tributes. And rightly so -- our Declaration of Independence heralded a new age in human history. So why does Sept. 17 come and go with so little notice?

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Life and Crimes of Mafia Boss Vincent Gigante'

In the history of America's criminal organization Cosa Nostra, popularly known as the Mafia, Vincent "the Chin" Gigante stands out not only as one of the most powerful and successful bosses, he also stands out as one of the most peculiar.

Scimitar Skyline Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The lessons of 9/11 not learned

On Sunday, we observed the 15th anniversary of Sept. 11, the deadliest day in United States history. It is said that those who do not learn from history are destined to repeat it. So what have we learned?