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George H. W. Bush   Associated Press photo

Weak, confused and ‘unable to grasp’

- The Washington Times

Many bad things happen when a leader is weak, confused and forever in search of a credible reason to do nothing. For all his softness on Islam, Barack Obama has little insight into the men who send out mobs to cry “death to America.” He can’t imagine that men can listen to the call to evening Muslim prayer, which so captivated him as a boy growing up in Indonesia — “the prettiest sound on Earth” — and be inspired to dream of bringing down death on America.

Illustration on NOAA's climate change fictions by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

NOAA’s climate change science fiction

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is the nation’s leading collector of climate data. Every day, NOAA analyzes vast amounts of data to predict changes to our climate, weather, oceans and coasts. The agency also publishes monthly temperature averages across the nation and compares those numbers to historical temperature records.

The Invincible Obama Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Behind Obama’s lack of leadership

President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki killed more than 200,000 civilians but stopped a war that had already killed tens of millions and could have wiped out millions more.

Illustration on Obama's undermining Arctic oil exploration and production by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Tapping into energy obstructionism

When the Obama administration moved to embrace offshore energy exploration in Alaska earlier this year, skeptics raised a leery eyebrow. Could an administration so hostile to fossil fuels actually change its stripes?

U.S.-Iran Policy Paradox Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s Mideast paradox

Most students of Physics 101 have been exposed to a well-known thought experiment called “Schrodinger’s Cat.” In this experiment, renowned Danish physicist Erwin Schrodinger illustrates an absurd feature of quantum theory that allows a hypothetical cat to be both be alive and dead at the same time. This, however, is impossible, a paradox.

Illustration on giving thanks for the American military by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Grateful for American muscle

We Americans have much to be grateful for. Every year we gather together with friends and family to celebrate the Thanksgiving holiday. When we do, we should be grateful as well for the service of the American military in far-flung outposts.

Internal Revenue Service Commissioner John Koskinen answers to the House Oversight Committee in the panel's continuing probe of whether tea party groups were improperly targeted for increased scrutiny by the government's tax agency, at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, March 26, 2014. Earlier this month, IRS official Lois Lerner was called to testify about the controversy but refused to answer questions by committee Chairman Darrell Issa, R-Calif., and invoked her Fifth Amendment rights at least nine times. Associated Press Photo

Impeach IRS chief John Koskinen

After revelations that the Internal Revenue Service was restricting political speech and targeting conservative and tea party groups, John Koskinen was appointed to head the agency, promising reform and transparency.

The monument to General Gouverneur K. Warren at Gettysburg     The Washington Times

A Thanksgiving message in bronze

In the fall of 1865, America marked its first Thanksgiving since the end of the Civil War. Seven months earlier, after Robert E. Lee had surrendered on April 9, the North held a spontaneous jubilee. Cannons boomed, fireworks illuminated the night sky, bands played, people sang in the streets and crowds cheered the savior of the Union, Abraham Lincoln.

Religious Roots of Thanksgiving Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Proclaiming a day of Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is the time when America’s religious roots and traditions are publicly displayed. While we think of feasting at tables filled with food and drink, and imagine the Pilgrims in Plymouth Colony inviting neighboring Indians to join them to celebrate a plentiful harvest, Thanksgiving Day has a much more religious meaning. It was not uncommon in the 17th and 18th centuries for individual colonies to set aside days for prayers of gratitude to our Lord.

An American flag sits in front of gravestones on Veterans Day at San Francisco National Cemetery in the Presidio of San Francisco, Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2015. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

A refugee’s tale of Thanksgiving

As I grew up in America, I came to realize that the most effective antidote for fear is not courage, but gratitude.

Illustration on the processing of national security intelligence by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Memo to presidential campaign advisers

This memorandum is addressed to the brave souls advising presidential candidates. As you know, the recent terrorist attacks in France — and in Mali, Nigeria, Cameroon, Egypt, Lebanon, Turkey and Israel — have altered the political landscape. With less than a year to go before the 2016 election, the landscape may stay altered even if there are no more attacks — and that seems unlikely.

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A Secret Service police officer stands outside El Reno Federal Correctional Institution in El Reno, Okla. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

When 'hang 'em' all meets 'free 'em all'

- The Washington Times

Political demands for an end to what activists and the media like to call mass incarceration are all the rage these days, but the bipartisan willingness to look at what works and doesn't work in today's broken criminal justice system that has emerged in recent years is being overtaken or hijacked by ideological hucksters who seem more interested in making political statements than in finding real-world solutions to serious problems.

In this photo taken through a window, Cuban videographers film the U.S. flag from a crane after it was raised at the U.S. Embassy in Havana, Friday, Aug. 14, 2015. The Stars and Stripes rose over the newly reopened U.S. Embassy after a half-century of broken diplomatic relations. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

An upsurge in misery in Cuba

Barack Obama's attempt to woo Fidel and Raul Castro away from their regime's totalitarian roots has turned from disaster to catastrophe, giving a new and ugly meaning to President Obama's campaign slogan of "hope and change." So far there's been no change and no hope, but more misery.

USPS red ink is Washington's

The U.S. Postal Service is older than the country itself, delivers to 153 million homes and businesses, and consistently ranks as the public's most trusted federal agency. Yet misinformation about it abounds. Some such misinformation unfortunately appeared in Drew Johnson's column of Oct. 29 ("Postal service lies cost us billions," Web).

President Barack Obama makes a statement on the Keystone Pipeline from the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, Friday, Nov. 6, 2015.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

The sickening toll of Obamacare

Obamacare was supposed to provide more Americans with more affordable health care. The result would be fewer Americans suffering budget-breaking medical expenses and more Americans living a healthy life.

Congress, fully fund GMD

As North Korea moves toward testing its nuclear weapons and long-range missiles, Congress must ensure that our nation is defended by fully funding our defenses against these threats ("U.S. and South Korea formulate plan to deal with North Korea's missiles," Web, Nov. 4).

Obama Rejects Keystone Pipeline Project Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Keystone kaput for now

President Obama's unilateral rejection of the proposed KeystoneXL oil pipeline that would have brought petroleum and jobs to the United States is another in a long list of issues dominated by politics rather than common sense, economics and science.

Illustration on corrupt charities in the U.S. by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

'Tis the season for scamming

With Halloween behind us, a deluge of Christmas advertising is already starting to pervade the landscape. And with that is the beginning of another round of year-end fundraising appeals from charities. If you get a letter in the mail or see a tear-jerking ad on TV, make sure your heart doesn't get ahead of your head.

Illustration on the contentious nature of political debate by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

A renewed call for Senate civility

It's billed as "the world's greatest deliberative body." But at a time when public polls routinely place the popularity of federal lawmakers in single digits, it's time to ask: What happened to the U.S. Senate?

Ben Carson. (Associated Press)

Ben Carson learns about his 'place'

- The Washington Times

A black candidate for president learns the hard way that the media culture expects him to know a black man's place, and stay there. That place has to be in the Democratic Party.

Illustration on maintaining a balance of Pacific trade with the U.S. by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Choosing concession over protection

"When politicians can determine what can be bought and sold, the first thing to be bought and sold will be politicians." -- Mark Twain

BOOK REVIEW: 'Hitler at Home'

How did Adolf Hitler go from a figure of fun often likened to Charlie Chaplin's tramp to the leader so beloved by the bulk of Germany's population, no matter what they claimed in this regard after he had brought unheard-of mayhem, destruction and shame on them and their nation?

Bad Policy for Cyber Security Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A cybersecurity bill only a politician could love

As Congress moves to reconcile each chamber's version of the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA), civil liberties organizations and technology companies alike continue to pan the bill for threatening consumer privacy and covertly expanding government surveillance programs.

Fox News prime time host Bill O'Reilly  (Photo by Frank Micelotta/Invsion/AP, file)

Bill O'Reilly tops voter poll for most preferred GOP debate moderator

- The Washington Times

The next Republican debate looms on Tuesday night, and at last a pollster has asked GOP voters who they really want on the podium as moderator. Given a choice of seven primarily conservative or right leaning broadcasters, and here is how they ranked them, according to a new Vox Populi survey: Fox News prime time host Bill O'Reilly was in first place with 25 percent of the vote/

Say no to Kosovo in UNESCO

Recently the authorities of the self-proclaimed Republic of Kosovo have filed application for membership in UNESCO. This request is not only legally unacceptable, it is morally and logically absurd.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe speaks during a press conference at the prime minister's official residence  in Tokyo, Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)

The new player from Japan

This week Japan Post Holdings, where many Japanese put their household savings, began the privatization of one of the largest accumulations of capital in the world. The 144-year-old Japanese postal system, originally modeled after state corporations in France and Germany, sold shares in Japan Post Bank, which holds $1.5 trillion in Japanese household savings deposits, and Japan Post Insurance.

NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg speaks during a media conference at NATO headquarters in Brussels on Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2015. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)

Rising to the challenge

Nowhere in the muddle of Barack Obama's foreign policy, such as it is, are contradictions so apparent as in America's relations with the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

Trump the straw man

Has the star of the faux reality show "The Apprentice" tapped into a vein of discontent in America, and is he leveraging it to make "America Great again?"