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Illustration on the growing accusations against men as a group for sexual misconduct by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Young men’s lives matter, too

Everybody despises Harvey. Usually by this time in the public pursuit of a villain the scoundrel begins to attract a little undeserved sympathy. Not this time. The accusers keep on coming, with the passion of Emile Zola famously accusing the French government of hounding Alfred Dreyfus — “J’ accuse!” — only because he was a Jew.

It's All About the Votes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Trump-McConnell detente

That was some chaotic scene in the White House Rose Garden Monday. After lunch with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, President Trump assured combative reporters and the country that the two are getting along just fine, in spite of the Senate’s failure to repeal and replace Obamacare and an uncertain future over tax reform, the other Republican signature issue party members promised to get done.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell watches from the sidelines before an NFL football game between the Minnesota Vikings and Green Bay Packers in Minneapolis, Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Bruce Kluckhohn)

NFL missed golden opportunity

- The Washington Times

Commissioner Roger Goodell emerged from a meeting with NFL players and owners and announced, indirectly, that it was still A-OK to kneel for the national anthem. “We did not ask for that,” he said, in answer to a question about whether the league would demand players stand. And in so doing, the NFL has missed a golden opportunity to soothe and calm tensions.

Illustration on Mitch McConnell by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

More than just a swamp dweller

- The Washington Times

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell is regarded by most conservatives and Republicans outside Washington as the embodiment of all that’s wrong with Washington. A recent Harvard study found him the least popular of all nationally known political figures and a group of my fellow conservatives told him in an open letter that as far as they’re concerned, he is “the swamp.”

Illustration on the threat of hurricanes to the electrical grid by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Lights that a hurricane can’t blow out

With millions of Americans experiencing power outages due to catastrophic hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, there has never been a more important time to look critically at the reliability and durability of our electrical grid. In Puerto Rico, which has been devastated by Hurricane Maria, reports indicate that it will take months — or even as long as a year — for the power to be fully restored.

Illustration of Fethullah Gulen by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Fethullah Gulen, a pious Muslim or a radical Islamist?

Controversial Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen is back in the news following a diplomatic standoff between Turkey and the United States. On Oct. 8, the U.S. mission in Turkey announced a decision “to suspend all non-immigrant visa services at all U.S. diplomatic facilities in Turkey,” in retaliation for the arrest of a Drug Enforcement Administration liaison in Turkey with suspected ties to Mr. Gulen. Turkey has answered in kind by freezing the issuance of new visas.

Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., the ranking member of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, talks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The problem with Obamacare subsidies

Late last week, President Trump signed an executive order directing the secretaries of the Treasury and health and human services to cease making payments to health care insurance companies in behalf of the more than 6 million Americans who qualify for these payments under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, commonly known as Obamacare.

Claire McCaskill’s crusade could hurt Native American rights

Let’s establish an important legal concept and set the context. The legal term “sovereign immunity,” according to the Wex Legal Dictionary, means that “the government cannot be sued without its consent.” This doctrine has applied to the federal government, states, public universities and Native American tribes for many years.

Saving the nation from the left’s bullies

As we’ve all been understandably focused on Hollywood’s Weinstein dumpster fire, a number of stories have emerged exposing the left’s continuing culture war, despite its meltdown in the film industry.

Illustration on salvaging the U.S./Iran nuclear agreement by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump’s third way

President Trump made a tough call last week. European diplomats and an “echo chamber” in the mainstream media were insisting he “recertify” the nuclear weapons deal his predecessor concluded with Iran’s rulers in 2015.

The Clinton Protection Racquet Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary and Harvey’s shared fate

I have been fascinated by Harvey Weinstein’s initial response to charges that the Bathrobed Romeo sexually molested women. His statement was at once otherworldly and yet weirdly similar to Hillary Clinton’s eventual response to the scandal. I say “eventual response” because it took her over a week to comment. Obviously, Hillary’s lawyers and public relations magicians had to word her response very carefully.

Illustration on the failure to "contain" Russia by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How America has failed to contain Russia

Seventy years ago, George Kennan’s “Sources of Soviet Conduct” set the course for U.S. containment policy toward the Soviet Union. Following the Soviet Union’s collapse and a decade of economic turmoil which resulted in reduced Russian regional as well as global influence, President Vladimir Putin began implementing a national security strategy to resurrect Russia’s great power status. He wanted Russia to be perceived as equal in stature to the United States and to ensure western ideals of freedom, liberty, and democracy would not threaten his regime security.

Teaching the Birds and Bees at School Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How federally funded sex education sexualizes schoolchildren

Upon returning to middle school from an orthodontist appointment to tighten his braces, 12-year-old Johnny struggles through a pre-algebra lecture then schlepps off to his health class where he is instructed in anal sex, oral sex, masturbation and sexual fantasy.

William Dodd Jr. speaks on the radio during debate within the United States on whether to enter World War II. International News Service photo.

How Russians meddled in the 1938 election

Did Russia meddle in the 2016 presidential election? President Donald Trump emphatically says “no.” But the hierarchy of the U. S. intelligence community is equally firm in saying “yes.” With three probes in progress — two by Congress, another by an independent counsel — an answer perhaps will eventually be found.

Related Articles

'The only numinous thing in a dark and profane world'

Critics and booksellers who read advance copies of "My Absolute Darling" rave about it. "Few coming-of-age stories deliver [its] sheer lyrical power," writes the Library Journal in a starred review. "Cancel-your-plans good call-out-of-work," advises a bookseller from Mystic, Connecticut. "Ugly, beautiful, horrifying and uplifting," notes Stephen King, who says he will remember it forever.

Decertify Obama Iran deal now

During the 2016-election campaign, candidate Trump promised voters that one of his top priorities as president would be to repeal the 2015 Obama nuclear Iran deal. According to him, the deal is one of the worst and most one-sided transactions America has ever made.

Get China to control North Korea

China is our only leverage when it comes to modifying North Korea's world outlook, policies, actions and (possibly) leadership. But there is no reason for China to truly exert itself, regardless of current statements, because the United States' prolonged difficulties with an essentially minor player, North Korea, impair our credibility throughout the world and make China's expansionist plans easier to achieve.

Illustration on the Viet NAM war by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Facts 'The Vietnam War' left out

"The Vietnam War" series by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick is most certainly a TV tour de force replete with information which basically sought to confirm the view that the war, so costly in lives and treasure, was unwinnable and accomplished nothing.

Illustration on Saudi women being legally allowed to drive by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A death and a driver's license

Hugh Hefner dies at 91 and women in Saudi Arabia get royal permission to drive a car. These two markers separated by continents and cultures, one in the West and the other in the East, dramatically reflect the changing ways men and women relate to each other.

In this photo from files taken on Thursday, June. 29, 2017, a man is treated for a suspected cholera infection at a hospital in Sanaa, Yemen. The World Health Organization's emergencies chief, Dr. David Salama, said Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017 that the agency could have acted faster and sent more vaccines to fight a massive, deadly surge of cholera cases in war-battered Yemen this year. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed, File)

Setting the record straight on the Yemeni civil war

Yemen is in its third year of a civil war that started in March 2015, pitting Houthi rebels against the internationally recognized government of President Abdrabbuh Mansur Hadi, which is backed by a Saudi Arabia-led coalition consisting of Egypt, Bahrain, Kuwait, Sudan and the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

A wounded person is walked in on a wheelbarrow as Las Vegas police respond during an active shooter situation on the Las Vegas Strip in Las Vegas Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017. Multiple victims were being transported to hospitals after a shooting late Sunday at a music festival on the Las Vegas Strip. Photo by Chase Stevens/Las Vegas Review-Journal via Associated Press

The definition of evil

Responding to the recent Las Vegas concert shooting that killed more than 50 people and injured hundreds more, President Trump described the act as one "of pure evil."

Illustration on President Trump's waiving the Jones Act by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How to speed the reconstruction of Puerto Rico

When natural disasters hit, the last thing anyone wants is to make relief and rebuilding efforts harder and more expensive. Yet there is a century-old law on the books that does precisely that -- one that is frequently waived, but still hasn't been repealed. It would be better for all Americans if it were.

North Korea's Off Ramp Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Showing North Korea an off-ramp

North Korea will not agree to complete, verifiable and irreversible dismantlement of its nuclear weapons programs. Kim Jong-un has accomplished what his grandfather, Kim Il-sung, and his father, Kim Jong-il, were unable to accomplish: an arsenal of nuclear weapons and missiles capable of reaching as far as the United States.

Agents from the FBI continue to process evidence at the scene of a mass shooting on Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2017, in Las Vegas. Stephen Paddock opened fire on an outdoor music concert on Sunday killing dozens and injuring hundreds. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

Can the government keep the nation safe?

Here we go again. The United States has been rattled to the core by an unspeakable act of evil perpetrated by a hater of humanity. A quiet, wealthy loner rented a hotel suite in Las Vegas, armed it with shooting platforms and automatic weapons, knocked out two of the windows, and shot at innocents 32 floors below. Fifty-nine people were murdered, and 527 were injured.

Remembering a 1970s childhood

For many years, nostalgia in books and movies has been reserved for the 1950s and 1960s. Nostalgia for the 1970s has been limited to depictions of teenagers and young adults. Those who lived their childhoods in the 1970s have found their chronicler in Sports Illustrated writer Steve Rushin. His memoir, "Sting-Ray Afternoons," humorously and poignantly describes his youth and family life in Bloomington, Minn., a suburb of Minneapolis.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, right, and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan shake hands at the conclusion of their joint press conference at the Saadabad Palace in Tehran, Iran, Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2017. With Turkey's president by his side, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani pledged Wednesday that they would ensure borders in the region remain unchanged after the recent Kurdish independence referendum in Iraq. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)

The romantic lure of secession

Break-ups break hearts, but sometimes the thirst for freedom cannot be denied. When the desire to end a bad relationship involves the peoples of a nation, the process can become a bloody one. Americans don't have far to look to understand that. A century and a half after Appomattox the wounds of a civil war have not yet fully healed.

Former President Barack Obama waves to spectators before the first round of the Presidents Cup at Liberty National Golf Club in Jersey City, N.J., Thursday, Sept. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

Abuse by the administrative state

The spirit of the Obama administration lives -- only Barack Obama is gone -- in the bureaucracies that imagine they were established to harass taxpayers. One of these is the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, or the CFPB, one of the toxic vegetables in Washington's alphabet soup. Protecting the bureau, as the bureau sees it, is Job 1.

Too useful to fix

Immigration is a major reason why President Trump won the election. But it seems members of Congress still don't get it. The latest attempt, the Tillis/Lankford bill, does nothing to stop illegal immigration. If anything, it only encourages it and will likely increase chain migration as well.

Democracy fails in Catalan

As a supporter of democracy and self determination, I was glad that last Sunday the people of the Catalan region of Spain tried to vote for independence. Unfortunately the Spanish police cracked down in a most undemocratic way.

People embrace and bow their heads as nearby church bells ring during a vigil Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017, in Orlando, Fla., to show solidarity with the victims of the shooting in Las Vegas.  Authorities said Stephen Craig Paddock broke windows on a Las Vegas casino and began firing with a cache of weapons Sunday, killing dozens and injuring hundreds at a country music festival. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

Why gun control won't end mass murder

As the nation continues to reel from the nation's worst mass shooting in modern history, politicians and other opportunists find the massacre too inviting not to exploit. The knee-jerk cravenness of liberals to scrape up their calls for gun-control while demonizing the National Rifle Association (NRA) immediately sucks all the air out of the room, eliminating any discussion or investigation of other foundational forces driving mass violence.