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White House aide Sidney Blumenthal, shown in this video image, says during his Feb. 3, 1999, deposition that President Clinton lied to him. The videotape was part of House Manager Rep. James Rogan's, D-Calif., presentation in the Senate impeachment trial of President Clinton, Saturday, Feb. 6, 1999, in Washington. (AP Photo/APTN)

Flying as close to the flame as Hillary dares

- The Washington Times

Everything about the Clintons, both Hillary and Bubba, is a lie, including (to steal a memorable line from the author Mary McCarthy) the “a,” the “and,” and the “the.” Neither Bubba nor Hillary know how to tell the truth, but both of them are masters at spinning the lie.

Bloody Hand of ISIS in the Mideast Illustration by M Ryder

ISIS attacks on the West

The May 3 assault on a Muhammad cartoon contest in Garland, Texas, prompted much discussion about the assailants’ connections to the Islamic State, also know as ISIS, ISIL and Daesh. Did ISIS run them as agents? Are they part of a new network of terror in the West?

Illustration about the abuse of Sixth Amendment rights in misdemeanor cases by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Shining a light on 10 million criminal prosecutions

Adding to the growing momentum in Congress for bipartisan criminal justice reform, last week the Senate Judiciary Committee held a first-of-its-kind hearing to shine much-needed light on pervasive — and largely unexamined — problems in the largest segment of our criminal justice system. Republican Chairman Chuck Grassley of Iowa heard expert testimony describing widespread violations around the country of the Sixth Amendment right to legal counsel for Americans charged with misdemeanors.

Bringing Children into the World Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Are embryos persons or property?

Much of the media has ridiculed businessman Nick Loeb, the former fiance of actress Sofia Vergara, the star of the sitcom “Modern Family,” because he filed a lawsuit to prevent Ms. Vergara from destroying the frozen embryos they created together in 2013. But many in the pro-life community have rallied behind him, viewing the embryos that were created by Mr. Loeb and Ms. Vergara as persons deserving protection by the state.

**FILE** The sign for the National Labor Relations Board is seen outside the organization's headquarters in downtown Washington on July 17, 2013. (Associated Press)

Labor board overreach

Last month, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), stacked with Democratic appointees loyal to Big Labor, enacted new procedures to govern unionization elections.

Reform of the Criminal Justice System Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A ‘safety valve’ for mandatory minimum sentences

In the waning days of Maryland’s legislative session, casual observers were probably surprised to see a freshman, conservative Republican from Western Maryland leading the fight on the Senate floor to reform our state’s harsh mandatory minimum laws. In fact, I was joined by a majority of Republicans in the Senate in voting for this important reform.

Bill de Blasio     Associated Press photo

The false god of politics

Far-left politicians apparently believe that their philosophy is not receiving the worship it is due, despite a track record of failure.

Obama's economic legacy illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Omens from Obama’s crumbling economy

President Obama, looking for a legacy, may soon find himself running from one. Americans forgive few things less than a poor economic performance, and Mr. Obama has presided over one throughout his presidency. However, as 2015’s first-quarter results show a stalled economy that threatens to go into reverse, Mr. Obama could finally feel the fallout — not owing to just today’s economy, but his entire presidency’s.

Illustration on Justice Ginsburg's bias in the pending decision on homosexual marriage     The Washington Times

Partial to gay marriage

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is not an impartial jurist — not when it comes to the same-sex “marriage” cases, at least. Everyone knows it. Instead of giving confidence to the American public by being above reproach while the same-sex “marriage” cases are being considered, Justice Ginsburg is going out of her way to embarrass the court with unethical antics aimed at assuring pro-same-sex “marriage” supporters and humiliating opponents.

Martin O'Malley speaks with reporters during a roundtable interview at the Maryland State House in Annapolis, Jan. 16, 2015. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

When Hillary gets an unexpected spanking

- The Washington Times

The Democrats can run, to paraphrase Muhammad Ali’s rebuke of a timid opponent, but they can’t hide. Hillary Clinton is turning her campaign into a game of hide-and-seek, and the party is terrified. Some leading Democrats are beginning to say out loud what they have said privately for weeks.

A puzzling national defense illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Re-establishing a consensus on national defense

From al Qaeda to the Islamic State, we have learned to kill enemy leaders but not much else about basic issues of war and peace. Just last week, the media diverted attention from the scandals of Our Lady of Perpetual Ambition Hillary Rodham Clinton by asking Jeb Bush some really hard questions. Would he have done the Iraq War the same way as his brother — or at all?

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, left, shakes hands with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, Sunday, May 17, 2015.  Kerry was meeting Sunday with Chinese President Xi before heading to South Korea to complete a short Asian tour that has been clouded so far by concerns over China's construction in South China Sea. (Kim Kyung-Hoon/Pool Photo via AP)

A challenge to Chinese targeting of American firms

To supplement profits that have been hamstrung by slowing domestic growth, Western companies are turning to emerging markets with greater frequency. Participation in those markets, however, is not without risk; businesses face challenges ranging from corruption to unfair regulations and a host of other issues.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA $555K -The National Mall with the Lincoln Memorial, and Washington Monument are seen from the roof of the U.S. Capitol Building, on a brisk fall day in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2014. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

A ‘pivot’ toward Asian Americans

Presidential contenders of both parties are advised to should are advised to take note: The Asian American community is the nation’s fastest-growing demographic group, with China and India superseding Mexico as the countries of origin for recent immigrants, and members of this “model minority” are gradually overtaking their fellow Americans in education and income.

Related Articles

Nothing fortunate about success

Sen. Bernie Sanders, Vermont independent, will contest for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination as an unabashed class warrior. He will rail against the wealthy, notwithstanding that the majority of Americans, including those who pay no income tax at all, are opposed to punishing financial success by taxing income at confiscatory rates. Mr. Sanders is the leader of our progressive friends who insist on venting their enmity against the acquisition of wealth as if it were somehow un-American. I'm waiting for them to take on the Clintons on that score.

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks to the media about his agenda in running for president, Thursday, April 30, 2015, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Bernie Sanders may be a campaign underdog - but he's a historic campaign underdog

- The Washington Times

Americans, even Republicans, are willing witnesses for Sen. Bernie Sanders and his long-shot presidential bid. The hair, the gumption, the unapologetic ideology — all that could appeal to an audience trained to root for the underdog, just as they would a reality TV contestant determined to beat the odds. The Vermont Independent is a cultural force to be reckoned with. Will he also be a political force?

Carly Fiorina speaks at the Republican Leadership Summit in Nashua, N.H., in this April 18, 2015, file photo. The former technology executive formally entered the 2016 presidential race on Monday.  (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

An unusual field crowds the Republican pool

- The Washington Times

It's spring, and the water must be fine, because everybody's jumping in. Carly Fiorina leaped in Monday with Ben Carson, and Mike Huckabee will follow Tuesday. Republicans have never had such diversity.

Demonstrators cheer in the intersection of West North and Pennsylvania Avenues in Baltimore on Saturday, May 2, 2015, one of the sites of Monday's rioting, as they march a day after charges were announced against the police officers involved in Freddie Gray's death. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Sticks, stones and thugs

The reputation of the police in Baltimore has taken a beating in the wake of the rioting. Six policemen have been charged with crimes, though it is important to remember that they are charged — not indicted, and not yet convicted of anything. Nevertheless, some people with nothing better to do are eager to dispatch the Word Police to make further arrests.

FILE - This May 1, 1944 file photo shows Stars and Stripes artist Sgt. Bill Mauldin sketching Pvt. Robert L. Bowman, left, of Hogansville, Ga., on the Anzio beachhead in Italy during World War II. Two dozen original editorial cartoons created by Mauldin, a Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist and World War II veteran are set to hit the auction block as part of a major comic art auction in Beverly Hills, Calif. A native of New Mexico, Bill Mauldin became known during World War II for his Willie and Joe characters. He lifted the spirits of U.S. soldiers through the cartoons, which used edgy humor to depict the horrors of war. (AP Photo/File)

Dissing the vets

Maybe we don't need a return to the draft but we surely need to demand some form of national service.

Hope denied in Baltimore

When young men riot, as they did in Baltimore last week, it is the police on whom we depend to restore order. But how do we expect this to be done? What were these police actually to do?

The North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un does not appear interested in holding sincere talks on giving up his nuclear arms. (Associated Press)

The powder keg in Northeast Asia

The world's attention is focused on the chaos of the Middle East, but a time bomb is ticking in northeast Asia. Mysterious, heavily armed North Korea is a threat that at the moment seems out of sight, but it cannot be out of mind.

British election pie illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Unruly Britannia

They called it "Question Time," borrowing the term from the prime minister's weekly appearance in the House of Commons, but this was surprisingly and refreshingly different.

Hanseatic shield illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Lessons from the Hanseatic League

Last week, there were reports in the Swedish and Finnish press about what was presumed to be a Russia submarine probing the harbors in both Stockholm and Helsinki. This was not viewed as a serious Russian threat but merely an extension of the general and low-level harassment the Russians have displayed against their European neighbors, particularly the Baltic nations.

Clinton, Lerner apologize? Hardly

Hillary Clinton and Lois Lerner must have attended the same school of political etiquette and situational ethics ("IRS still targeting tea party," Page I, May 1). Deleted e-mails, the modern equivalent of dragging a branch to erase footprints in the dust, has ill-served both women because modern technology can follow their nefarious tracks.

Root of Baltimore's problems

How can a city that once served as the U.S. capital and was the backdrop inspiration of our national anthem dissolve into riots ("How to run a great city into the ground," Web, May 4)? Baltimore boasts the 11th busiest port in the United States and the 22nd busiest airport, and it is home to very successful Major League Baseball and National Football League teams. It has the showcase Inner Harbor with all its trappings to entertain tourists, visitors and residents. I can only imagine that countless U.S. cities would be giddy with these economic attributes. So what's not to like? I can only point to the failed school system as the root of the problem.

"It's time we end the era of mass incarceration," Hillary Rodham Clinton said in a speech at Columbia University in New York, which was the first major address of her White House run. (Associated Press)

The real Hillary Clinton problem

The qualities Americans associate with effective political leadership in general and with female leaders in particular do not match up with the popular perception of Hillary Clinton.

Former President Bill Clinton, left, listens as former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks during a student conference for the Clinton Global Initiative University at Arizona State University. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)

American Conservative Union has five questions of its own for Hillary Clinton

- The Washington Times

"Clinton's lack of candor, and repeated attempts to distract or hide truths from the American people have raised questions that deserve answers. At some point, Mrs. Clinton will have to answer questions about how and why she and her husband appear to have rigged the system to their political and financial benefit," says American Conservative Union chairman Matt Schlapp.

How to run a great city into the ground

All around us failed Democratic leadership is insisting on being recognized. As Baltimore, a great American city, teeters on a precipice, media and politicians still tiptoe around the truth, knowing if reality was actually acknowledged, the entire liberal narrative would collapse.

Elizabeth and Hillary 1 percent illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton bows to the far left

The next election is 20 months away but Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is already sharpening her class-warfare guillotine in order to rev up her party's far-left voting base.

Tim Bostic, left, and Tony London hold hands during the introduction of their wedding ceremony at Christ & St. Luke’s Episcopal Church for their wedding ceremony on  Saturday, May 2, 2015 in Norfolk, Va. Tim and Tony who have been a couple for 25 years are co-plaintiffs in the case that ultimately granted marriage rights to same sex couples in Virginia. (The' N. Pham/The Virginian-Pilot via AP)  MAGS OUT

Civil rights and wrongs

While the U.S. Supreme Court held an Alice-in-Wonderland session on the nature and value of marriage, one of the nation's largest cities lay partly in ruins over the death of a black man in police custody.