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Smoking Gun Flash Drive Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Rohrabacher-Assange meeting

- The Washington Times

California Rep. Dana Rohrabacher’s recent three-hour meeting with WikiLeaks head Julian Assange as reported earlier this week by The Hill may prove interesting in light of the allegations of several former high-ranking U.S. intelligence analysts that the Democratic National Committee was not hacked by the Russians or anyone else prior to last fall’s presidential election.

Illustration on the results of automatic voter registration law by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Guarding election integrity

In 1993, when President Clinton signed the National Voter Registration Act (NVRA), its boosters claimed that it would solve, once and for all, a plethora of problems plaguing the nation’s voter registration rolls.

The Extinction of the Republican Party Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Replacing the Republican Party

Having refused to repeal Obamacare, the Republican Party is dead, as was the Whig Party in 1854 after it colluded in the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act which opened these territories to slavery.

Illustration on Putin's long-term strategy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Putin’s strategy and the U.S. response

At the end of the Cold War, Russia was a facsimile of itself. Shorn of empire, the Russians appeared to be a weak regional power, if that.

Trump’s record on race

One lesson I’ve learned from working for Donald Trump is that you have to pay attention to what he does, not what he says. The left and the media are on a rampage accusing President Trump of being a racist and Nazi-KKK sympathizer because of his words in response to the horrid events in Charlottesville.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Democrats search for another Lost Cause

- The Washington Times

Union scouts have already discovered Robert E. Lee at the gates of the city, lining up the gallant Pelham’s artillery to fire the opening round, and Stonewall Jackson and Jeb Stuart are expected to arrive on a night train from the Shenandoah Valley.

Illustration on diplomatic options for North Korea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘Red-teaming’ the diplomatic option in Korea

Should President Trump meet personally with Kim Jong-un? John Glover, a graduate student at George Mason University wrote an article advocating such a meeting and, frankly, I think that he’s on to something.

Trump's Go-ahead for Infrastructure Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Repairing, updating and expanding infrastructure

One of the biggest barriers to investment in infrastructure all across the United States is the long, costly, and unpredictable permitting process. If you have any doubts, just consider the Keystone XL pipeline extension.

Hatred of the Jews returns with a flourish

Anti-Semitism and white supremacy are far from dead in the United States of America. That’s what this past weekend’s violence told the world.

Illustration on men and women in the workplace and attitudes on gender roles by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Scapegoats, dupes and gulls

Identity politics has gone over the top, and the flood of intolerance is drenching everyone. What began as a campaign to re-right injustice has created injustice. What was meant to change attitudes toward intolerance has become intolerance enthroned.

Illustration on North Korea's backing down by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Armageddon postponed

North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un appears to have blinked and President Trump can claim a foreign policy victory and justification for his strategy.

Tom Lever, 28, and Aaliyah Jones, 38, both of Charlottesville, put up a sign that says "Heather Heyer Park" at the base of the Confederate general Robert E. Lee monument in Emancipation Park Tuesday, Aug. 15 in Charlottesville, Va.  Alex Fields Jr., is charged with second-degree murder and other counts after authorities say he rammed his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, including Heyer, Saturday, where a white supremacist rally took place.  (AP Photo/Julia Rendleman)

Charlottesville and the loss of America’s sanity

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump, bombarded in a speech on infrastructure with repetitive and aggressive questions about Charlottesville, made clear — again — that violence, bigotry and racism in all its many forms, in all its various shapes, were not to be tolerated. He dared to defend his initial Charlottesville comments, and for that, the mainstream media has determined, he must die.

Illustration on the challenges of setting standards for selective immigration policy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Immigration reform for a more prosperous America

America’s immigration policy sorely needs modernization. By endorsing reforms offered by Sens. Tom Cotton and David Perdue, President Trump offers Congress an opportunity to better consider how new arrivals can contribute to national prosperity.

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Former Vice President Al Gore. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

When life gets tough for just about everybody

- The Washington Times

Life is tough, as the man said, and three out of three people die. It's apparently a lot worse than we thought. The world is coming apart at the seams, just like the naysayers said it would. Times have got so tough that you can't even trust fake news.

Confirmation of Christopher Wray as FBI Director Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A steady hand in an unsteady time

The FBI is the premier investigative agency in the world, with more than 35,000 agents and staff working all around the globe. The men and women of the FBI work diligently to disrupt and prevent terrorist attacks on America and to preserve the liberties of all Americans by upholding and enforcing the rule of law.

A famed novelist and his fatal hubris

You've really got to respect a novelist's biographer who begins his book with a quote like this from its subject: "Scott Fitzgerald once wrote, 'There never was a good biography of a novelist. There couldn't be. He is too many people if he is any good.' "

Get rid of RINOs

We currently have a small number of RINOS blocking the president's agenda — and the leadership does nothing. It's time play hardball, stop the talk and take action. First, strip those RINOS of their influential committee and chairmanship assignments. Second, let them know that there will be no Republican funds for them when they run for reelection. Lastly, change the archaic rules of the Senate and let those who oppose know we won, you lost. President Obama did it.

Empower states to end Obamacare

I have followed Obamacare since its inception and now realize its purpose was to empower the federal government with our health care. That didn't work because it violated the Constitution. To reverse Obamacare, the Republicans must do the opposite: empower the states. That should be the premise and theme of the Republican health-care bill.

Trying again with secession

If at first you don't succeed, secede. That's the latest message from California, where the idea of breaking up with the United States is the current rage. With Donald Trump in the White House attempting to "make America great again," the idea of returning to an era of freedom, faith and family is as antithetical to the cool crowd as a blue-light special at Kmart. The farther the Left Coast travels down the road toward "Calexit," the harder the climb back into the good graces of Americans for whom California is not as cool as it once was.

Not even blood relatives came to their aid

It is nearly a century since Nicholas II, Czar of All the Russias until his abdication in March 1917, was murdered along with his wife, four daughters, hemophiliac son, his doctor and assorted servants in the cellar of a house in Ekaterinburg, a city east of the Ural mountains.

Illustration on Trump's positive impact on the economy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Trump Economy

Well finally we are getting that "Summer of recovery." The July jobs report was a blockbuster — solid job gains across the economy, lowest unemployment rate in more than a decade, and a nice bump up in wages.

Resetting the foreign policy agenda

The Trump administration with a new chief of staff, Gen. John Kelly, has a unique opportunity to reset its agenda and fulfill its campaign promises. The firing of Anthony Scaramucci as White House communications director by the new chief of staff, was a step in the right direction. Clearly, the next order of business must be a purge of all Obama holdover "undercover agents" from not only the National Security Council (NSC) but from all government agencies.

Illustration on limiting health care by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Limiting health care by the numbers

When Sen. John McCain returned to Washington recently and stepped onto the Senate floor following a diagnosis of brain cancer, the affection and admiration from both sides of the aisle was clear. Expect this bipartisan goodwill to endure even following his controversial vote killing the "skinny repeal" of Obamacare.

Illustration on the history of the Purple Heart medal by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How the Purple Heart came to be

When my brother returned from World War II with a Purple Heart decoration as a result of the wounds he sustained in fighting the Nazis in Germany, I was 8 years old. He let me show my friends the decoration and we were awestruck each time with the bright gold medallion. Writing about its origins now as an historian is a singular honor.

'War' on police a cry for justice

There is no war on cops ("Why the war on cops is a war on all of us," Web, July 19). There is no "guerrilla action" being taken against our country's police force by the political left. And there is no widespread campaign to paint all law-enforcement officers with the same brush. But there is criticism. And it's largely fair.