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No substitute for seriousness in Iraq

A recent weekend brought two very different dispatches from the front lines of the global war on terror. The first was a tale of tactical success; the second a narrative of strategic failure.

Positive Messages Hit the Mark Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Conservatism, the Chevy of American leadership

Imagine General Motors trying to sell you a Chevy truck by airing an ad featuring a Ford F-150 pickup truck bursting into flames, killing a family of four and ending with anguished relatives waiting for news of their loved ones in a hospital emergency room.

Illustration on adjusting Section 215 of the Patriot Act by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Amending the Patriot Act, not ending it

The Senate, which will never be known for an overly demanding work schedule, returns from its week-long recess a whole day early to deal with the mess being made of one of our most important anti-terrorist intelligence programs. That program, now encompassed by Section 215 of the unfortunately named Patriot Act, has its roots in the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978, or FISA.

Illistration on adjusting Export-Import bank policies by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A Reaganesque solution to the Ex-Im Bank dilemma

Opposition to the U.S. Export-Import Bank (Ex-Im) is now at the point where the bank’s reauthorization is genuinely in doubt. Spurred by accusations of corporate welfare, crony capitalism and outright corruption, opponents believe the Ex-Im Bank’s palpable violation of free-market principles fully warrants its early demise.

This undated colorized transmission electron micrograph image made available by the CDC shows an Ebola virus virion. For the first time, Ebola has been discovered inside the eyes of a patient months after the virus was gone from his blood, according to a report published in the New England Journal of Medicine on Thursday, May 7, 2015. (Frederick Murphy/CDC via AP)

A little good news about Ebola

- The Washington Times

The news from Africa and the Third World is seldom good, and much of the bad news is about disease born of ignorance, superstition and primitive sanitation, news dispatched by a media addicted to tales of unrelieved gloom, certain doom and inevitable disaster.

Unions Helped by Obama Appointees Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Keeping workers in the dark

Two of Sen. Harry Reid’s controversial legislative maneuvers are coming back to haunt American workers. In 2013, then-Majority Leader Reid’s threat to eviscerate the judicial filibuster cowed enough Senate Republicans to approve Big Labor’s handpicked candidates to the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). A few months later, Mr. Reid acted on his threat to gut the filibuster and installed three of President Obama’s nominees on the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals.

Missing world leader by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Making the JV team of world leaders

British Prime Minister David Cameron’s recent stunning victory for his Conservative party catapulted him to one of the three top Western world leaders, alongside Germany’s Angela Merkel and France’s Francois Hollande. Mr. Cameron wasn’t supposed to win for numerous reasons, not the least of which because of his austerity policies and vigorous opposition from Labor and Liberal parties that thought a bigger government was the key to Britain’s growth.

Illustration on missing Muldovan bank funds by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Who took Moldova’s millions — the crooks or the Kremlin?

On the eve of a national election in tiny Moldova last November, $450 million — equal to 10 percent of the Eastern European country’s entire annual gross domestic product — went missing. So far, no one knows where it went.

Export-Import Bank Providing Corporate Welfare Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Chamber of Corporate Welfare

Here’s a half-serious question: How much do taxpayers have to pay off Boeing to make the Export-Import Bank — finally and irrevocably — go away? If the feds wrote a check to Boeing for $100 million, would they then let the Ex-Im Bank die a merciful and long overdue death?

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Illustration on strategies to spread Western culture to the Islamic world by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Girding for the long haul of terror

Two seemingly unconnected recent events but in reality intimately connected are sure signs that the war on terrorism is being lost.

Taiwan should be party to TPP

There are many good reasons for President Obama to scold Democrats on their trade-pact stance, but the president has yet to convince lawmakers that a regional free-trade agreement without Taiwan would be unthinkable ("Liberal opposition mounts to free-trade deal," 2, May 8). If this regional system is going to cover all 50-plus countries around the Pacific Rim, the absence of Taiwan will render the regional integration disadvantageous to American interests.

Yale University students wear a variety of head coverings during Class Day at Yale in New Haven (AP Photo/Jessica Hill)

Conservatives not welcome: Liberal speakers dominate college commencements by six-to-one

- The Washington Times

Conservatives are essentially unwelcome on the annual college commencement speaker circuit, when politicians, the famous and infamous don a graduation robe, and interesting hat and make a speech. According to the Young America's Foundation's annual survey of speakers at the nation's top 100 universities, liberal speakers more than dominated the field. Among the top 100 campuses: liberal speakers outnumber conservatives 6-to-1.

Illustration on love, forgiveness and racial harmony by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

An invisible thread

A single act of kindness crossed racial, socio-economic, gender and generational lines---and reverberated for decades.

An interview between Bloomberg News managing editor and Sen. Ted Cruz has raised some questions. (Washington Times)

Authenticity challenge: Ted Cruz asked to prove he's 'Cuban' - controversy ensues, apology issued

- The Washington Times

Analysts and journalists are still puzzling over the recent interview between Bloomberg News managing editor Mark Halperin and Sen. Ted Cruz. The Texas Republican and Cuban-American was subjected to a string of inquiries about his taste in Cuban food and music, his ability to speak Spanish and other matters that had no real place in the political discourse.

FBI crime scene investigators document evidence outside the Curtis Culwell Center, Monday, May 4, 2015, in Garland, Texas. Two men opened fire with assault weapons on police Sunday night who were guarding a contest for Muslim Prophet Muhammed cartoons. A police officer returned fire killing both men. (AP Photo/Brandon Wade)

Jihadis' demand for self-censorship would spell the end of free expression

Two Islamist terrorists were dead and a police officer wounded in the aftermath of the "Draw Muhammad" cartoon contest in Garland, Texas. Despite what many would like you to think, it wasn't the cartoons presented at this private gathering or the event itself that should concern Americans -- it's the blaming of the victim by many in the media, including some conservative favorites.

"The Dadly Virtues" by Jonathan Last will be on book shelves on May 18. (Templeton Press)

The Dadly Virtues: Conservative journalists gather to show the nation how to father

- The Washington Times

The conservative menfolk are gathering on Monday with much on their minds: their children. The group - prominent journalists, mainly - meet at the American Enterprise Institute in the nation's capital to talk over a forthcoming book on fatherhood. All have contributed to it. The book? That would be "The Dadly Virtues: Adventures from the Worst Job You'll Ever Love" by Jonathan Last, a senior writer at The Weekly Standard. He brings a few of his creative buddies to join him on the podium - P.J. O'Rourke, Jonah Goldberg, Steve Hayes, James Lileks, Tucker Carlson - to name a few. A total of 17 conservative father/journalists contributed to the work.

U.N. peacekeepers media-friendly

"U.N. proves major threat to press freedom" by Drew Johnson (Web, May 3) claims that in September 2014, U.N. Peacekeeping Chief Herve Ladsous prevented reporters from filming a media engagement in Sudan. Writer Drew Johnson also alleges that Mr. Ladsous canceled the briefing when efforts to prevent filming proved ineffective.

Police officers just doing jobs

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has called for a federal investigation into her own police department. This is an obvious attempt to deflect from her sheer incompetence and the bad decisions she made during the recent riots.

In this Jan. 23, 2013, file photo, then-Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, on the deadly September attack on the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi, Libya, that killed Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three other Americans. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

Hillary Clinton's Benghazi testimony could break her presidential aspirations

"The Clintons" is the longest-running soap opera in American politics. Bill and Hillary have seemed to be immune from the accountability demanded of others. Perhaps they're protected by scandal because scandal is what everyone expects from them. This defense will be put to the test when a judgment day, such as it may be, arrives the week of May 18 and she will be asked to answer questions from Congress about what happened at Benghazi, and her part in organizing the American response.

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron speaks to the media outside 10 Downing Street in London, Friday, May 8, 2015. Cameron's Conservative Party swept to power Friday in Britain's Parliamentary General Elections, winning an unexpected majority.  (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

David Cameron's majority in Britain gives him an edge to manage

Nothing is more fun for voters than confounding pollsters, and not just here in America. Britain, too, and they gave Prime Minister David Cameron the majority he needs to preside over the government as he thinks fit. While they were at it, they told the pollsters to beat it, and take their computer models, intrusive questions and smug self-confidence with them.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Operation Nemesis: The Assassination Plot That Avenged the Armenian Genocide'

Vengeance is born when justice dies. "Operation Nemesis" is the gripping tale of how a small, ruthlessly determined group of Armenians hunted down the architects of the Ottoman Empire's World War I program of organized mass murder, specifically intended to eliminate a people, the Armenians, who had lived in Anatolia and other parts of the Ottoman Empire for thousands of years.

Illustration on oil's practical superiority to so-called green energy sources by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Promoters of renewable energy failed to account for the return of cheap oil

The green energy movement in America is dead. May it rest in peace. No, a majority of American energy over the next 20 years is not going to come from windmills and solar panels. One important lesson to be learned from the green energy fad's rapid and expensive demise is that central planning doesn't work.

Illustration on the aims of an Arab summit by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Obama will reject any pact at Arab summit that could threaten his Iran nuclear deal

In a Camp David summit meeting Thursday, leaders of Saudi Arabia and other Arab nations will attempt to persuade President Obama to enter into a military agreement to counteract the inevitable consequences of his nuclear weapons deal with Iran. This is their final opportunity to do so before the scheduled June 30 completion of that agreement.

Republican presidential hopeful Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., waves to supporters as he arrives to speak at a rally at Arizona State University Friday, May 8, 2015, in Tempe, Ariz. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

Age counts: 92 percent of Americans prefer a presidential candidate under 60

- The Washington Times

How old is too old to run for president? Americans have an age range in mind. Consider that the current crop of presidential hopefuls ranges in age from 43 to 75 -- and in the middle is Gov. Scott Walker checking in at 47, Martin O'Malley at 53, Jeb Bush at 63, Hillary Clinton at 67. But now there's a YouGov poll revealing what age Americans actually prefer.