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Sharpton in Ferguson Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A collection of race hustlers

Circumstances surrounding the events of the shooting death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., on Aug. 9 continue to unfold and dominate national headlines. A family, community and country have been captivated by the events that evolve daily.

Secure Texas Borders Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When foreign terrorism comes home

Their pitiless email to James Foley’s grieving parents was as brutal as the Islamic State’s video of his beheading by a black-clad, knife-wielding executioner.

Rev. Al Sharpton speaks at a rally at Greater Grace Church, Sunday, Aug. 17, 2014, for Michael Brown who was killed by police, last Saturday in Ferguson, Mo. Brown's shooting in the middle of a street, following a suspected robbery of a box of cigars from a nearby market, has sparked a week of protests, riots and looting in the St. Louis suburb. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

KNIGHT: Four approaches to Ferguson

Following the shooting death of 18-year-old black robbery suspect Michael Brown by a white police officer on Aug. 9, four distinctly different groups descended upon the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson, Mo.

Sports Drive the National Discourse Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When sports drive the national discourse

Walk down the entranceway of the Farragut West Metro Station in Washington, D.C., and you’ll see an interesting poster hanging on the wall. Part of an ad campaign for the Washington Metro Area Transit Authority, the poster shows two men at a bowling alley, conversing.

Sharing Cypriot Natural Resources Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

ERDENGIZ: Building a bicommunal solution on Cyprus

At a time when, in the words of former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright, “the world is a mess,” it’s disturbing to see and read ugly depictions of Cyprus as though it’s a war zone.

EDITORIAL: Licensing unemployment

Janet Yellen has a knack for understatement. The chairman of the Federal Reserve said Friday that the recession might have “caused persistent changes in the labor market’s functioning.” That’s a polite way of telling the millions in the unemployment line to get used to it.

Face-to-face with an evil enemy

There can be only one response to the barbaric beheading of American journalist James Foley by Islamic State terrorists. We must hunt them down and kill them.

Related Articles

Illustration on Obama's corporate tax antipathy toward business by Jennifer Kohnke/Tribune Content Agency

Derailing the tax-reform train

There's a much bigger, largely untold story behind the renewed debate over U.S. corporations who merge with foreign firms to reduce their federal tax bills.

Three Choices Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Sanitizing Islam in textbooks

When shocking events happen, it is worthwhile to consider how future generations will retell them.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks to gathered participants at the annual gathering of the Clinton Global Initiative America, at the Sheraton Downtown, in Denver, Tuesday, June 24, 2014. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

America likes tell-alls: 60 'best sellers' on the Clintons written since 1992

- The Washington Times

There are three books on the current New York Times top-10 bestseller list that that have something to do with Bill and Hillary Clinton. Those who seek to write a best seller - or even just a snappy paperback with a cool cover - might consider penning something on the Clintons, for better or worse. The numbers back this idea up.

Illustration on the broken Senate by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

TURNER: The Senate Democrats and the obsolescence of Congress

Obsolete. This is what the United States Congress will be if the Democrats keep up their current modus operandi. Democrats cannot, or will not, see the forest for the trees as they relentlessly pursue their agenda for fundamental change. Democrats, especially the Senate Democrats under Majority Leader Harry Reid, are governing by omission, consequentially leaving their job to the executive authority of the president.

Union Intimidation of Day care Provider Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A breath of employee freedom

When the Supreme Court ruled last month that public-sector unions were not allowed to extract dues from payments to home care and child care providers, it was more than a victory for Illinois provider Pamela Harris.

Mao Zedong

Something heroic for Obama's legacy

- The Washington Times

Unless he can find something and find it quickly, Barack Obama isn't going to like his legacy. The man who once walked on water may soon find himself at the bottom of the lake.

How the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution became a model

Fifty years ago Sunday, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Gulf of Tonkin resolution that authorized him, in the wake of reported North Vietnamese assaults on an American destroyer, to "take all necessary measures to repel an armed attack against the forces of the United States and to prevent further aggression."

BOOK REVIEW: 'Stand Up Straight and Sing'

Jessye Norman is not exactly your typical diva. To begin with, she graduated not from Juilliard or Curtis, but from Howard University, and proudly maintains her ties there.

Secretary of State John Kerry, left, talks with Chad President Idriss Deby Itno at the State Department in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 6, 2014, during the US African Leaders Summit. President Barack Obama and dozens of African leaders opened talks Wednesday on two key issues that threaten to disrupt economic progress on the continent: security and government corruption. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

What Africa doesn't need from us

What Africa needs is industry, power and, most of all, something to eat. Nearly 30 percent of the world's 842 million hungry live on the continent, and John F. Kerry wants to issue each of them a carbon credit.