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President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting on domestic and international human trafficking, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. With Trump are Michelle DeLaune, center, National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, and Dina Powell, right, White House Senior Counselor for Economic Initiatives. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Trumpspeak, a language rich in adjectives

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump isn’t the carrier of the disease that threatens the language, but he suffers with enthusiasm. His abuse of the adjective might eventually threaten his foreign policy.

Illustration on immigration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘I am an immigrant’

I have a Masters in International Relations, speak four languages and served as a politician in my country, the Republic of Georgia. I am also an immigrant.

Playing the xenophobic card

- The Washington Times

Last week, The New York Times detailed President Donald Trump’s press conference, and wrote: “A Jewish reporter got to ask Trump a question, it didn’t go well.”

The Genesis of Despicable Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Being a ‘deplorable’

Who among us can’t at some point relate to what it feels like to be an “irredeemable deplorable,” a term coined in the heat of a campaign but with far greater implications now. Whether we are religious or not, whether we pray or not, whether we are political activists or not, many of us know what it feels like to be mocked to the point of less than “other” status.

Illustration of Ajit Pai by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A new champion for internet choice

One of President Trump’s less publicized appointments also happens to be one of his best: Ajit Pai as the new chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is a cause for celebration.

Illustration on the 9th Circuit court by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Reining in a hysterical judiciary

On Feb. 9, a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit issued a ruling upholding the temporary restraining order against enforcement of President Trump’s Executive Order 13769.

Illustration on the complexities of dealing with illegal immigration by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The labyrinth of illegal immigration

Activists portray illegal immigration solely as a human story of the desperately poor from south of the border fleeing misery to start new, productive lives in the United States — despite exploitation and America’s nativist immigration laws.

Black Leadership Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Enlightened, inspired black leadership

After having been assigned to the United States Military Academy at West Point, one becomes acutely aware of the critical role leadership plays in solving challenging social problems. As an African-American, with that experience, I cannot not but consider the role black leadership plays in addressing African-American issues.

Illustration on domestic spying by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

The spooks have come home to roost

Last week, The Wall Street Journal revealed that members of the intelligence community — part of the deep state, the unseen government within the government that does not change with elections — now have acquired so much data on everyone in America that they can selectively reveal it to reward their friends and harm their foes. Their principal foe today is the president of the United States.

The Annual Academy Liberal Awards Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How not to embarrass Oscar

When you give your acceptance speeches, thank your publicist, limo driver, manicurist, masseuse, day nanny, night nanny and weekend nanny. Your attorney Marty Singer for killing that salacious National Enquirer story.

Illustration on the need to clean house at U.S. intelligence agencies by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Rousting the anti-Flynn cabal

In the anti-Trump media war, it is nearly impossible to keep the names straight without a scorecard. Barely had Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn’s name faded from the news cycle than he was replaced by H.R. McMaster, another lieutenant general most Americans have never heard of. Will this latest general be any more fortunate than his predecessor? Only if he can overcome the frenzied machinations of the Obama deep state.

President Donald Trump, right, speaks as Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, left, listens at Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Fla., Monday, Feb. 20, 2017, where Trump announced that McMaster will be the new national security adviser. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

The downside of a Trump tariff

When word got out in January 1848 that gold had been discovered at Sutter’s Mill in Coloma, California, near Sacramento, it triggered the famous California Gold Rush, which in a few short years brought some 300,000 fortune seekers to the territory, whose population at the time was just 155,000, most of them Native Americans.

Attack on the Earth by the Evil Empire Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Time’s misreading of science

As demonstrated by the confirmation hearings of Scott Pruitt for new Environmental Protection Agency chief, all-out war is being waged against the Trump administration by leftists who believe science is under attack from the evil empire.

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Illustration on Trump's beginnings on Obamacare repeal by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Repeal and replace

Whether campaigning for Congress or actually being in control, Republicans have a tradition of overpromising and underdelivering. Expected now to deliver on their promise, made in loud and brave voice, to repeal and replace Obamacare, some of the Republicans seem determined to live up to the reputation made over the decades.

George Orwell

'1984': Making liberals great again

- The Washington Times

Are the kids finally waking up and after decades of blithe ignorance and deciding to finally educate themselves about social studies? Are they suddenly "woke" to the ancient questions such as "Who should govern?" and "Where do rights come from?"

Illustration on standards for U.S. immigration in light of Islamist terrorism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Border disputes

Al Qaeda does not value diversity and it's not an equal opportunity employer. The same can be said of the Islamic State. And when the rulers of the Islamic Republic of Iran want to commit an act of terrorism -- the bombing of the U.S. Marine barracks in Beirut in 1983, to take just one example -- they are likely to give the assignment to members of Hezbollah, a radical Islamic group of the Shia persuasion. They are highly unlikely to recruit Unitarians, Mormons or Baha'i.

Illustration on the restoration of religious freedom in the U.S. after Obama by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Religious freedom can be restored

In its most recent "Two Minutes Hate" on President Trump, The Nation magazine's hyperbolic headline warned, "Leaked Draft of Trump's Religious Freedom Order Reveals Sweeping Plans to Legalize Discrimination." Claiming that if signed, the president's order "would create wholesale exemptions for people and organizations who claim religious objections to same sex marriage, premarital sex, abortion and trans identity, The Nation predicts that the order would "exceed the authority of executive branch," and "risk violating the Establishment Clause of the first Amendment to the Constitution."

In this photo provided by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, DNA Learning Center Assistant Director Amanda McBrien looks on as World of Enzymes camp participants set up apparatus for gel electrophoresis in Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. (Chun-hua Yang/Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory via AP)

Missouri models Wisconsin on labor reform

When Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker signed Act 10 in 2011, he did more than place taxpayers and public employees above entrenched union interests. On a personal level, that moment "started his conservative ascent," according to The New York Times, and he became the man Rush Limbaugh called "a demonstrated, genuine hero and potential star" in the Republican Party.

China and America, and the romance of history's oddest couple

Trying to understand China has been compared to gazing into jade. Cloudy and yet softly glowing, jade, in the words of the great Japanese novelist and essayist Tanizaki Junichiro, "quite lacks the brightness of a ruby or an emerald or the glitter of a diamond. But this much we can say: When we see that shadowy surface, we think how Chinese it is, we seem to find in cloudiness the accumulated sediment of the long Chinese past, we think how appropriate it is that the Chinese should admire that surface and that shadow."

Protecting the Homeland Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Border security means that entering is privilege, not a right

"Being able to come to America is a privilege, not a right," White House spokesmen Sean Spicer said at a recent news conference. Mr. Spicer defended President Trump's order that would halt Syrian refugees indefinitely, block all refugee admissions for four months and ban citizens of seven countries -- Iran, Iraq, Somalia, Syria, Sudan, Libya and Yemen -- from entering the United States for at least 90 days.

American Sattelite Technology Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Aerospace sector can make America great again

SpaceX just launched 10 Iridium Communications satellites into low-Earth orbit. These satellites will beam phone and data service to tens of thousands of Americans who live or work in areas too remote for regular cellphone coverage.

Ain't seen nothing yet

President Trump's defensive action is mild compared to what Israel does to protect its citizens ("Former U.S. officials: Trump travel ban could endanger troops, 'do long-term damage,'" Web, Feb. 6).

President Donald Trump, center, waves to military service members after arriving on Air Force One at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., on Monday, Feb. 6, 2017. (Octavio Jones/Tampa Bay Times via AP)

Resisting the 'resistance'

The drums of conflict grow louder by the day. Never-Trump demonstrators and their rioting factions are mustering their forces to mortally wound Donald Trump's presidency before it gains further momentum. The battle is broader than opposition to an unconventional chief executive.

President Donald Trump salutes a Marines honor guard as he disembarks from Marine One upon arrival at the White House in Washington, Monday, Feb. 6, 2017, from a trip to Florida. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

A time to chill

The spirit of Rodney Dangerfield no longer stands alone. The comedian who complained that "I don't get no respect" now speaks for just about everybody. In modern America, "nobody gets no respect."

Free speech for all, not just some

Having taught at the University of California, Berkeley many years ago, I know exactly where last Tuesday's riots occurred, as I crossed Sproul Plaza regularly ("Trump floats cutting off federal funds after Berkeley riots," Web, Feb. 2). Further, as a very, very old-fashioned liberal, I believe that the true heart of a high-quality liberal arts education is exposure to and engagement with a wide variety of ideas covering all points of view.

Marine Le Pen (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Exporting the example of the new American revolution

- The Washington Times

The voice of the chicken, like the voice of the turtle, is heard in the land and it's making a fearsome racket, on final approach to the roost. The established order has been turned upside down in a flutter of fine feathers. The unmentionables and the deplorables are suddenly at the village gates.