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A Rolling Stone article alleged a gang rape occurred at the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house at the University of Virginia. The magazine has since issued an apology for the article, saying the reporter's trust in her source was misplaced. (Associated Press)

Bogus stories abound in our pathetic press

Will Rogers, the late American humorist and cornpone philosopher, once said, “All I know is what I read in the papers.” That statement earned him a place in “Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations.” Were he alive today, it would most likely be inviting widespread derision. Today’s newspapers abound with bogus stories.

Illustration on Congress' continuing resolution provisions eroding Constitutional liberties by Alexandr Hunter/The Washington Times

President and Congress are heedless to the limits of their power

When the government is waving at us with its right hand, so to speak, it is the government’s left hand that we should be watching. Just as a magician draws your attention to what he wants you to see so you will not observe how his trick is performed, last week presented a textbook example of public disputes masking hidden deceptions. Here is what happened.

The Ghost of Flight 93 Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Thwarting U.S. defenses will lead only to more American victims

The attack on a cafe in Sydney, Australia, by a self-described Islamic cleric with a long police record, left two hostages dead, along with the cleric. That incident, which was televised worldwide, was quickly eclipsed by the massacre of 145 people at an army-run school in Peshawar, Pakistan. How is the West responding to these and other atrocities? More important, how is the Muslim world responding?

This is a copy of the cover of the CIA torture report released by Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein D-Calif., Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014. U.S. Senate investigators delivered a damning indictment of CIA interrogations Tuesday, accusing the spy agency of inflicting suffering on prisoners beyond its legal limits and peddling unsubstantiated stories that the harsh questioning saved American lives.  (AP Photo)

The truth about the CIA, torture, and congressional ingratitude

The truth – that enhanced interrogations saved lives, frightened other terrorists to not act, uncovered plots, and showed any al Qaeda wannabees that joining in would have serious personal consequences – is completely missing from the Senate Democrats’ report.

Blind Partisanship Donkey Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Democrats’ wasteful torture report

The recent release of a Senate report commissioned by Democrats regarding torture of terrorism suspects in order to obtain vital information was, in my opinion, a waste of $40 million of taxpayer money.

FILE - In this Nov. 13, 2014 file photo, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, after Senate Democrats voted on leadership positions for the 114th Congress.  Two years after first being elected to the Senate, Warren had a notable sophomore year, winning a leadership role and making her first official overseas trip, even as her party lost control of the Senate. From left are, Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev., Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont., Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., Warren, Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., and Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

The Democratic divide

The liberal news media have been gleefully reporting the GOP’s political quarrels for many years. That exaggerated storyline all but vanished last week, though, in the aftermath of the Democrats’ humiliating defeats in the midterm elections.

"Bumpering" Hillary 2016 Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Pining for Elizabeth Warren

Barack Obama is so yesterday. The elitists who supported him as the great “progressive” hope are abandoning him in droves as his popularity plummets. The Washington Post describes him as having the “worst” year of anyone in Washington, and as Republicans prepare to take over the Senate, he looks more and more like a lame duck incapable of delivering much more of anything to his base.

Illustration on the need for enhanced interrogation for national security by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

America needs its rough men

In spring 2009, I was invited to debate “torture” with Jon Stewart on “The Daily Show.” He gave me an opportunity to make a case with which he vehemently disagreed. He didn’t spout prepackaged sound bites — he presented thoughtful counterarguments. Not many television talk show hosts are willing — or able — to do that.

Karl Rove, a personable fellow who was deputy chief of staff in George W. Bush's White House and is sometimes credited with being the genius of George W.'s success, turns out to be a big fan of "rectal feeding," as used by the CIA to persuade terror suspects to spill their secrets.  (Associated Press/File)

Be careful who takes you to lunch

- The Washington Times

Lunch can sometimes be a big deal in Washington. Lunch is where alliances are struck, deals are made, and sometimes where foes become more or less friends over a shrimp cocktail or a chicken salad at the Palm. But if Karl Rove invites you to lunch, be sure you get to pick the restaurant.

Illustration on Saudi Arabia's strategic use of its oil supply by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Saudis allow falling oil prices to squeeze archrival Iran

Conventional wisdom in Western capitals holds that Saudi Arabia has held firm in sessions with its OPEC partners against lowering production — which would restore higher prices — in order to maintain its market share in countries belonging to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development and to dissuade investors from pouring more money into growing North American shale and tar sands production.

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The unappreciated first lady

Very little seems to have been written about Louisa Catherine Adams, wife of President John Quincy Adams and the sixth first lady of the United States. That is a pity because she seems to be as unappreciated in death as she was in her turbulent and trying life.

National Guard trucks haul residents through floodwaters to the Superdome after Hurricane Katrina hit  in New Orleans, Tuesday, Aug. 30,  2005. Officials called for a mandatory evacuation of the city, but many residents remained in the city. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

FEMA flunks out

In the days and weeks after Hurricane Katrina blew a path of destruction through New Orleans in 2005, Americans took notice of the bungling of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and its dysfunctional performance. Many began to question why the agency exists.

Harry Reid Internet Sales Tax Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Sapping small business with an Internet sales tax

As millions of Americans shop online this Cyber Monday, Sen. Harry Reid is plotting to pass Internet sales tax legislation soon that would increase online shoppers' tax burden and land a decisive blow against thousands of mom and pop online retailers.

Skilled computer hackers love Cyber Monday, and sneaky business spikes on this day. (Denver Post via Associated Press)

Mischief in cyberspace

With the arrival of Cyber Monday, a substantial part of holiday Internet sales — and the hopes of legions of retailers — ride on the seamless function of the complex network crucial for online commerce.

EPA Imposing Expensive Green Energy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

EPA's goofy green-energy rules

If you think President Obama's unilateral exercise of executive powers granting near-blanket amnesty to illegal immigrants was an abuse of power, get a load of what this administration is doing over at the Environmental Protection Agency.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Abbas, PA threaten Temple Mount

"Palestinian claims that Israel wants to change the status quo" at the Temple Mount in Jerusalem are a sham ("Israeli forces disperse West Bank demonstration," Web, Nov. 21). The Temple Mount has been the Jewish people's most sacred religious, historical and archaeological site for three millennia — since the 10th century B.C.

America's top-10 turkey leftovers - and where to get the recipes

- The Washington Times

Well, someone has to figure out what the heck Americans like to do with turkey in a post-Thanksgiving world. That job goes to the all-knowing National Turkey Federation, which charts both bird and industry with precision. Naturally, a reprise of the actual turkey dinner itself is the most popular, what with the siren call of hot turkey sandwiches bolstered with stuffing and gravy. That is, of course, unless Junior and Uncle Ralph didn't get to the turkey first.

**FILE** The United Nations headquarters building is seen July 27, 2007, in New York. (Associated Press)

Timor stands up, international elites say sit down

Timor told the international community it was ready to make its own way and that all UN/international types should leave. The elites hate such self-sufficiency.

Sen. Jim Webb Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Jim Webb, a maverick with a message

It's going to be easy — and fun for some — to dismiss the presidential candidacy of former Virginia Sen. Jim Webb, if he actually decides to run.

President Obama (Associated Press)

A dog whistle by the master

- The Washington Times

Barack Obama has the master wordsmith's gift for bending language, saying something that sounds good, but heard as something not so good.

"The Skeleton Road" by Val McDermid. Book jacket courtesy Grove Atlantic.

Who’s the corpse in the Edinburgh pinnacle?

Atragedy embedded in a love story is vividly relived in the setting of the brutal Balkan wars in this gripping and expertly plotted thriller.

An attitude of gratitude

Is there anything in the world that can stop the United States of America? We were born struggling against the British Empire — the most powerful entity at the time — and we totally wiped the floor with those crumpet-gobblers.

Congress Controls Purse Strings to Neutralize Executive Orders Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The coming Washington war

If you thought the bare-knuckled, no-holds-barred, midterm elections were rough, the last two years of Barack Obama's presidency will make that look like a Sunday school picnic.

Illustration on a coalition government for Libya by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Opening the door to a peaceful Libya

We all remember how in February 2011 the Arab Spring reached Libya, and Libyans came together to overthrow a 42-year-old dictatorship that crushed any semblance of democracy, freedom and free will.

Renting government workers

Union membership has fallen, but the impact of public-sector unions on federal politics still seems as strong as ever. How could this be? It sounds like a mystery, but it isn't.