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Filtering WiFi at Coffee Shops Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Internet pornography pandemic

In her recent interview with Vanity Fair, actress Jennifer Lawrence addresses her emotions following the widely publicized hack of her and several other actresses’ iCloud accounts, in which privately taken nude photographs were posted on the Internet, saying, “It’s not a scandal; it is a sex crime.”

Illustration on Democrat race baiting by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Race-baiting down the homestretch

Desperate times call for desperate measures, and with the possibility of Republicans gaining control of the Senate in the upcoming midterm elections, the left is resorting to jaw-droppingly despicable race-baiting tactics.

Connecting the Dots to Despotism Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Connecting the dots to despotism

Recently, I wrote a column suggesting that we are living in an age of insanity. Events since show the madness morphing into soft despotism, which may harden into outright tyranny.

Image: White House

Obama choreographed hug with Ebola victim

- The Washington Times

President Obama is usually “not interested in photo ops,” but apparently he made an exception for Friday’s good news that Nina Pham, the first Dallas nurse who contracted Ebola, is now virus-free.

Lonely Ebola Plane Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The cooty factor in the time of Ebola

At the end of the classic novel “Love in the Time of Cholera,” a ship remains at sea, with its star-crossed lovers keeping their secret as long as they don’t reach port.

In this Nov. 20, 2013, file photo, President Barack Obama awards former Washington Post executive editor Ben Bradlee with the Presidential Medal of Freedom during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House in Washington. Bradlee died Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014, according to The Washington Post. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci, File)

Ben Bradlee and the end of a rowdy era

- The Washington Times

The obituaries for Ben Bradlee, who died this week age 93, invariably described him as “the legendary editor” of The Washington Post. That was careless language. Ben was not “legendary” at all. He was very real, as the Watergate defendants learned to their chagrin and sorrow.

Illustration on overgrown government by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Larger government means shrinking efficiency

According to Gallup, a mere 28 percent of the nation has a “great deal” or “fair amount” of trust in the legislative branch, while the executive fares only marginally better.

RG ENTERTAINMENT LTD.
Animated versions of President Obama and Ronald Reagan argue economic philosophy in "I Want Your Money."

Obama demonstrates Reagan’s point

President Obama is nearing the end of his sixth year in office, with his unpopular liberal agenda in ruins, his job approval polls at record lows, and his party facing sweeping losses in next month’s elections.

China-Taiwan Submarine Power Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Submarines, made in Taiwan

To meet its long-standing requirements for modern submarines to deter attack from China, Taiwan has decided to start an indigenous development and construction program, which the United States can and should support.

Douglas MacArthur      Associated Press photo

Things fall apart

What ever became of that America? What ever became of that can-do nation? What has happened to us?

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Obama Drone Extremism Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Fighting extremism with extremism

In his speech last month to the United Nations, President Obama summoned foreign leaders to join his "campaign against extremism."

George Will (Associated Press) **FILE**

EDITORIAL: The academic mob silences free speech, again

Scripps College, an all-female school in Claremont, Calif., founded on the principle that "the paramount obligation of a college is to develop in its students the ability to think clearly and independently," last week revoked an invitation to conservative newspaper columnist George Will to speak to students because its administrators were offended by his rigorous math.

** FILE ** This mouse was produced from stem cells coaxed from skin tissue of adult mice and then reprogrammed. Two teams of Chinese scientists have made a major advance in the development of a new kind of stem cell that doesn't involve destroying embryos. (AP Photo/Nature, Dr. Qi Zhou)

EDITORIAL: Good news for rats and federal bureaucrats

Well-meaning Americans who want greater federal involvement in their lives are sure the government will do what's best to protect the public. It's about trust. But a decision by the Federal Labor Relations Authority illustrates how the first mission of the government is to protect the government.

A Wall Street address is carved in the side of a building, Wednesday, Oct. 8, 2014 in New York. Global stocks sank Friday Oct. 10, 2014 after Wall Street suffered its worst day of the year and weak German trade data fueled worry Europe is sliding into recession. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

How about a little optimism?

- The Washington Times

Stocks are way overdue for a correction, but there's no recession in sight.

Megaphone FEC Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The FEC complies with the Constitution, finally

Nearly five years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that citizens do not surrender their First Amendment rights merely because they choose to incorporate their private associations.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Blood on the Water'

Almost 200 men, women and children die when a bomb explodes on the pleasure boat Princess Mary as it floats down the Thames on a summer evening in 19th-century London.