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Criticism of Azerbaijan by the United States Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Misrepresenting Azerbaijan

Over the last several years, the Republic of Azerbaijan, widely acknowledged and praised for its commitment and pursuit of religious tolerance, has become a target of harsh criticism by the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIF).

Behind the Eight Ball Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Blaming white racism for violence

Last week, reporter Alison Parker and photojournalist Adam Ward — both white — were murdered in cold blood on television by Vester Lee Flanigan, a black man.

Obama Legacy: Ex-patriots Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How expatriates are forging an Obama legacy

The State Department recently announced that a record number of Americans in 2014 gave up their citizenship and decided to live elsewhere. Last year’s figure of 3,415 was a 14 percent increase over the previous record, 2,999, in 2013.

Illustration on the National Zoo pandas by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

What the ‘Save the Pandas’ campaign reveals

For years, the National Zoo has come under fire, including in a blistering 2013 Congressional report over gross negligence, a scathing 2004 National Academy of Sciences report into animal deaths at the zoo and, somewhere in between, an investigation revealing that the zoo had disposed of some wild animals by sending them to a canned hunting outfit and to a petting zoo.

Laws Protecting Intellectual Property Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When comprehensive legislation is counterproductive

The announcement by the House Republican leadership that the Innovation Act (H.R. 9) will not be scheduled for a vote this summer has the bill’s supporters concerned but not yet alarmed.

Illustration on the one percent and the American dream by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The American Dream lives

The American Dream couldn’t be more alive but there are those promoting class warfare who are certainly trying to kill it off. A recent Gallup poll (May 2015) shows that 63 percent of those polled feel that wealth and money should be more evenly distributed in America.

Caitlyn Jenner on the cover of Vanity Fair    Associated Press photo

New pronouns for the traveling freak show

- The Washington Times

Caitlyn Jenner, taking pride in his or her decolletage with a smart new frock for his famous Vanity Fair photo shoot, started the madness of the summer of ‘15, but he’s got nothing on the educationist establishment. They’re nothing but boobs (and proud of it).

Mount McKinley Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

McKinley, a mountain moniker no more

William McKinley doesn’t get the respect he deserves. The nation’s 25th president presided over a powerful pivot point in American history.

Pulling the Plug on the EPA Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

EPA’s clean power fraud

The Environmental Protection Agency has twisted 280 words in the Clean Air Act into 2,690 pages of Clean Power Plan regulations and appendices.

Related Articles

Illustration on U.S. oil exports by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

An antiquated oil export ban

As part of the new nuclear agreement, the Iranian energy industry will be allowed to export its oil.

The Animas River flows with toxic waste from the Gold King Mine on Aug. 8, 2015, as seen from the 32nd Street Bridge in Durango, Colo., as the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad train goes by. (Associated Press) **FILE**

EPA's toxic adventure

Imagine an agency charged with protecting the environment, aptly named the Environmental Protection Agency. Because, you see, we need to protect the environment, and we need a government cudgel with which to do it.

Christians must vote

It has been estimated that less than 20 percent of self-identifying Christians vote. I believe this is the reason self-serving politicians govern our country.

Japan had further plans for U.S.

As World War II began, the United States knew Japanese intellectuals included accomplished physicists such as Yoshio Nishina. They knew he was a staunch Imperial nationalist and capable leader; so capable two of his students later won Nobel prizes.

A worker wipes a representation of the The Great Seal of the United States at the newly opened U.S. Embassy in Havana, Cuba. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

America returns to Cuba

Gulags and satrapies are required in the nether world where Marxist fantasy survives. How else to keep the peasants in line? Secretary of State John Kerry, looking for love in all the wrong places, took a handful of congressmen to Havana the other day to preside over the raising of the American flag at the reopening of the American embassy, closed in 1961 when Fidel Castro imposed the Marxist yoke upon the neck of the Cuban people. The three Marines who lowered the flag 53 years ago, old men now, were called back to run up Old Glory once more. Mr. Kerry celebrated the occasion as another achievement of Barack Obama's presidency.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe delivers a statement to mark the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II during a press conference at his official residence in Tokyo Friday, Aug. 14, 2015. Abe has expressed "profound grief" for all who perished in World War II in a statement marking the 70th anniversary of the country's surrender. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

Lessons from an apology

Apologies are never easy, and apologizing in the name of a nation is hardest of all. Barack Obama still suffers, and no doubt always will, the approbation of many of his countrymen for his apology in Egypt early in his presidency, for what is still not clear, to the Islamic countries of the Middle East. A succession of Japanese prime ministers have put their hand to apologies for World War II. So how would Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's formal speech on the 70th anniversary of the end of The Great Pacific War, as many Asians call World War II, differ from the others?

Chart to accompany Moore article of Aug. 17, 2015

Why Hillary's college tuition plan won't work

In the days ahead millions of kids will pack their bags and leave home (hopefully for good) to go to college. For parents experiencing this for the first time: welcome to the biggest financial scam in America.

A voter can be seen in a voting booth Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014 in Honolulu.  Despite the rains and winds from Tropical Storm Iselle that pounded the state Friday, Hawaii will hold primary elections today.  (AP Photo/Marco Garcia)

Another attack on election reforms

Although people in the nation's smallest state can obtain photo voter IDs with ease, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) says that requiring an ID in order to vote is a hardship.

Problem Solved Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Filling a Republican cabinet in 2017

Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry deserves a lot of credit for pointing to an enormous opportunity for Republicans.

Remembering the last American to die in World War II

Given that Japan started the Pacific War with a cowardly sneak attack on Pearl Harbor, it comes as small surprise that the last American to die in the war was killed by military extremists after both sides had agreed to end hostilities.

Illustration on the loss of U.S. military options after the Obama/Iran nuclear arms deal takes effect by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How Obama gets it wrong

Defending the Iran nuclear deal he negotiated in Vienna, Secretary of State John Kerry has repeatedly asserted something that has been much ignored in the discussion surrounding it -- that all options which the United States possesses today to stop Iran going nuclear will be there for a future U.S. president in 10 years.

Ferguson police Humvees needed year after violence

The Pentagon's recent demand is the height of political correctness run amok, and it will cost more lives ("Pentagon orders Ferguson to return Humvees," Web, Aug. 12). In August of last year, after the fatal shooting of Michael Brown, police confronted protesters with snipers atop armored vehicles because they had intelligence there was going to be violence. That show of force prevented the violence. The media and political left became livid, however, saying the officers were overreacting. So the officers backed down. The next day the looters went wild, just as the intelligence had predicted. In the recent riots in Baltimore the police were held back by the mayor because she did not want to upset the protesters and escalate matters. This let the looters run wild for an entire night.