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President Trump (Associated Press)

No hot date for the Nerd Prom

- The Washington Times

Guess who’s not coming to dinner, and probably a good thing, too. Neither Donald Trump nor the not so loyal opposition can be trusted to sup together without sharp elbows, sneers and insults. Before the second bottle of wine is uncorked, the hard rolls (and most years the rolls are really hard) would be flying across the tables.

Illustration on President Trump's "disruptive" approach to governance by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

Rebooting the new Trump presidency

President Trump is off to the rockiest start of any modern president. He faces remarkably well-organized opposition from liberal activists, who refuse to accept the outcome of the election, but his biggest problems are bad management, staffing and questionable strategic decisions at the White House.

Illustration on funding the border wall with seized illegal cash by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ready billions for the wall

Sometimes the obvious just needs to be said. Official Washington is bellyaching about the cost of President Trump’s “wall,” intended to protect the Southwest border. Some put the cost at more than $20 billion. So be it. Beyond contraband and illegal immigrants coming north, something goes south: cash. Simply put, these illicit proceeds, counted in the tens of billions, would easily pay for the wall — time to say so.

Illustration of Qassem Suleymani by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Crimes of Qassem

He might not be a household name in America — at least, not yet. But throughout the Middle East, Qassem Suleymani makes the righteous and the innocent tremble.

A New Jersey State Police cruiser leaves Trump National Golf Club, Friday, Nov. 18, 2016, in Bedminster, N.J. President-elect Donald Trump is expected to arrive at the golf club on Friday. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

Criminal civil forfeiture

Living in a free society brings benefits, but also responsibilities. One of the most important is keeping an eye on government. You never know when lawmakers will try to do something bad — or something that seems good initially, then goes spectacularly wrong.

Illustration on Taiwan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

China, Taiwan and an important anniversary

This year Beijing will stand in solidarity with Taiwan and commemorate the 70th anniversary of the “228 Massacre.” On Feb. 28, 1947 Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek’s Kuomintang (KMT) security forces stopped Lin Jiang-mai, a Taiwanese widow, for illegal cigarette sales. The KMT officers confiscated Mrs. Lin’s cash and wares. They struck her on the head repeatedly for resisting.

Healthcare Industry Dependence on Obamacare Finances Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When hospitals resist change

Most Republican health care proposals include Health Savings Accounts (HSAs). People like them because they reward healthy lifestyle choices and careful, cost-conscious use of health care resources. When we are advised we need to get a MRI, we ask “when?” and “where?” but hardly ever, “what does it cost?”

Chart to acompany Moore article of Feb. 27, 2017

Pleading poverty, demanding new taxes

Stop me if you’ve heard this story before. Governors and state legislators are pleading poverty again and they are demanding tax hikes of every imaginable kind. More than half the states are facing big deficits this year and they are mostly blue states like California, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois and New York and Oregon. (See chart.) These are the highest tax states with some of the deepest pools of red ink. There’s got to be a message here.

Illustration on trump's international policy attitude by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Trump Doctrine

The United States needs a grand strategy to guide its foreign policy. The Trump Doctrine should announce boldly that America is back in the world leadership business and that it stands resolutely for peace. America should call out countries that threaten world peace and form military alliances with their neighbors to confront them.

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting on domestic and international human trafficking, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. With Trump are Michelle DeLaune, center, National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, and Dina Powell, right, White House Senior Counselor for Economic Initiatives. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Trumpspeak, a language rich in adjectives

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump isn’t the carrier of the disease that threatens the language, but he suffers with enthusiasm. His abuse of the adjective might eventually threaten his foreign policy.

Illustration on immigration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘I am an immigrant’

I have a Masters in International Relations, speak four languages and served as a politician in my country, the Republic of Georgia. I am also an immigrant.

Playing the xenophobic card

- The Washington Times

Last week, The New York Times detailed President Donald Trump’s press conference, and wrote: “A Jewish reporter got to ask Trump a question, it didn’t go well.”

The Genesis of Despicable Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Being a ‘deplorable’

Who among us can’t at some point relate to what it feels like to be an “irredeemable deplorable,” a term coined in the heat of a campaign but with far greater implications now. Whether we are religious or not, whether we pray or not, whether we are political activists or not, many of us know what it feels like to be mocked to the point of less than “other” status.

Related Articles

Illustration on the results of Congressional overcomplexity on tax reform by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Changing the tax code

When it comes to changing our tax code, Washington should trust the free-enterprise system. The problem is too many politicians writing tax policy have never worked in the real world.

Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch speaks in the East Room of the White House in Washington, in this Jan. 31, 2017, file photo. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

The painful education of Neil Gorsuch

- The Washington Times

Neil Gorsuch doesn't know much about politics and how the political class in Washington works, and that's a good thing. Politics and the law make unnatural bedfellows, and the progeny of such beds is often unnatural.

Tragedy of American Drugs Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

What the national drug crisis requires

Extraordinary times we live in -- not least because supposedly responsible people are promoting drug abuse, which everyone knows cascades into addiction, drug-crime, overdoses -- that are killing us. So what gives? No one wants to stand up and take responsibility for saying -- stop this madness, and fix the crisis. America's greatness depends on a lot of things -- and stopping the rolling, expansive, destructive drug crisis is one.

A 1950s cattle ranch and roiling politics

April Smith's "Home Sweet Home" is based on a true story of an East Coast family that moved to the West to become cattle ranchers in the 1950s.

Illustration on Trump's tweeting by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

Donald Trump's tweets

President Trump faces a lot of trouble at home and abroad, but you would never know it from the complaints he regularly fires off in his combative, news-making tweets and other remarks.

Yes to Medicaid block grants

The disability community is apoplectic about Health and Human Services Secretary-designate Rep. Tom Price's commitment to Medicaid block grants. Yet block granting was somewhat successful under President Reagan, and President Trump can improve it.

FILE - In this Nov. 19, 2016 file photo, then-President-elect Donald Trump walks Labor Secretary-designate Andrew Puzder from Trump National Golf Club Bedminster clubhouse in Bedminster, N.J. Puzder has proposed avoiding conflicts of interest by resigning as CEO of his fast food empire, selling off hundreds of holdings and recusing himself from government decisions in which he has a financial interest, according to his ethics filings with the government. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Plugging the terror gaps

President Trump hit the courthouse wall trying to prevent immigrants from seven terror-exporting nations from entering the United States until they can be properly vetted. This enables radical Islamic saboteurs to sneak past inefficient U.S. screening procedures like wolves among innocent sheep. Until the president's new vetting plans are in place, Congress must seek alternative measures to expel bad actors once discovered. Republican congressmen, fortunately, are working on it.

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos smiles while greeting employees after addressing the department staff at the Department of Education on Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017 in Washington. (AP Photo/Molly Riley)

Betsy DeVos laughs last

Betsy DeVos was what bomber pilots call "a target of opportunity," selected not from a carefully compiled list of strategic targets, but a target that a pilot with a few bombs left over from the day's work is free to drop if he sees something inviting. Chuck Schumer, comfortable in his safe place, knew he had to blow up somebody. His friends on the left were thirsty for scalps and blood.

Illustration on prescription drug advertising by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Just say no to drug ads on TV

It's been 20 years since the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) permitted the advertising of prescription drugs on television. It was a dumb decision in 1997, and it's dumber after two decades, with just one other nation, New Zealand, in agreement.

FILE- In this Feb. 1, 2017 file photo, ACLU of Oregon legal director Mat dos Santos speaks at a news conference in Portland to announce a federal lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Portland against President Donald Trump's executive immigration order. President Trump's immigration order has had a positive effect of the ACLU's bottom line. Tens of millions of dollars are pouring into the ACLU and hundreds of thousands of people are signing on as members so quickly that the group's 1,150 employees can't keep track. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)

Skewing the polls on immigration

A new year, a new Congress, and a new presidential administration but the same perennial debate about illegal immigration. And with it comes countless polls that suggest solutions to the problem.

President Donald Trump speaks in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017. The Associated Press has learned that another nonprofit organization is rejecting federal grant money to fight against violent extremism under President Donald Trump's administration. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Major media remain in denial

Since Donald Trump's election, the major media have been trying to figure out what they did wrong, given their fawning coverage of Hillary Clinton and their anti-Trump stories. Didn't they help twice elect Barack Obama? Why didn't the formula work this time?

Ushering In the End of Obamacare Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Ubering past Obamacare

In 2009, when President Obama first took on health care reform, three major issues in the existing system were almost universally agreed upon:

When a nation's secrets were not protected

Nonfiction writers on two continents have dined out for decades with books on the gaggle of British officials who served Stalin, collectively known as the "Cambridge Spy Ring." The names of Kim Philby, Guy Burgess and Donald Maclean live in history with well-earned infamy, and the story of how they stole secret information of enormous value to the USSR is a familiar one.

Americans are optimistic since President Trump took over at the White House, with businesses overwhelmingly expecting improvements. (Associated Press)

The president and the courts

Last week, in a public courtroom in the federal courthouse in Seattle, the states of Washington and Minnesota -- after suing President Trump, alleging injury caused by his executive order that suspended the immigration of all people from seven foreign countries -- asked a federal judge to compel the president and all those who work for him to cease enforcing the order immediately.

Russian Control of Ukraine Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Russia's gradual swallowing of Ukraine

In recent days, Russia has resumed deadly attacks in its de facto war with Ukraine. Perhaps this is an early test of President Trump by Russian President Vladimir Putin. Perhaps Mr. Putin wagers that a newly nationalistic U.S. administration will have little appetite for foreign conflicts. Either way, one thing is clear: Ukraine is merely the Kremlin's first step toward reassembling the Soviet Union.

Lady Gaga performing at the halftime show for Superbowl 51     Associated Press photo

Halftime at the Super Bowl

Halftime at the Super Bowl, once merely a forgettable 30 minutes to get another beer or join the line at the restroom, is more entertaining now. Halftime at the Super Bowl sometimes gets different reviews from different generations. But this year everyone could find something to be dazzled by in Lady Gaga's terrific patriotic pop.