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Stanton Evans Portrait Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A tribute to Stan Evans

At last year’s CPAC Reagan banquet, Stan Evans regaled attendees with tales of the early days of the American Conservative Union. His remarks — oh so accurate, oh so funny, and preserved for posterity on YouTube — conveyed important history lessons.

Freedom yes, redefining marriage no

By an almost 2-1 margin, Americans in a recent poll declared they agree that “States and citizens should remain free to uphold marriage as the union of a man and a woman and the Supreme Court shouldn’t force all 50 states to redefine marriage.”

Muzzling the Government Watchdog Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Losing both bark and bite over Hillary’s emails

Outrage over the revelation of Hillary Clinton’s exclusive use of her personal email during her time at the State Department has brought broad-based criticism from the entire political spectrum. (In fact, it was the lefty New York Times that broke the story.)

President Barack Obama introduces first lady Michelle Obama in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, March 3, 2015, as they announce their ‘Let Girls Learn’ initiative. The Obama administration is expanding efforts and directing a variety of federal agencies to work with other countries to help young girls worldwide attend and stay in school. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

A crippled presidency

If someone were writing a book about America at this point in time, it should be titled “The Decline and Fall of Barack Obama’s Presidency.”

Soldiers listen to U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter at Kandahar Airfield in Afghanistan, Sunday, Feb. 22, 2015. Carter is making his first trip to visit troops and commanders in Afghanistan since his swearing-in this week. (AP Photo/Jonathan Ernst, Pool)

Vanquishing the enemy

As the Islamic State and other militant Islamist groups are attracting young men and women into its ranks, will we honor the primary duty of the federal government?

In this March 3, 2015, photo, President Barack Obama speaks about Iran and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's speech to Congress during a meeting with Defense Secretary Ashton Carter in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

The audacity of weakness

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu spoke to Congress on Tuesday to warn Americans of the anti-Western threats from theocratic — and likely to soon be nuclear — Iran.

The Court and the Burwell Obamacare Case Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A prescription for health care after Burwell

On Wednesday, the nine justices of the United States Supreme Court will consider the case of King v. Burwell, concerning the constitutionality of Obamacare, determining the limits of President Obama’s executive power and the ability of the president to rewrite laws on his own while ignoring the constitutional duties of the legislative branch of government.

Related Articles

Evolution's lingering questions

Several years ago in an Internet commentary many people were complaining about God being mentioned as our Creator in a Texas textbook. Based on their belief that we all evolved, I wrote and asked which evolved first — male or female? I was called a Neanderthal and a member of the flat earth society who didn't believe planes could fly and other names.

How the Spanish Civil War shaped history

Richard Rhodes has a way of taking on big topics and famous incidents and locales from Hiroshima to Hollywood and writing about them in prose that is both accessible and memorable.

Infrastructure in Need of Repair Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Rebuilding the American powerhouse

Our infrastructure is collapsing, and Americans know it. They see it every day in the potholes they drive over, the bridges in their communities that have been shut down and the water pipes that burst.

Businesses are fleeing California's high taxes and strict regulations. (AP Photo/Lansing State Journal, Rod Sanford)

Fleeing California

More than a century ago, Roy Farmer, 20, went door-to-door in Los Angeles with his bags of home-roasted coffee beans. By the 1930s, Farmer Brothers was selling coffee to restaurants throughout the nation. Today the company employs 1,200 men and women and generates $200 million in annual sales to restaurants, convenience stores, hospitals, hotels and universities.

The  Maryland State House dome standing above buildings in Annapolis.  (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Protecting aging senators

Anything goes, we suppose, in politics as in love and war. Life expectancy in the United States now stands at 78.8 years, and Maryland Democrats, stung by losing the governorship last November, are trying to change the rules of Senate succession to protect their aging senators.

Obama's Mindless Spending Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s liberal spending panacea

President Obama recently denounced the "mindless austerity" that threatens his dream of spending $4 trillion in the coming year. In lieu of the current sequestration restrictions on federal spending, Mr. Obama promises "smart investments that strengthen America." But "smart investments" are a pipe dream as long as the president and his team view federal spending as magic beans to miraculously make America rich.

Nerobama Illustration by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Barack Obama, America's Nero

President Theodore Roosevelt said, "Speak softly, and carry a big stick." More than a century later, President Obama speaks loudly (and incessantly) and carries a twig.

U.S. Government Waste Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The world’s greatest financial fraudster

The London Times headlined last week, "HSBC helped customers to hide millions from taxman." There are decades of stories about corporations, movie actors, artists and politicians hiding money from the taxman. Many economic studies have shown that once tax rates exceed 20 percent, most people will start thinking about and then acting in legal or illegal ways to avoid the tax bill.

Smoke billows from the coal-fired Merrimack Station in Bow, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole, File)

Mischief with factoids

Facts are facts, as any reputable scientist would tell you, and if someone tries to change them, like changing a pair of soiled pants, they risk embarrassing exposure. The global warming hysteria is premised on "facts" showing the earth is warming, but these "facts" have been repeatedly exposed as "factoids," the playful invented word of novelist Norman Mailer, to describe something that is presented as fact, sounds like it could be a fact, but is actually not a fact. Surely imposing global restrictions on human activity, which would deny prosperity to the poorest among us, must be premised on something better than factoids.

Theodore Roosevelt

As anti-Semitism makes a comeback, Obama remains ignorant

- The Washington Times

We're well into the new century, moving swiftly through the second decade of the new millennium, at ease in an era of science, modern medicine and wondrous electronics that our grandparents could not have imagined. (Even our parents don't understand most of it.)

Hezbollah Missiles Supplied by Iran Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hezbollah’s threat to terrorize the world

''Our goal is to liberate the 1948 borders of Palestine [Jews] can go back to Germany, or wherever they came from." That not-so-subtle threat came from a Hezbollah spokesman a dozen years ago. Increasingly, it's looking like more than bravado.

No atheist outcry over Islamic terror

A student at Yulee High School in Florida was recently disciplined for signing off the approved morning announcement by saying "God bless America" ("Florida student sparks fireworks with 'God bless America' intercom sign-off," Web, Feb. 12). Two atheists at the school were angered at that utterance.

Ivanpah solar energy project (Sandia National Laboratories' website)

No rival for the lightning bug

Everybody likes the sun. The rays feel good and they're free for everyone. Nobody likes the sun more than the promoters of solar electricity. These so-called "green energy companies," however, are anything but free, and have collected, on average, $39 billion a year in federal subsidies in the six years and counting of the Obama administration. They haven't produced enough electricity to match the glow of a lightning bug's bottom.

File - This undated file photo shows the statues of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Teddy Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln at Mount Rushmore in South Dakota. Gov. Dennis Daugaard will talk about how South Dakota tourism, a huge industry for the state, performed in 2014 on Thursday, Jan. 22, 2015. He'll also unveil the state's new campaign to attract visitors to South Dakota. (AP Photo/File)

Americans say leave Mount Rushmore 'as is' - but 21% of Dems would add Obama

- The Washington Times

Leave Mount Rushmore as is, say most Americans. They are content with the monumental likenesses of George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Thomas Jefferson and Theodore Roosevelt - carved on a mountain in South Dakota. But 21 percent of Democrats - one in five- would like to see President Obama join those presidents some day. Meanwhile, 16 percent of Republicans say Ronald Reagan should be the next portrait to be added. So says a new poll from Rasmussen Reports released Monday.