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The Annual Academy Liberal Awards Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How not to embarrass Oscar

When you give your acceptance speeches, thank your publicist, limo driver, manicurist, masseuse, day nanny, night nanny and weekend nanny. Your attorney Marty Singer for killing that salacious National Enquirer story.

Illustration on the need to clean house at U.S. intelligence agencies by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Rousting the anti-Flynn cabal

In the anti-Trump media war, it is nearly impossible to keep the names straight without a scorecard. Barely had Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn’s name faded from the news cycle than he was replaced by H.R. McMaster, another lieutenant general most Americans have never heard of. Will this latest general be any more fortunate than his predecessor? Only if he can overcome the frenzied machinations of the Obama deep state.

President Donald Trump, right, speaks as Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, left, listens at Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Fla., Monday, Feb. 20, 2017, where Trump announced that McMaster will be the new national security adviser. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

The downside of a Trump tariff

When word got out in January 1848 that gold had been discovered at Sutter’s Mill in Coloma, California, near Sacramento, it triggered the famous California Gold Rush, which in a few short years brought some 300,000 fortune seekers to the territory, whose population at the time was just 155,000, most of them Native Americans.

Attack on the Earth by the Evil Empire Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Time’s misreading of science

As demonstrated by the confirmation hearings of Scott Pruitt for new Environmental Protection Agency chief, all-out war is being waged against the Trump administration by leftists who believe science is under attack from the evil empire.

President Donald Trump walks with Housing and Urban Development Secretary-designate Dr. Ben Carson, as they pass a exhibit honoring Carson during a tour of the National Museum of African American History and Culture, Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The Trump-Reagan parallels

The media laugh at any attempt to compare President Trump with former President Ronald Reagan, but there are many similarities, not the least of which are the withering attacks both men endured while running for and as president.

Milo Yiannopoulos      Associated Press photo

An expensive lesson for conservatives

- The Washington Times

The more the culture bounds out of control, the more the wary have to take care with the company they keep. This applies to media that will print anything in pursuit of “clicks” and “hits,” and to well-meaning organizations about whom they invite to tutor their true believers.

No deal for a two-state solution

“The president is committed to peace. That’s as far as I want to go on that,” said President Trump’s press secretary, Sean Spicer, on Feb. 3 in answer to a reporter’s inquiry regarding the Trump administration’s position on the “two-state solution” for peace between the Palestinians and Israelis. Will Mr. Trump push the two-state paradigm, like George W. Bush and Barack Obama before him, or will the White House realize that this idea is a dangerous fantasy like the irrational Iran nuclear deal?

Retirement Planning Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Investing for the long term

Ordinary investors can’t be blamed for hesitancy about stocks with market indexes trading near record levels and President Trump’s radical, sometimes quixotic ideas creating so much uncertainty. Yet patience and a diversified portfolio remain the best long-term investment strategy.

FILE - This 2015 file photo provided by the Bloomington Normal Airport Authority shows a damaged wing of a Cirrus SR22 single-engine plane at the Central Illinois Regional Airport in Bloomington, Ill. Once seen as a luxury of the corporate world, private planes are becoming increasingly common at U.S. colleges and universities as schools try to attract athletes, raise money and reward coaches with jet-set vacations. Iowa State University President Steven Leath, a pilot, acknowledged last year that he used a school plane for trips that mixed personal and university business, a practice that came to light after he damaged the aircraft in a hard landing. (Bloomington Normal Airport Authority via AP, File)

TripAdvisor’s Stockholm Syndrome

Despite producing huge amounts of value for society, businesses are among the most vilified institutions in America.

Illustration on the drawbacks of Obamacare risk pools by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How to lower Obamacare premiums

The Affordable Care Act is in a “death spiral,” warns Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini. Premiums have doubled since the end of 2013, and yet insurers are rapidly exiting the individual market, leaving consumers in many parts of the nation at risk of having no coverage.

Illustration on plans to defeat radical Islam by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Defeating radical Islam

Who is the enemy? It’s been over 15 years since Sept. 11, 2001, and this fundamental question still rattles around. Prominent answers have included evildoers, violent extremists, terrorists, Muslims, and Islamists.

Congressman Matt Cartwright speaks during a rally held at the Lackawanna County Courthouse in Scranton Pa., Sunday Feb. 19, 2017, to focus on protecting Affordable Care Act, Medicare and Medicaid. (Jason Farmer/The Times & Tribune via AP)

Congress must stop death by decree

At the first meeting of the Trump Leadership Council — an advisory group consisting of top CEOs from major companies — President Donald Trump asked these business leaders what was their biggest problem. I expected the answer to be America’s anti-growth tax system.

Increasing Cyber Vandalism Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The cyberhacking to come

If you thought the 2016 presidential election was an orgy of cyber hacking of Hillary Clinton’s private email server, of the Democratic Party computers being trawled through, and of fake news stories about Donald Trump’s hijinks in Russia, you are right. But you ain’t seen nothing yet.

Illustration on choice in health care by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

How the market can fix health care

Republicans agree that Obamacare has failed and must be repealed. But they can’t agree on the replacement “plan.”

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FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2016 file photo, then-Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump gestures as he talks with Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke, left, during a campaign stop at Milwaukee County War Memorial Center in Milwaukee. Clarke has risen to the national political spotlight with a brash, unapologetic personality reminiscent of President Donald Trump. But while some Republicans swoon over his prospects for higher office, the tough-talking, cowboy-hat wearing lawman remains one of the most polarizing figures in Wisconsin politics. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

Uncle Sap no longer lives here

President Trump's ordering of certain mild sanctions against Iran and its friends only stings. Nobody feels much actual pain. But it sends a message to Iran that its testing of ballistic missiles capable of carrying a nuclear weapon violates the spirit, if not the letter, of the agreement it signed with the United States and other nations of the West.

U.S. taking power back from left

Donald Trump assuming the presidency finds an unhinged political left still unable to cope with or accept the reality that President Obama's anti-American transformation is being erased by pro-American restoration.

When a vaunted life and fiction converge

The very term Dame of the British Empire -- the female equivalent of a knighthood in the British gentry -- inevitably summons up a majestic figure. But there was nothing genteel about the British novelist Dame Beryl Bainbridge DBE (1932-2010).

Illustration on exposing subversive elements in America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Restoring America's leadership and security

There is no question that on Nov. 8, 2016 we had a political revolution in America. Over 63 million Americans had had enough of President Obama's "fundamental transformation" of America. His embrace of the progressive socialist agenda with its Marxist roots, coupled with his attempt to force the spread of Islam on our Judeo-Christian culture, resulted in not only a failed domestic policy but also a disastrous foreign policy. His actions have left the Middle East in total chaos in addition to creating the greatest strategic instability throughout the world since WWII.

FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2016 file photo, then-Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump gestures as he talks with Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke, left, during a campaign stop at Milwaukee County War Memorial Center in Milwaukee. Clarke has risen to the national political spotlight with a brash, unapologetic personality reminiscent of President Donald Trump. But while some Republicans swoon over his prospects for higher office, the tough-talking, cowboy-hat wearing lawman remains one of the most polarizing figures in Wisconsin politics. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

A mad man, or maybe a magician

Donald Trump as a real estate dealmaker thrived on chaos -- creating and then exploiting it to achieve his goals. Now as president, Mr. Trump is upsetting allies and disrupting international security and economic arrangements to deliver on his campaign promises to make Americans safer and more prosperous.

Illustration on the need for voter ID laws by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why the North Carolina voter ID case matters

They may never admit it, but the civil rights industry is tired of spending millions of dollars only to lose most voter ID fights in court. Instead of declaring defeat, the strategy has shifted to changing the rules of engagement, and trying to transform the Voting Rights Act into something it isn't. The Supreme Court can now stop this transformation of the Voting Rights Act into a partisan political weapon, if it accepts an appeal from North Carolina.

Executive order necessary

As attested to by the FBI, the U.S. intelligence community is concerned that the Islamic State has the ability to manufacture fraudulent passports ("How Donald Trump strengthens national security," Web, Feb. 1).

A rainbow is shown from Bernal Heights Hill in San Francisco, Monday, Jan. 23, 2017. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

Indigestion at the table

San Francisco has long been on the cutting edge of fine cuisine, the gustatory equal of New York and New Orleans. The city sometimes calls itself "Baghdad by the Bay," a marketing stroke obviously coined by someone who had never been east of Suez, "where the best is like the worst." So when restaurant after restaurant started closing in recent months the foodie fashionistas in San Francisco swallowed hard and asked what happened.

Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., speaks at the Jefferson College of Health Sciences at the Carilion Clinic on Monday, Jan. 30, 2017, in Roanoke, Va. (Stephanie Klein-Davis/The Roanoke Times via AP)

When the party's over

The radical left, which now, alas, includes the Democratic Party, has gone off the rails. Worker bees at the Environmental Protection Agency and certain other federal agencies, encouraged by their superiors, are now using encrypted messages to coordinate undermining the policies of the new Trump administration. Sen. Tim Kaine of Virginia, the party's recent vice presidential nominee, seems to endorse "fighting" the new president "in the streets." The country has never seen such subversion by a major political party.

Family troubles and war-torn London

Those people were war dead and the memory as portrayed by Elizabeth Wilhide is that of Julia and her existence in the World War II blitz of London. The scenes of what Londoners suffered in 1944 are harrowing not only for their gruesome qualities but for their chilling emphasis on how much trivia came to matter.

Illustration on the application of law to Hillary Clinton by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton and the law

Hillary Clinton's email scandal and the Clinton Foundation scandal are back in the news, as they are likely to be for years to come. At his confirmation hearing, Attorney General-designate Jeff Sessions said he would recuse himself from all investigations involving the Clintons.

Illustration of Linda Sarsour by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Linda Sarsour, the left's latest star

What to make of Linda Sarsour of Brooklyn, lead plaintiff in the lawsuit against President Trump's immigration order and the new, seemingly ubiquitous symbol of the hard left-radical Islam alliance?

Rex Tillerson (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The coming test of Donald Trump

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump is about to get a tough test of his presidential leadership, with no true-or-false or multiple-choice questions. Every new president gets the test, usually administered by international creeps and bad guys. There's no fudging the answers. Reality is the teacher, grading on a steep curve, and presidents pass or fail. There's no soft grading.