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Liberties Lost Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The presumption of liberty

In the years following the adoption of the Constitution, before he was secretary of state under President Thomas Jefferson and then president himself, James Madison, who wrote the Constitution, was a member of the House of Representatives.

Illustration on reality and memory in Germany on the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Berlin Wall, back to the future

Americans groove on the exhilaration of argument and accusation as the midterm elections finally approach, but here in Germany, there’s the bitter remembrance of what it was like to have none of the above.

Illustration on the standards and limitations of the national Core Curriculum by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Assessing Common Core: Con

Common Core is bad for students, and it’s bad for teachers, parents and state and local autonomy. It is a federal intrusion and all-encompassing leviathan that legally should not be allowed to stand.

Gov. Bill Haslam speaks at an economic development announcement in Cookville, Tenn., on Monday, Aug. 25, 2014. The Republican governor shrugged off a letter from state Rep. Rick Womick who had called it "treasonous" for a political action committee run by Haslam supporters to target GOP lawmakers who opposed the adminstration on Common Core education standards. (AP Photo/Erik Schelzig)

Assessing Common Core: Pro

As states have begun to implement Common Core State Standards in earnest, controversy around the initiative has swelled.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev. speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 17, 2014, after a Democratic caucus meeting.  President Barack Obama will meet with Congressional leaders at the White House on Wednesday to discuss the turmoil in Iraq. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Voters know who to blame for their woes

Americans go to the polls on Nov. 4 to cast their votes in a midterm election that’s shaping up to be an angry outcry over the disastrous direction of the country.

Corrupt Foreign Policy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s phony foreign-aid reform

Four years ago, President Obama promised in a United Nations speech to “change the way we do business” with foreign aid and “seek partners who want to build their own capacity to provide for their people.” However, Mr. Obama, like numerous prior presidents, is more devoted to boosting aid spending than to fixing its flaws.

Related Articles

FILE - This undated file image made available by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) shows the Ebola virus. In a second, smaller Ebola outbreak, at least 69 people, including eight health workers, are believed to have been infected according to a study that was led by the World Health Organization and researchers from France and Canada and published online Wednesday, Oct. 15, 2014, by the New England Journal of Medicine. The outbreak that began in July in the Democratic Republic of Congo is similar to earlier ones in that central African region, genetic testing of viruses shows. (AP Photo/Centers for Disease Control, File)

CHARLES: Ebola, more vital facts untold

With countless unknowns surrounding the recent discovery, transmission, infection rates, and potentially exponential growth of Ebola in the United States in the months ahead, trust is vital.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Bush exonerated, media silent

I must be living in an episode of "The Twilight Zone." On Oct. 15 the New York Times — the outlet to which all other publications seem to look for their leftist directives — put forth a front-page bombshell: More than 5,000 chemical weapons were indeed found in Iraq. This is the 'worse than Watergate' story of the last decade, yet ABC, NBC, CBS and CNN aren't even mentioning it.

Illustration on the political abandonment of the failing Obama administration by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

ALLARD: Fleeing the Leaky Ship Obama

Call it a sign of the times. Like when Ben Affleck was so conflicted recently about the Islamist threat that he raised doubts about whether he had actually watched "Argo," the blockbuster he produced and starred in about how the CIA used trickery to rescue Americans from Tehran.

March for Life vs. Obamacare Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

MONAHAN: Obamacare, or abortion care?

For almost 41 years, my organization has hosted a rally and march on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Perhaps you have seen us — as the largest pro-life gathering in the world.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Infatuated with nothing

At a recent fundraiser for President Obama, actress Gwyneth Paltrow introduced the president by blurting out, "You're so handsome that I can't speak properly." Coincidentally Mr. Obama has the same problem whenever he sees his own reflection in a teleprompter.

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal has found Democrats joining his side as he rallies for school choice, even some who helped kill a voucher bill before Hurricane Katrina. (Associated Press)

EDITORIAL: Cooling the car

Years ago, there was a hole in the ozone layer that was going to kill us all. Once the government banned aerosol hairspray and Freon, the stuff that made air conditioners and refrigerators work, the frenzy subsided. Now the government-mandated replacement for Freon, a chemical that goes by the name of R-134a, will end life as we know it. The White House is about to add the chemical to the list of prohibited substances, along with asbestos, anthrax and carbon dioxide.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Intruder's success shows patrol ineffectiveness

The White House is usually the halfway point on one of my bike routes from Virginia, so I know how the security is laid out on Pennsylvania Avenue directly in front of the president's residence. There are always a minimum of three foot patrolmen a few feet from the sidewalk. Tourists take up the sidewalk and usually there are a few demonstrators.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The '40s: The Story of a Decade'

If the 1940s gave the United States its "Greatest Generation," then it would seem from this collection that it also gave The New Yorker magazine its greatest decade.

In this photo provided by the Houston mayor's office, Houston Mayor Annise Parker, right and her long-time partner, First Lady Kathy Hubbard, celebrate at their wedding Thursday, Jan 16, 1014 in Palm Springs, Calif. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Paul Fromberg, rear, rector of St. Gregory of Nyssa Episcopal Church in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Houston Office of The Mayor, Richard Hartog)

EDITORIAL: Houston's chilling bid to silence the pulpits

Applying the name of "marriage" to homosexual unions is said by the lavender lobby to be an issue of equal rights. However, when the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act last year, the left began applying pressure on those who hold to traditional values, betraying a mindless intolerance of anyone who disagrees.