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Madness! Even the giraffes have gone crazy

- The Washington Times

We owe Chicken Little an apology. Maybe the sky really is falling. Evidence is everywhere. Cries and whimpers suddenly grow deafening as the landscape is dusted with snowflakes, who imagine they’re unique and have in common with other snowflakes only an extremely low melting point.

Chart to accompany Rahn article of Aug. 22, 2017.

The price-level dilemma

Is more inflation desirable? Those at the Federal Reserve seem to think so, and they have explicitly said their target is 2 percent, or about double the current level.

Illustration on removing Confederate statues and monuments by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

Historical hysteria

We will learn even less from history if we wipe it clean, as some are trying to do by removing statues of Confederate leaders whose beliefs about slavery and race most, including me, find offensive. Conversation beats censorship.

Illustration on anarchist and totalitarian strains in the leftist Antifa movement by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Old hatreds made new

Amid the chaos of Charlottesville, two specters from the previous century’s darkest hours have re-emerged. Alongside the well-publicized Nazi symbols on full display during the “Unite the Right” rally, so too were Communist hammers and sickles brandished by the opposing anti-fascist or “Antifa” protesters.

Illustration on Mitch McConnell by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Forgetting McConnell’s greatest achievement

Mitch McConnell has been taking quite a beating from President Trump for failing to get a health care reform bill through the Senate, but even Mr. Trump has largely conceded that John McCain, alone blew up the majority leader’s painstakingly crafted compromise.

Presidential Courage Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

North Korea and fear

At the heart of the Cold War, the ever-present nuclear threat had a profound effect on the American psyche. Children hiding under desks during air raid drills during the 1960s and 1970s had longer-term implications in terms of mental and physical health as studies in the 1980s revealed.

Union Vote Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Union workers celebrate right-to-work laws

As summer temperatures continue in the 90s, August beachgoers aren’t the only ones feeling the heat. In Missouri, union employees are getting burned by efforts to block implementation of right-to-work.

Smoking Gun Flash Drive Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Rohrabacher-Assange meeting

- The Washington Times

California Rep. Dana Rohrabacher’s recent three-hour meeting with WikiLeaks head Julian Assange as reported earlier this week by The Hill may prove interesting in light of the allegations of several former high-ranking U.S. intelligence analysts that the Democratic National Committee was not hacked by the Russians or anyone else prior to last fall’s presidential election.

Illustration on the results of automatic voter registration law by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Guarding election integrity

In 1993, when President Clinton signed the National Voter Registration Act (NVRA), its boosters claimed that it would solve, once and for all, a plethora of problems plaguing the nation’s voter registration rolls.

The Extinction of the Republican Party Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Replacing the Republican Party

Having refused to repeal Obamacare, the Republican Party is dead, as was the Whig Party in 1854 after it colluded in the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act which opened these territories to slavery.

Illustration on Putin's long-term strategy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Putin’s strategy and the U.S. response

At the end of the Cold War, Russia was a facsimile of itself. Shorn of empire, the Russians appeared to be a weak regional power, if that.

Trump’s record on race

One lesson I’ve learned from working for Donald Trump is that you have to pay attention to what he does, not what he says. The left and the media are on a rampage accusing President Trump of being a racist and Nazi-KKK sympathizer because of his words in response to the horrid events in Charlottesville.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Democrats search for another Lost Cause

- The Washington Times

Union scouts have already discovered Robert E. Lee at the gates of the city, lining up the gallant Pelham’s artillery to fire the opening round, and Stonewall Jackson and Jeb Stuart are expected to arrive on a night train from the Shenandoah Valley.

Illustration on diplomatic options for North Korea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘Red-teaming’ the diplomatic option in Korea

Should President Trump meet personally with Kim Jong-un? John Glover, a graduate student at George Mason University wrote an article advocating such a meeting and, frankly, I think that he’s on to something.

Related Articles

Emir of Qatar Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani talks late Friday, July21, 2017 in his first televised speech since the dispute between Qatar and three Gulf countries and Egypt, in Doha, Qatar. Qatar's ruling emir says the embattled Gulf nation remains open to dialogue with four Arab countries that have isolated it, but that and resolution to the crisis must respect his country's sovereignty. (Qatar News Agency via AP)

Restrain Qatar to counter the Shia terror hegemon in Middle East

The Arab Gulf alliance of Saudi Arabia, Egypt, UAE, and Bahrain recently reinstated their 13 demands on Qatar to restore relations and end sanctions. "We reiterate the importance of Qatar's compliance with the 13 demands outlined by the four states," said a joint statement released by the foreign ministers on July 31.

In this combination photo, director Spike Lee, left, appears at the premiere of "Touched With Fire" on Feb. 10, 2016, in New York and San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick appears at a news conference on Jan. 1, 2017, after an NFL football game against the Seattle Seahawks in Santa Clara, Calif. On Aug. 8, 2017, Lee tweeted an advertisement for an Aug. 23, 2017, rally for Kaepernick outside the NFL's New York City headquarters. (AP Photo/Files)

Colin Kaepernick, so bad he needs a rally

- The Washington Times

Colin Kaepernick is in a bit of a bind. He used to be a quarterback of somewhat high esteem with the 49ers. But that was pre-2016. Now football fans know him as struggling and unsigned -- and non-football fans know him as the guy with the 'fro who despises his country so much he spent a significant portion of 2016 kneeling during the playing of the national anthem.

Hillary Clinton, the wanna-be preacher

- The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton wants to be a spiritual leader. That's right. Post-epic election fail, the woman whose face and name have become synonymous with Political Scandal wants to reinvent with religion. Odd? Well, consider this: There is a lot of money to be made in the selling of God's word.

Trump's 200 days short on GOP support

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump's administration, just rounding the corner into 200 days of leadership, has fallen short of realizing a key campaign promise, the repeal of Obamacare. Thanks go to Republicans for that failure.

The insurance compulsion

Venezuela is the latest global disaster caused by socialism. Over the last couple of hundred years, virtually every variety of socialism has been tried -- from communism to national socialism (Nazism) and fascism, to various varieties of "democratic socialism" -- with one common characteristic -- they all failed.

Illustration on unreliable alternate power by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The high cost of unreliable power

The climate obsessions of the Obama administration yielded a substantial myopia with respect to the other central goals of energy policy, the cost and reliability of the electric power system in particular.

Illustration on the deteriorating Venezuela situation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The coming collapse of Venezuela

- The Washington Times

As U.S. policymakers fret about Syria, Afghanistan, Ukraine and North Korea, far too little attention is being paid to the powder keg to the south of us that may be about to blow. Once-prosperous Venezuela has been coming apart for years, but the roundly condemned Constituent Assembly election engineered by presidential strongman Nicolas Maduro lit the fuse that could ignite a civil war in his country. With a Sunday attack by uniformed insurgents on a military base, the internecine battle may have already begun.

Illustration on PETA's attempts at insinuating itself into the Trump administration by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Dogging the Trumps

This past weekend saw the annual Animal Rights Conference take place just outside our nation's capital. The event is a who's who of activists from People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), the Humane Society of the United States, and like-minded groups that converge to discuss tactics for getting rid of meat, ice cream, circuses, zoos, aquariums, leather belts and silk shirts.

Former Vice President Al Gore. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

When life gets tough for just about everybody

- The Washington Times

Life is tough, as the man said, and three out of three people die. It's apparently a lot worse than we thought. The world is coming apart at the seams, just like the naysayers said it would. Times have got so tough that you can't even trust fake news.

Confirmation of Christopher Wray as FBI Director Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A steady hand in an unsteady time

The FBI is the premier investigative agency in the world, with more than 35,000 agents and staff working all around the globe. The men and women of the FBI work diligently to disrupt and prevent terrorist attacks on America and to preserve the liberties of all Americans by upholding and enforcing the rule of law.

A famed novelist and his fatal hubris

You've really got to respect a novelist's biographer who begins his book with a quote like this from its subject: "Scott Fitzgerald once wrote, 'There never was a good biography of a novelist. There couldn't be. He is too many people if he is any good.' "

Get rid of RINOs

We currently have a small number of RINOS blocking the president's agenda — and the leadership does nothing. It's time play hardball, stop the talk and take action. First, strip those RINOS of their influential committee and chairmanship assignments. Second, let them know that there will be no Republican funds for them when they run for reelection. Lastly, change the archaic rules of the Senate and let those who oppose know we won, you lost. President Obama did it.

Empower states to end Obamacare

I have followed Obamacare since its inception and now realize its purpose was to empower the federal government with our health care. That didn't work because it violated the Constitution. To reverse Obamacare, the Republicans must do the opposite: empower the states. That should be the premise and theme of the Republican health-care bill.