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Illustration on the current mixed feelings over our national heritage by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Beautiful for a patriot’s dream

Approaching the first Fourth of July in the time of Trump, a holiday Americans also call “Independence Day,” it’s hard to find much independent thinking. Polarized rages and rants follow red and blue patterns of division, deepening the fragmentation of national unity and making patriotic pride suspect. Verbal fireworks are today’s “bombs bursting in air.”

Illustration on the latest Supreme Court decisions by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Two wins for Trump

The Supreme Court’s decision to allow portions of President Trump’s travel ban to proceed is a much-needed victory for the administration. The high court ruled that those “who lack any bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States” could be denied entry into the U.S. The ban targets those from six majority-Muslim countries, halting entry until “extreme vetting” can be conducted.

Persecution of Christians Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Evangelicals, the last holdouts on gay marriage line

- The Washington Times

Resistance and opposition to same-sex marriage has been crumbling among Americans — save for one specific segment of society that’s proving the last wall to even wider acceptance: Evangelicals. Standing strong on the side of scripture on this point is going to prove lonely, not to mention intense.

Illustration on the unwise course of Democrats in their attacks on President Trump by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The progressive boomerang

The progressive strategy of investigating President Trump nonstop for Russian collusion or obstruction of justice or witness tampering so far has produced no substantial evidence of wrongdoing.

North Korea Dilemma Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

North Korea’s wake-up call

The horrific death of Otto Warmbier should be a wake-up call to the United States and China that we are failing terribly with North Korea. Kim Jong-un appears indifferent to the death of this young American held hostage in Pyongyang and with the continued detention of three Americans.

Climate-friendly Midwest Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A state-based response to climate change

Rapid environmental change is a significant global challenge with wide-reaching impacts to national security, business continuity and global health. Even as the White House withdraws the United States from the Paris Accords, the effects of climate change are already being felt today in our local communities.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., confers with Sen. Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, left, before the start of a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, June 20, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Have you heard? Warren has another regulatory overreach idea

Consider, as an important case study, Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s drive to regulate personal hearing aids, known as PSAPs (personal sound amplification products). Her legislative vehicle is the Federal Drug Administration reauthorization bill, which needs to pass in the next couple months. The bill would impose new FDA regulations on existing PSAPs, preempting state laws and regulations that have been on the books for decades.

Illustration on dealing with the rise of violent Shariaists in the U.S. after the demise of the ISIS caliphate by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Fending off ISIS and Shariah

Do I detect a note of desperation in how some of my fellow Americans discuss how to treat terrorism, specifically the Islamic State, or ISIS? ISIS has grown from a small group of brutes back in President Obama’s time committing various heinous crimes into a small army consisting of a few thousand, perhaps tens of thousands committing heinous crimes.

Illustration on the thought of Michael Lind by Linus Garsys/The Washington Times

A new role for America

If you’re puzzled by the swirl of geopolitical forces besetting the globe, and the debates unleashed by that swirl as to the nature of the world we will inherit or should inherit, then you must read Michael Lind’s cover article in the current issue of The National Interest.

Democrats New Hobby Horse Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Democrats’ sudden concern for election integrity

When the Democratic Party and its deep-state allies’ favorite anti-Trump columnist begins to sour on the promise of a Russian collusion probe, it is time to start looking for a consolation prize. Based on the overnight interest in all things voting security, they seem to have found a new hobby horse.

Intrusive Government Data Collection Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A Supreme Court call on the third party doctrine

This week, constitutional law experts and the law enforcement community were abuzz after the U.S. Supreme Court added Carpenter v. United States to its docket, a case that could reshape government data collection and the Fourth Amendment in the internet Age.

Related Articles

FBI Evidence Response Team members mark evidence at the scene of a multiple shooting in Alexandria, Va., Wednesday, June 14, 2017, involving House Majority Whip Steve Scalise of La., and others during a congressional baseball practice. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

We don't need gun control -- we need Democrat control

- The Washington Times

Terry McAuliffe, Virginia's Democratic governor, suggested gun control was needed in the aftermath of a shooting that left Republican Rep. Steve Scalise injured. But given all the angry rhetoric and uprisings those on the left have fueled lately, it would seem guns aren't really the problem. Democrats are.

Illustrations on the implications of the religious Left's renewed participation in politics by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The religious left's second coming

The religious left feels left out. According to an article in The New York Times, liberal clergy feel excluded from the political arena and blame the religious right for occupying what they once believed was their exclusive territory. They are, according to the story's headline, "seeking to break right's grip on nation's moral agenda."

Obamacare Death Panel Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Saving money but costing lives

Buried deep within Obamacare is a provision that takes away health care from you and your doctors, by taking away payment for critical health care that may be needed to save your life. It is called The Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB).

On Nov. 11, 1989, East German border guards are seen through a gap in the Berlin Wall after demonstrators pulled down a segment of the wall at the Brandenburg Gate, Berlin. Associated Press photo

When the Berlin Wall began to crack

Thirty years ago this week Ronald Reagan stood up on a podium in what was then West Berlin, framed by the Brandenburg Gate behind him. Through a thick sheet of bulletproof glass, he gazed at the ugly concrete symbol of the Cold War, the Berlin Wall, and addressed the most famous words of his presidency to Mikhail Gorbachev, the leader of the Soviet empire: "Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall."

Illustration on the U.S. ambassador to the Holy See by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

An able ambassador to the Holy See

America should welcome the nomination of Callista Gingrich as the 11th U.S. ambassador to the Holy See. Mrs. Gingrich brings the necessary skill sets to navigate the sometimes labyrinthine interface between politics and the Catholic Church.

Matching Government Tenants with Jobs Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A path out of poverty

Government should be a means of empowerment, not dependency, as well as a safety net. As President Trump discusses building America's workforce, public housing has a role in that discussion. Those who receive housing assistance must have a path toward jobs, wealth creation and economic improvement. We must remove attitudes, regulations, policies and programs that reinforce dependence.

In this May 3, 2017, file photo, FBI Director James Comey listens on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

How 'showboater' Comey screwed up

What gets James Comey in trouble is that he leaked official memos that were most probably classified. He should have turned them over to the FBI or somewhere else in the Justice Department and then simply kept his mouth shut. And if he didn't trust anybody at the department, he should have sent the memos on to the congressional intelligence committees (and thereby been protected as a whistleblower).

President Donald Trump walks to his vehicle after visiting MedStar Washington Hospital Center in Washington, Wednesday, June 14, 2017, where House Majority Leader Steve Scalise of La. was taken after being shot in Alexandria, Va., during a Congressional baseball practice. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The consent of the governed

Last week, when former FBI Director James Comey gave his long-awaited public testimony about his apparently rough-and-tumble relationship with President Trump, he painted a bleak picture. The essence of Mr. Comey's testimony was that the president asked him to drop an investigation of retired Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn -- Mr. Trump's former national security adviser -- and then asked him to do so in return for keeping his job as FBI director and then fired him for not obeying his order.

The wrong cure for a real crisis

One of the problems with a book titled "The Crisis of the Middle-Class Constitution" is that, more than two centuries after ratification of that document, we still have no real consensus on exactly what is meant by the term "middle class."

A few morals go a long way

It seems that so many in the world disobey God's Ten Commandments on a regular basis -- and in a big way. But just think: If everyone obeyed the Fifth Commandment ("Thou shalt not kill") we could all live in our homes and walk or ride safely and freely on streets and across bridges anywhere in the world.

Comey's coup

The malice aforethought and intent evident in former FBI Director James Comey's Senate testimony last week make it crystal-clear that Mr. Comey was actively working for and planning a soft coup from his very first meeting with President Trump. No other conclusion can be drawn from Mr. Comey's immediate efforts to interrupt his and the president's conversations.

President Donald Trump speaks in the Diplomatic Room of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, June 14, 2017, about the shooting in Alexandria, Va. where House Majority Whip Steve Scalise of La., and others, where shot during a Congressional baseball practice. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

A shooting war on Republicans

The only person responsible for shooting up a congressional baseball practice Wednesday in Alexandria, wounding a Republican congressman and several aides, is James Thomas Hodgkinson, 66, of Belleville, Ill. He died of a gunshot wound, but it was brought on by the rage in Democratic ranks of Trump Derangement Syndrome.

In this May 21, 2017, file photo provided by The Public Theater, Tina Benko, left, portrays Melania Trump in the role of Caesar's wife, Calpurnia, and Gregg Henry, center left, portrays President Donald Trump in the role of Julius Caesar during a dress rehearsal of The Public Theater's Free Shakespeare in the Park production of Julius Caesar in New York. Teagle F. Bougere, center right, plays as Casca, and Elizabeth Marvel, right, as Marc Anthony. Delta Air Lines is pulling its sponsorship of New York's Public Theater for portraying Julius Caesar as the Donald Trump look-alike in a business suit who gets knifed to death on stage, according to its statement Sunday, June 11, 2017. (Joan Marcus/The Public Theater via AP)

The high price of free speech

The First Amendment is the most precious of all the rights enumerated in the Constitution, and it's a pity that Americans actually know so little about it. The First Amendment guarantees the right of Americans to say whatever they please, even the ugly and the irresponsible, but it does not guarantee there won't be a price to pay for saying certain things.