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Tax Reform for Economic Growth Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Thinking clearly about tax reform

President Trump has said he is going to move on to tax reform after the debacle with Obamacare repeal. Is there any reason that we can expect greater success with the tax reform effort? I argue no, unless the rules in the House and Senate are modified, and those in Congress, whose brains are connected enough to distinguish between tax rates and tax revenues, take control.

President Donald Trump arrives to sign various bills in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, Monday, March 27, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Less personality, more policy

In the aftermath of the debacle over the Republican effort to repeal and replace Obamacare, President Trump can learn a valuable lesson that will serve him well in the next battle over tax reform and other issues.

Illustration on the situation of the Korean peninsula by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Possibilities for reunifying the Korean Peninsula

With North Korea threatening its sixth nuclear test, and the pace of its ballistic-missile tests quickening, Pyongyang’s global threat is ever more imminent. Twenty-five years of self-defeating American efforts to negotiate with the world’s only hereditary Communist dictatorship have, not surprisingly, proven fruitless.

Illustration on Ross Perot's fiscal warnings    The Washington Times

The sagacity of Ross Perot

Exhibit A is the national debt, which reached $20 trillion this year — or $164,000 for every income taxpayer in the country. Because politicians don’t have a plan to address this issue that satisfies most of their constituency, they operate as if it doesn’t exist.

Obamacare Repeal Failure Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Botching the Obamacare repeal

As of last week, House Speaker Paul Ryan’s crumbling halfway house — known officially as the American Health Care Act — definitively collapsed.

North Korean Nuclear War Threat Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The North Korean war scare

In 2015 the Intelligence Community declassified The 1983 Soviet “War Scare” — the definitive report by the president’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board on how and why the USSR nearly launched a preemptive nuclear strike during the NATO theater nuclear exercise ABLE ARCHER-83, held in November 1983.

Illustration on U.S./Saudi cooperation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Resetting U.S.-Saudi relations

Saudi Arabia is looking forward to a resumption of strong and friendly relations with the U.S. following the recent visit of Saudi Deputy Crown Prince bin Salman with President Trump at the White House.

Illustration on the GOP and the Federal budget by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Republican budget woes

President Trump and Republicans in Congress have a once in a generation opportunity to dramatically roll back the frontiers of government but will likely fall short because of their lack of candor and finesse.

FILE - In this Dec. 1, 2016, file photo, President-elect Donald Trump speaks at the Carrier Corp. factory in Indianapolis. The $7 million deal to save jobs at the Carrier factory in Indianapolis is poised for approval by state officials nearly four months after President Donald Trump celebrated his role in the negotiations with a post-election visit to the plant. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings, File)

Steering attention left

Meanwhile, here on Earth, mainstream websites, newspapers, TV and radio trash President Trump incessantly. Consumer confidence gallops? New jobs bulge? The stock market soars? Immaterial. The president is teetering, according to reports that so many Americans follow. Just stroll through a recent day’s snippet at Yahoo and you see not one positive angle. Only these:

Huey P. Long (Associated press)

Here comes the judge

- The Washington Times

Neil Gorsuch took the best shots, such as they were, of disheartened, dismayed and despondent Democrats this week, and nobody laid a glove on him. He was as fresh when it was over as when the slugging, such as it was, began.

Working Together to Stop Nuclear Terror Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The growing threat of nuclear terrorism

The greatest challenge to global security is the nuclear threat from rogue states, led by North Korea and Iran. There will be no progress in ensuring global nuclear stability without cooperation between the United States and Russia. This should be a major priority for Presidents Trump and Putin. Much has been made of states trying to secure their borders against terrorist threats. While it is essential that borders are secured, terrorism is tackled and hatred confronted, we cannot ignore the greatest contemporary threat of all, nuclear attacks. It feels remote and unlikely, but is a very clear and present danger.

Related Articles

Upgrading National Defense Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Nuclear missile surprises

The United States and its allies, informed largely by opinions of Washington foreign policy and media elites, have for years regarded nuclear weapon and missile programs in North Korea, Iran, and Pakistan as technologically primitive.

Get government out of health care

I don't want Ryancare, I don't want Trumpcare and I definitely do not want Obamacare. The latter has wrecked the economy and therefore many people's livelihoods. House Speaker Paul Ryan says we have to save the system. What system? Ryan says he's been working on it for 20 years. That just makes him even more of a fool.

Obamacare worse than GOP fix

I am no fan of the GOP's Obamacare replacement plan, but as an engineer I always must evaluate the 'do-nothing' option. The Congressional Budget Office has said that under the replacement plan, 24 million people will lose health-care coverage by 2026. But how many people will lose their coverage under Obamacare by 2018?

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., speaks with reporters as Democrats criticize the Republican health care plan, at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, March, 14, 2017. The White House and Republican leaders in Congress are scrambling to shore up support for their health care bill after findings from the Congressional Budget Office estimated that 14 million people would lose insurance coverage in the first year alone under the GOP replacement for Obamacare. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Taking brickbats to the wall

Barack Obama is gone from the White House, but his malign influence hangs over Washington like a blue haze. He failed to "fundamentally transform" America, but Democrats who made his slogan their own refuse to surrender the defeated cause. Despite the fact that Donald Trump has occupied the Oval Office for nearly two months, the opposition party stubbornly acts in concert with the "not my president" crowd. Their tune sounds dangerously close to "not my nation."

'Enforcement matters, deterrence matters'

Perhaps it's a variant of Mitt Romney's notion of "self-deportation," but President Trump's tough talk on illegal immigration is discouraging the waves of illegal immigration even before the first brick or cinder block is laid in what he calls his "big, beautiful" wall on the border.

In this March 9, 2017, file photo, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif. speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. Speaking about health care, Tuesday, March 14, 2017, Pelosi said the GOP measure is "very, very cruel. It must be stopped." (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Pelosi's Twitter feed: It's still the repeal, stupid

- The Washington Times

Be careful what you ask for, as the saying goes. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi learned the hard way not to ask unfiltered, un-vetted constituents for their stories on Obamacare -- because what she heard back was hardly what she wanted.

FILE- In this Thursday, April 21, 2016 file photo, President Barack Obama, with Saudi Arabia's King Salman, right, speaks after a Gulf Cooperation Council session at the Diriyah Palace in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. When President Donald Trump meets with Saudi Arabias Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman at the White House in the coming days, the new commander-in-chief will be laying the groundwork for his administrations relations with a Middle Eastern powerhouse and the worlds top oil exporter. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Sharia is not compatible in U.S. -- and here's why

- The Washington Times

Gotta love the Sharia. Our good friends in Saudi Arabia, the ones we dare not criticize for human rights issues because of strategic national security reasons, have launched a girls' council to help on the women's rights' public affairs front -- but unfortunately, it's Wahhabi style.

Nicole Perry joins other members of the transgender community who oppose Senate Bill 6 in a protest at the Texas Capitol as the Senate State Affairs Committee holds hearings on the bill, Tuesday, March 7, 2017, in Austin, Texas. The transgender "bathroom bill" would require people to use public bathrooms and restrooms that correspond with the sex on their birth certificate. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

'Toni the Tampon' -- speechless (almost)

- The Washington Times

Forget Dr. Seuss. The new Cat in the Hat on the block is "Toni the Tampon," a character devised by children's author Cass Clemmer to show kiddies 'round the nation that men, not just women, can menstruate.

Folders containing amendments to the GOP's "Obamacare" replacement bill are spread on a conference table on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, March 9, 2017, as members of the House Energy and Commerce Committee worked through the night. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Republicans gone drunk on health care power

- The Washington Times

Come on, Republicans. Have you gone commie? How else to explain this, from CNN: "While Republicans are pushing to drop the requirement of Obamacare that compels Americans to get insurance, another move in a separate bill could compel employees to participate in workplace wellness programs that collect their and their families' health and genetic data."

In this March 9, 2017, file photo, House Speaker Paul D. Ryan of Wis. uses charts and graphs to make his case for the GOP's long-awaited plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Paul 'never defend Trump' Ryan exposed as two-faced

- The Washington Times

Wow -- this is like a "Girls Gone Wild" tape for the political world. House Speaker Paul D. Ryan, the Republican public servant from Wisconsin, was captured on audio during the campaign season saying he'd never defend Donald Trump. Not then. Not ever.

Trump wiretap brouhaha raises Patriot vs. Patriot Act fight

- The Washington Times

The media's been filled with busy bees lately, painting President Donald Trump with the crazy stick and demanding he produce proof of Barack Obama's wiretap of Trump Tower -- but what has happened to America, land of the free, country of the Constitution, that wiretapping one's own citizens has become so believable?

Maintaining Accurate Voter Registration Records Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The dirty work behind clean elections

As the White House prepares to set up a commission focused on potential voting irregularities, election officials from across the nation are busy conducting statutorily required voter list maintenance to ensure their rolls are ready ahead of the next vote. It's an important part of protecting the integrity of our nation's elections and saving vital taxpayer dollars.

Ambassador Sergey Kislyak (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Paranoia is what's for dinner in Washington

- The Washington Times

Paranoia is suddenly what's for dinner in Washington. The most fervent patriot can be a spy and never know it until someone posts a video of the high crime and misdemeanor of someone shaking a Russian hand.

The Great Pumpkin Rises Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

America's longest war

Gov. Andrew Cuomo wants to spend $1.4 billion of New York's resources to solve the persistent problem of poverty in central Brooklyn. If he wins legislative approval, Mr. Cuomo, a Democrat, intends to spend the money on affordable housing, job training, anti-violence programs, recreational space, even obesity. Some cynics suggest the proposal is targeted at boosting Mr. Cuomo's presidential prospects in 2020, but let's give him the benefit of the doubt and take his proposals seriously.

Illustration on the U.S. dealing with rogue nuclear powers by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The risk of rogue nukes

Nuclear Russia and China are America's major geopolitical adversaries and national security risks. Nevertheless, for decades we have steadily improved relations with these countries and the risk of war with them is low. Our top national security risks are unpredictable rogue states that are developing missiles to carry out a nuclear attack on America. Our foreign policy and military strategy should adjust accordingly.