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Illustration on the Clinton campaign by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How Hillary doomed her ‘inevitable presidency’

While we’re examining the accomplishments of Donald Trump’s first 100 days — putting his man on the U.S. Supreme Court is the biggie — Hillary is getting the once-over (and the second and third) for all the reasons why she’s not the first woman to preside over her own first 100 days in the Oval Office.

Illustration on the Trump White House decision to broaden media access by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Talking right

President Trump did something Monday I have long advocated. He met with a small group of conservative journalists, pundits and radio talk show hosts. I was among them.

Illustration on the dangerous complications of the Obama/Iran nuke deal by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Tangled in Obama’s Iran nuclear trap

On April 18, the State Department certified Iran to be in compliance with its commitments under the Iran nuclear deal (Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA). As France’s iconic foreign minister, the Marquis de Talleyrand, once reportedly said: “This was worse than a crime; it was a mistake.”

Illustration on the sources of Trump's ideas by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The anatomy of a Trump decision

When Donald Trump’s Florida lawyer Paul Rampell first proposed turning the future president’s Mar-a-Lago estate into a private club, Mr. Trump pronounced the idea “dumb.” Over the next month, Messrs. Rampell and Trump argued back and forth about the idea until Mr. Trump finally agreed with Mr. Rampell.

DAY 40 - In this Feb. 28, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump, flanked by Vice President Mike Pence and House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., gestures on Capitol Hill in Washington, before his address to a joint session of Congress. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, file)

Ending the threats of a government shutdown

We are looking at another potential federal government shutdown this week. The high drama over passing a budget, passing spending bills under regular order, and the lifting of the debt ceiling has gone on for far too many years.

Illustration on a possible replay of 1927 for the Democrat party in 2020 by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Will 2020 be another 1972 for Democrats?

The year 1968 was a tumultuous one that saw the assassinations of rival candidate Sen. Robert F. Kennedy and civil rights icon Martin Luther King Jr. Lyndon Johnson’s unpopular lame-duck Democratic administration imploded due to massive protests against the Vietnam War.

Democrats can’t chart their way forward in this wilderness

Like most minority parties that lose the White House, the Democratic Party is without a national leader. Their legislative caucuses in the House and Senate have elected leadership, but the party itself has several elected officials fighting to lead it into the future, all with an eye toward 2020. And the party’s most visible figures aren’t exactly fresh faces.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton gives an acceptance speech after accepting the Trailblazer Award during the LGBT Community Center Dinner at Cipriani Wall Street on Thursday, April 20, 2017, in New York. (AP Photo/Kevin Hagen) ** FILE **

The Democratic Party’s ‘Gong Show’

Finally, the Democrats admit it wasn’t the Russians, James B. Comey or sexism that brought Hillary Clinton down. We are now told by journalists, leading Democrats, and even a former Democratic presidential candidate, that it was the inept dysfunction of the party itself, Hillary, and her abused and frightened team that has reduced them all to irrelevant, vapid political busybodies.

FILE - In this March 18, 2017 file photo, Congressional candidate Rob Quist meets with supporters during the annual Mansfield Metcalf Celebration dinner hosted by the state's Democratic Party in Helena, Montana. He is trying to fire up the party faithful in his race against Republican Greg Gianforte in a May 25 special election to fill Montana's sole congressional seat. (AP Photo/Bobby Caina Calvan, File)

Hiding his socialism beneath a cowboy hat

- The Washington Times

Fresh from special election defeats in Kansas and Georgia, Democratic professionals and activists alike are focusing on the election to fill Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s Montana congressional seat as one more chance to chip away at the Republican majority in the House.

Afghanistan Peace Plan Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Resolving the Afghanistan crisis

The U.S.-led war in Afghanistan has not only continued unabated for over 15 years, making it America’s longest war, but has no end in sight.

In this April 25, 2017 photo provided by ABC 7 Eyewitness News in New York, a wooden hammock lay on the sidewalk in New York. Police say that an tourist from England was injured and taken to the hospital when the hammock fell from the building she was talking near and struck her. Police believe wind may have blown the wooden framed hammock off the building's terrace. (ABC 7 Eyewitness News via AP)

Taking the cuffs off the cops

The Obama Justice Department made a habit of federalizing local police forces by threatening litigation and securing a settlement in the form of a consent decree. That turned out to be an exercise in anti-police bias which, happily, Attorney General Jeff Sessions is now reversing.

Related Articles

In this April 28, 2014, file photo, the Phoenix VA Health Care Center in Phoenix. The Veterans Affairs Department unveiled a new website Wednesday, April 12, 2107, aimed at providing information on the quality of care at VA medical centers, touting new accountability even as it grappled with fresh questions of patient safety in its beleaguered health system.  (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)

Why can't we take care of our sick veterans?

- The Washington Times

A director at the Department of Veterans Affairs in Washington, D.C., was just removed from his post after a government watchdog blasted the facility for unsanitary conditions. But the director wasn't fired -- only demoted. And he wasn't even named in the VA's announcement of his demotion-- as if we're still trying to protect those who can't even protect our nation's most honorable.

White House press secretary Sean Spicer speaks to moderator Greta Van Susteren at the Newseum in Washington, Wednesday, April 12, 2017, during "The President and the Press: The First Amendment in the First 100 Days" forum. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Sean Spicer's humble apology a sign of good governance

- The Washington Times

The left is going batty over Sean Spicer's Hitler mishap, mocking and scoffing the White House press secretary for mistakenly stating the former Nazi leader "didn't even sink to using chemical weapons" against citizens or using "gas on his own people" the way Syria's President Bashar Assad did. But Spicer's humble rebound is commendable.

Higher Education Commissioner Joseph Rallo, center, answers questions from House budget committee members while Board of Regents Chairman Richard Lipsey, right, listens, on Wednesday, April 12, 2017, in Baton Rouge, La. (AP Photo/Melinda Deslatte)

The GOP's best choice for education reform

Republicans in control in Washington have to decide whether to exert themselves on a range of issues to improve the economic and social conditions for millions of Americans or merely tinker at the margins with small-potato approaches.

Perils of the Rules of Engagement Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When breaking the rules of engagement is right

Donald Trump and James Mattis came to office vowing to "win" America's wars again. But unless they change our politically correct military culture, it is certain America won't.

Executing the Guily and the Innocent Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Executing the guilty and innocent

Nearly three dozen men sit on death row in Arkansas, where capital punishment has been suspended since 2005. Unless clemency is granted, seven of them -- an eighth man was granted a temporary reprieve -- will be given lethal injections all within a 10-day period, between April 17 and 27.

Illustration on the pregnancy problem in the U.S. Navy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Love Boats sail again

Women can do most things as well as men. Almost nobody any longer disputes that. Women can do some things better than men. Many women thought Donald Trump as president would be a disaster for the final female assault on the glass ceiling. It hasn't turned out quite that way, and women, such as Nikki Haley and Betsy DeVos, have been stars of his new administration.

Ownership of the AR-15 Rifle Included in the Constitution Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why the Second Amendment protects the AR-15

For decades the federal judiciary has been trying to interpret the Second Amendment out of the Constitution. It is, as Sanford Levinson has termed it, an "embarrassment" to an elite class of legal scholars that finds firearms to be unusual and repulsive objects. Now the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has declared that the semi-automatic AR-15 rifle is not covered by the Second Amendment, despite that fact that is the most common rifle sold in the United States. This execrable decision is the latest outrage in a long series of disingenuous judicial contortions.

Maximizing losses

As a macroeconomics student, I agree with Richard Berman ("Minimum wage resistance," Web, March 6). The basic idea behind the minimum-wage hike is good, but there are disadvantages that come with such a law.

The sailors' revolt that influenced an election

A consensus holds that last year's politics were messy; some say the messiest ever, but A. Roger Ekirch tells us otherwise. In 1800 the run-up to the nation's "first full-blown presidential campaign" was messier, and arguably more important in its long-term consequences, though only time can tell.

FILE - In this Jan. 17, 2017, file photo, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., left, speaks during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. Promising to "expose the Republican Party for what it is," Sanders predicted April 12, that President Donald Trump would be a one-term president as the liberal icon prepared to launch a nationwide tour to rally Democrats. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Fizzler in Kansas, surviving hopes in Georgia

Congressional Democrats were counting on two special elections this month to provide the smelling salts to revive their dispirited ranks. The first, on Tuesday in Kansas, fizzled. Now all hope is focused on a reliably red district in the suburbs of Atlanta.

People watch a TV news program showing a file image of the USS Carl Vinson aircraft carrier at Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, April 12, 2017. North Korea's parliament convened Tuesday amid heightened tensions on the divided peninsula, with the United States and South Korea conducting their biggest-ever military exercises and the USS Carl Vinson aircraft carrier heading to the area in a show of American strength. The signs read "The USS Carl Vinson aircraft carrier changes route". (AP Photo/Ahn Yooung-joon)

Calculating the threat from North Korea

"The land of the morning calm" is anything but that. The ancient Korean name for the divided peninsula is belied by the tension simmering for nearly 70 years, enlivened with frequent bursts of cross-border invective and sometimes violence.

Illegals' crime rate 100 percent

This week Attorney General Jeff Sessions directed 94 U.S. attorneys to enforce human-smuggling laws, as well as identity-theft-related and Social-Security-related fraud. (The chief actuary of the Social Security Administration has said that some 75 percent of working illegal aliens use false Social Security numbers).