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George McGovern. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The party’s over and no place to call home

- The Washington Times

That’s the dilemma of the Democrats, forlorn, despondent and walking in circles like the goose hit on the head with a long-handled wooden spoon. They’re asking questions for which there are no happy answers in the wake of their fourth straight loss in a round of special elections.

Illustration of Anne Morgan by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Anne Morgan, an American Hero

The United States was finally in “the war to end all wars.” France had been ravaged since the summer of 1914. Villages and towns were obliterated. Women and children went hungry and homeless as the armies wrestled in futile combat in mud, blood and indescribable filth and disease. The British lost 20,000 dead in a single day at the Battle of the Somme.

Illustration on the decline of medical care quality by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Supporting medicine and its finest practitioners

Treating emergencies isn’t your insurance talking. It’s doctoring. It’s nursing. It’s medical technology. It’s your stone-filled gallbladder obstructing and a top surgeon operating on it without delay. You can’t prove that a junior attending surgeon wouldn’t do just as well, but you can feel it when the wound is healing so well two days later where the angry raw organ was scope-sucked successfully from your body.

Illustration on the devaluation of U.S. bonds by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Uncle Sam’s F-rated bonds

Were the United States any other country, its bonds would have long ago been downgraded to junk.

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan of Wis., speaks to reporters during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 22, 2017. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Paul Ryan is afraid to lead

- The Washington Times

The thing people like about House Speaker Paul D. Ryan is that he is a serious guy who is capable of thinking big and has an ambitious agenda to salvage our ungovernable federal bureaucracy.

Photojournalist Shay Horse said he was pepper-sprayed while covering protests at the Jan. 21 presidential inauguration, even though his camera identified him as a journalist. (Sarah Nelson / The Washington Times)

Is ACLU lawsuit against D.C. cops a red herring?

- The Washington Times

“An officer told us to drop our pants,” Shay Horse said. “An officer went down the row telling each of us not to flinch as he grabbed our balls and yanked on them, and then stuck his finger up each of our anuses and wiggled it around. I felt like they were using molestation and rape as punishment.”

Illustration on the cultural importance of Shakespeare and his play, 'Julius Caesar'              The Washington Times

Donald Trump Julius Caesar mockery reduces Shakespeare

Whether the famous dead Roman is a look-alike for Donald Trump, with a blond comb-over and a long red tie, a cool black dude in a tailored suit suggesting Barack Obama, or a 1930s Orson Welles with a Sam Browne belt resembling Benito Mussolini, the character has captured the imagination of public and players since Shakespeare wrote it more than four centuries ago.

Illustration on the fiscal plight of Puerto Rico by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A sinking feeling in Puerto Rico

The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is drowning. The island, so popular with tourists, is $123 billion in debt. That’s more debt than the $18 billion bankruptcy filed by the city of Detroit in 2013. In May, San Juan declared a form of bankruptcy after creditors filed lawsuits demanding their money. A federal district judge appointed by Chief Justice John Roberts will handle the case.

Illustration on german passivity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Beyond German pacifism

“The Germans are either at your feet or at your throat,” wrote the Roman historian Tacitus 2,000 years ago. Sadly, that axiom is not just ancient history. In the last century, Germany started two world wars, caused the death and suffering of tens of millions, and was responsible for the unspeakable horror of the Holocaust.

President Donald Trump speaks during a rally, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Trump and his generals

Donald Trump earned respect from the Washington establishment for appointing three of the nation’s most accomplished generals to direct his national security policy: James Mattis (secretary of defense), H.R. McMaster (national security adviser) and John Kelly (secretary of homeland security).

Sponsor of Terror Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How Qatar threatens peace

Qatar, a small oil- and gas-rich nation in the Arabian Peninsula, has been boycotted by its neighbors, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain and Egypt. Other nations, including Libya, Maldives, Mauritania, Jordan, Djibouti and Senegal, also have commenced severe diplomatic measures against Qatar.

Illustration of American consul Raymond Geist              The Washington Times

A disingenuous handling of the Jewish refugee issue in ‘Genius’

Albert Einstein was one of the greatest scientists of all time. His contributions to physics revolutionized our understanding of the universe. The current television series based on his life is appropriately titled “Genius.” But did he also help facilitate a mass rescue of Jews from Germany?

In this file photo taken Aug. 31, 2015, a cow grazes at Hickory Hill Milk in Edgefield, S.C. (Susan Ardis/The State via AP)

The fallacy of ‘unhealthy competition’

Just when you thought liberals were focusing only on destroying our government, there is now ample evidence that fellow travelers have been working diligently to destroy the ideas and dreams of our young people.

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On July 3, 2017, the American University in Moscow and the Burganov Museum will unveil a sculpture of Reagan and Gorbachev in downtown Moscow. For additional information please visit www.RussiaHouse.org/wrf.php

America Needs to Recall Reagan's Approach to Russia

Witnessing the unprecedent anti-Russia hysteria in Washington one feels a real danger that it may end badly for everyone as the poisonous rhetoric from politicos and the media gets more out of hand.

Muslim women perform an evening prayer called 'tarawih' marking the first eve of the holy fasting month of Ramadan, at Istiqlal Mosque in Jakarta, Indonesia, Friday, May 26, 2017. During Ramadan, the holiest month in Islamic calendar, Muslims refrain from eating, drinking, smoking and sex from dawn to dusk. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)

Sharia's incompatibility with America on display

- The Washington Times

Sharia law, taken from the Muslim holy book of the Koran as well as from the Hadith -- traditions and sayings handed down from Muhammad that have become enshrined in Islam as law -- is incompatible with the West, with the Constitution and with America.

Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Comey is a 3-act comedy

Cutting into the traditional day time soaps' viewership, former FBI director James Comey's testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee today was hyped by the media as a must-see-TV event of "Super Bowl" and "blockbuster" proportions. Unfortunately for Democrats and drama-hungry media, Comey's three hour testimony--which dismantled much of their Trump-Russia false "collusion" narrative--was anything but the soap opera they expected.

Former FBI Director James Comey reacts after bumping something under the table, during a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, Thursday, June 8, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

'I need loyalty. I expect loyalty'

Former FBI director James Comey erased any doubt this week that President Trump asked him to halt a key part of his investigation into the Russian collusion scandal and insisted on his complete "loyalty."

Illustration on Democrat discord over withdrawal from the Paris Climate Accord by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The political legacy of the Paris Accord departure

Now the Republicans are the party of "the little guy" -- the truckers, the farmers, welders, secretaries, waitresses -- and the Democrats have become the party of the big money interests, Google, Facebook, George Soros, Bloomberg. Nowhere is this better illustrated than by President Trump's withdrawal from the Paris Climate Accord.

Mr. Nunes went to Washington

Rep. Devin Nunes, California Republican., the now-controversial chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, is a bit different from what Washington expects in its politicians.

Former FBI Director James Comey speaks during a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, Thursday, June 8, 2017, in Washington. Associated Press photo

Mr. Comey's not very good day

- The Washington Times

One day of huffing, another day of puffing, and we're just about where we were. Half of us want Donald Trump's presidency to succeed, whether we like everything about the Donald or not, and the other half regards him as the anti-Christ.

Victor Gold    The Washington Times

Remembering Victor Gold

- The Washington Times

Victor Gold died quietly last week. His passing was both unexpected and uncharacteristic for in his 88 years no one who knew him or encountered him would have expected him to do anything quietly. Vic was one of a kind; to say that he was passionate about life, his beliefs, football; his friends and life in general hardly begins to describe the man.

More Air Support for Afghanistan Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Fighting season in Afghanistan

When an explosion rocked Kabul in late May, attention again was drawn to the state of the Afghan security forces. Spring ushers in the fighting season, and the Afghan National Army (ANA) has been losing ground; this is particularly true of the Pakistan border areas where the Pashtun tribal culture is strongest; it was the cradle of the Taliban and remains Taliban's primary sanctuary.

Gillespie for governor

This year's primary election in Virginia has produced great candidates for the Republican Party, and Virginians will have a direct involvement in the selection process. I am particularly pleased to see Ed Gillespie running for governor.

Ever-spoiled, never educated

I am totally flummoxed at the sheer stupidity of what I have just read ("Students berate professor who refused to participate in no-whites 'Day of Absence,'" Web, May 25). This behavior does not constitute a "warning sign"; it is an avalanche.

Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard Burr, R-N.C., right, and Vice Chairman Mark Warner, D-Va., confer as former FBI director James Comey testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 8, 2017.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

When not to roll over the opposition

When Sen. Harry Reid detonated the "nuclear option," eliminating filibusters against nominations of federal district and appellate court judges, he was confident that Democrats would retain their Senate majority in 2014 and hold the White House in 2016, for as long as the wind blows and the rivers run to the sea.

Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks at a joint news conference with Armenian President Serzh Sargsyan after their meeting in the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2016. (Vasily Maximov/Pool Photo via AP)

Under the radar, Russia plays a double game in tense Korean crisis

- The Washington Times

President Trump has made a big deal since his election about his new relationship with Chinese President Xi Jinping, insisting Beijing is "working very hard" to pressure North Korea since the two leaders' meetings at Mar-a-Lago earlier in the year. Mr. Trump seems to be combining China's newfound sympathy to the U.S. position with a "big stick" — three U.S. aircraft carrier battle groups, which rotate off the North Korean coast.