Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

**FILE** Sen. Orrin Hatch, Utah Republican, addresses a crowd during the Utah Republican Party nominating convention, in Sandy, Utah, on April 26, 2014. (Associated Press)

EDITORIAL: The monument man, by executive order

The federal government already owns most of the land in Utah, and Mr. Obama has his eye on a prime parcel of 1.4 million acres near the Canyonlands National Park. With a wave of his autopen, he can banish development, declaring the Greater Canyonlands a “national monument.”

Illustration on "late speaker" children by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When children are late-talkers

Anyone who knows what anxiety, and sometimes anguish, parents go through when they have a child who is still not talking at age two, three or even four, can appreciate what a blessing it can be to have someone who can tell them what to do — and what not to do.

Illustration on Hillary Clinton in 2016 by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

Hillary once more, with feeling

The nightly news shows made it very clear this week that they’ve gotten behind Hillary Clinton’s expected 2016 campaign for president.

Illustration of Eric Holder and the corruption of the Justice Department by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The injustice of Eric Holder

Even we were shocked when we researched our new book, “Obama’s Enforcer: Eric Holder’s Justice Department,” at the extent to which Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. has politicized the Justice Department.

Liberty Bell Dunce Cap Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Faint recognition of Constitution Day

Wednesday is Constitution Day in recognition of the signing of the document in 1787 by members of the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia.

Members of the public walk past a Yes sign which has been graffitied on a wall in Edinburgh, Scotland, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014. The two sides in Scotland's independence debate are scrambling to convert undecided voters, with just two days to go until a referendum on separation. Anti-independence campaigners are pushing home their message that a "No" vote doesn't mean the status quo. The three main British political parties are promising Scotland greater powers, including tax-raising authority, if it remains part of the United Kingdom. The Yes campaign says the promises are vague and reveal the No side's desperation, with polls suggesting the outcome will be close. Scottish Deputy First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said "the only way to guarantee the real powers we need in Scotland is to vote Yes." (AP Photo/Scott Heppell)

What would Braveheart do?

No matter how the vote turns out on Thursday in Scotland, either for independence or continued union with Britain, the disintegration of the Old Continent appears almost inevitable.

Illustration on the broken promise not to fund abortion through Obamacare by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Obamacare’s big spending on abortion on demand

President Obama told lawmakers and the American public in a specially called joint session of Congress on health care reform that “under our plan, no federal dollars will be used to fund abortion.”

George Washington    Portrait by Gilbert Stuart

Scotland the brave, on the brink

- The Washington Times

Old Blighty and Scotland the Brave have a lot of friends in places where it won’t do the kingdom much good this week. The vote on whether to break up the United Kingdom, which seems unbelievable to outsiders, is so close that even the queen is getting into it.

Related Articles

Illustration on America as the world's policeman by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

World's policeman: A job Americans don't want to do

President Obama has been taking a lot of heat for acknowledging he doesn't "have a strategy yet" for dealing with the jihadis butchering Iraqis, Syrians, Christians, Kurds and Yazidis.

ADVANCE FOR SATURDAY, AUG. 30, AND THEREAFTER - FILE - This Aug. 14, 2014, file photo shows New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie as he speaks during a town hall meeting in Ocean City, N.J.  One set of elections ends in early November as another begins when presidential hopefuls cross the unofficial starting line in the 2016 race for the White House. With control of the Senate at stake, the months leading up to the mid-term elections offer a clearer window on a crowd of potential presidential candidates already jockeying for position from Nevada to New Hampshire. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)

Killing the death tax

The estate tax, or "death tax," has been a historical grievance for many American families. Its roots go back to the short-lived stamp tax (1797-1802), and includes the 1862 Revenue Act and 1898 War Revenues Act.

** FILE ** In this Oct. 1, 2009, file photo, Rep. Alan Grayson, D-Fla., listens during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. Grayson is denying he battered his estranged wife and says a video confirms his account. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

EDITORIAL: Militarizing law enforcement

There may be some good to come yet from the unfortunate events in Ferguson, Mo. The Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee will hold a hearing Tuesday about the perils of militarizing law enforcement.

Incoming Washington Post publisher Fred Ryan (Washington Post photo)

The Washington Post makes room for a Republican publisher

- The Washington Times

Changes of command often occupy the most complicated areas of the media marketplace. In quick succession, a family dynasty is about to end at The Washington Post when Katharine Weymouth steps down as publisher on October 1, to be replaced by one Frederick J. Ryan, Jr. Ms. Weymouth was advised of impending change by Washington Post owner Jeff Bezos in mid-August; the news organization went public with it on Tuesday.

NARAL Fetus Scale Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Skewing data to uphold abortion

In a recent article, NARAL Pro-Choice America released a poll making the startling claim that nearly 70 percent of registered voters say the government should not restrict access to abortion.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Hot Dogs and Cocktails'

If it is not quite commonplace for British monarchs to visit the United States these days, it is hard for anyone who hasn't been collecting Social Security for some time to grasp just how big a deal it was when King George VI and his Queen Consort visited the United States in 1939.

Illustration on selling Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Sell Fannie and Freddie, don't kill them

It's time for the U.S. government to sell its ownership stake in Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the two giant mortgage funders, and let them sink or swim by themselves.

Hong Kong Economy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hong Kong's miraculous progress

How did this small city-state of 7.3 million people go from having a per-capita income of only a few hundred dollars per year to a per-capita income that is equal to that of the United States in only 50 years?