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George Washington   From a portrait by Gilbert Stuart

The body politic grows soft and fat

- The Washington Times

The Founding Fathers tried to warn us about runaway partisan outrage, but they didn’t listen to themselves. We’ve been paying for it ever since. Now there’s not much we can do about it.

Better credit card protections

Protecting Americans from online threats is clearly taking a rightful place at the top of Congress’ priority list, evident in the celebration of “Cyber Week” through Friday and the pending introduction of long-anticipated cybersecurity legislation.

The Washington Times celebrates the U.S. Constitution 227 years after ratification. (VIDEO screenshot) ** FILE **

Recovering ‘Our Lost Constitution’

Finding Americans fed up with governmental abuses isn’t hard. They wonder why we have politicians who spend too much, bureaucrats who regulate too much, and officials who limit our freedom at almost every turn.

Illustration on the IMF's chronic misunderstanding the causes of economic growth by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hammering global growth with faulty monetary policy

This past week, the International Monetary Fund again lowered its global economic forecast for 2015. From 2003 to 2007, real global growth in gross domestic product averaged more than 5 percent, but during the last five years it has averaged less than 3 percent. During the last six years of both the Reagan and Clinton administrations, real GDP growth averaged more than 4 percent in the United States, but growth has averaged only a little over 2 percent since the recession bottomed out in 2009.

Illustration on failed civics education in the nation's schools by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Flunking civics means apathy reigns

It’s an old joke, but one that is a commentary on our times. A pollster asks: “What do you think about the level of ignorance and apathy in the country?” The person replies: “I don’t know and I don’t care.”

Putin outwits Obama on Iranian missile deal illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How Putin undermines the Iran deal

Vladimir Putin’s decision to lift Russia’s embargo on the sale of surface-to-air missiles to Iran is a reminder that we have to walk and chew gum at the same time. While we engage in the political self-absorption that consumes us for two out of every four years, we can’t afford to ignore nations such as Russia and Iran, especially when they act in concert.

Illustration on the green economic oppression of American working people by the rich by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Greens against the poor

Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, Elizabeth Warren and the whole gang of Democratic leaders claim that one of their highest priorities is to lift up the middle class and reduce the income gap between rich and poor.

Volunteers tie the wooden cross that was carried through the streets of Etna, Pa., a Pittsburgh suburb, to the larger cross in the cemetery where their annual "Drama of The Cross", service was done on Good Friday, Friday, April 18, 2014. Clergymen from Christian churches in the borough organize a trek with volunteers carrying the wooden cross through borough streets to the cemetery as part of their services for the holiday. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

The preservation of tolerance

In the U.S. and around the world, Christians face extraordinary physical and psychological persecution.

A house is reflected in a puddle of water from an irrigated front yard in San Diego. State regulators on Saturday, April 18, 2015  announced a revised plan to reduce water use in drought-stricken California that offers easier conservation targets for major cities, including Los Angeles, while demanding greater cutbacks from others. The new water reduction targets released by the State Water Resources Control Board responds to criticisms from cities that said earlier targets were unrealistic and unfair. Recognizing that some communities are farther along than others in conservation, the water board released a draft plan last week that requires varying levels of cutbacks for cities to ensure enough water if dry conditions persist. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File)

In California, a flood of missed opportunities

We all learn at an early age to save money for a rainy day. We can’t assume that we’ll always be as healthy or well paid as we are today, so we set something aside to help make it through trying times.

(Associated Press) ** FILE **

The land of the cheerful giver

The Lord loveth a cheerful giver, as the Apostle Paul tells us, and some of the most generous givers are the most cheerful among the faithful, and they live among us in America.

Scimitar canary illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Islamic jihad comes to campus

The world is witnessing a resurgence of global anti-Semitism not seen since the 1930s and the “Final Solution.” In the Middle East, Hitler-admiring regimes like Iran, and Hitler-admiring parties like Hezbollah, Hamas and the Muslim Brotherhood, are openly planning to finish the job the Nazis started. Even in America, until now the most hospitable place outside of Israel for Jews, the atmosphere is more hostile than at any time in the last 70 years.

Illustration on the history of successful presidents passing a "third term" to their political successors by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The odds against a presidential three-peat

Republicans looking ahead to 2016 take heart: History is on your side. For more than a century, only twice has a party held the White House for at least three consecutive presidential elections. Both times, it took each party’s greatest president of this period — Franklin Roosevelt and Ronald Reagan — to accomplished the feat. That fact should be a major concern to Democrats, who will be seeking their party’s third consecutive term on President Obama’s record.

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Illustration on Neville Chamberlain's deal with Hitler and the historical results of appeasing tyranny by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The ghastly shadow of Munich

The Western capitulation to Adolf Hitler in the 1938 Munich Agreement is cited as classic appeasement that destroyed Czechoslovakia, backfired on France and Britain, and led to World War II.

Illustration on tragedy in the midst of Spring's renewal by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When tragedy stalks the season of hope

Tragedy never takes a holiday, and the days just overflowed with fear and grief. A German airliner crashes into the French Alps, and then three buildings in the East Village of New York collapse after a basement explosion, days after a hot plate left unattended to warm food sets fire to a house in Brooklyn, and six of eight children die. Suddenly there's no room in our hearts and minds to think about political tragedy that may be playing out in the Middle East.

Politics and the pulpit illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Indiana's religious freedom conundrum

When Indiana's state legislature approved a bill late last week that seeks to protect the free exercise of religion, churchmen may have been expected to bless the statute. But some won't go there, as it appears the legislation threatens to expose an uncomfortable wound in liberal Christianity.

Will black Republicans ever be less lonely?

Frederick Douglass, the great writer, orator and abolitionist leader, was a trusted adviser to President Abraham Lincoln — and a black Republican. In an Aug. 15, 1888 letter, he famously wrote, "I recognize the Republican party as the sheet anchor of the colored man's political hopes and the ark of his safety."

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence speaks question during a news conference, Tuesday, March 31, 2015, in Indianapolis. Pence said that he wants legislation on his desk by the end of the week to clarify that the state's new religious-freedom law does not allow discrimination against gays and lesbians. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

Bad faith in Indiana

The row over Indiana's religious liberty law breaks new ground in the war between religious liberty and the liberal political agenda. If there's no conflict, you have to make one up. This contretemps blew up out of nowhere, and inquiring minds want to know how and why it happened.

Not all discrimination is bad

It seems to me there is a false underlying assumption about the criticism of Indiana's religious freedom law ("Obama now hits religious freedom in Indiana," Page I, March 30). We are being conditioned to think of all discrimination as bad. I remember when a discriminating shopper was thought of as one who had standards of quality and would only buy products that came up to those standards. Is that type of discrimination bad?

Illustration on the waning of sexual political scandals by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Sex among the goofballs

What is going on in American politics of late? There has not emerged a truly goofball politician since Anthony Weiner, the congressman and later New York mayoral candidate who could not resist sending pictures of his private part so frequently and to so many women, that it really was no longer a private part but rather a public spectacle. Go ahead, Google it. In fact, Yahoo it. My guess is there are dozens of pictures of Mr. Weiner's public private part all over the Internet.

Illustration on Iran's greater ambitions in the Middle East by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Satrapy fishing in the Yemen

Three years ago, film-goers were treated to "Salmon Fishing in the Yemen," which critic Kenneth Turan called a "pleasant fantasy" about the Middle East. Today, of course, Yemen is the hub of a bloody conflict, one which President Obama persists in viewing with equal unreality.

Vote out establishment politicians

Every nation's history has its share of turning points, events that change its course. The great ones are remembered in history. America's best-known recent turning point occurred on Aug. 6, 1945, when the United States cemented its place as the most powerful nation in the history of mankind.

Ornery H.L. Mencken loved baseball

As baseball season thunders down upon us — Go Nats! — let us pause to give loud huzzahs to the Library of America and the Washington writer Marion Elizabeth Rodgers, first for defying self-appointed literary censors, and also for revealing the hidden love of the national pastime by none other than Baltimore's famed scourge of bunkum, H.L. Mencken.

Plane passengers murdered illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When evil flies as co-pilot

Ask yourself this question: When you hear that Andreas Lubitz was "depressed" and had "mental illness," what additional information does this give anyone about the miserable miscreant who killed 149 innocent people by setting an Airbus A320 on a trajectory to crash into the French Alps? Or how to stop the next one?

Illustration on corruption behind Cover Oregon by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Adding corruption to Obamacare incompetence

Deception and unaccountability have plagued Obamacare from the start. First, millions of Americans found out that, contrary to promises, they couldn't keep the health insurance plans they liked. Then a botched website rollout spoiled the law's enrollment debut. Now, in the law's first real tax season, the federal government sent 800,000 enrollees incorrect tax forms.

The U.S. Capitol building is seen through the columns on the steps of the Supreme Court in Washington, May 5, 2014. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A challenge to Congress

When Richard Nixon signed the legislation establishing the Environmental Protection Agency in 1970, he was praised for his vision and commitment to conservation "going forward," though that cliche had yet to be coined. A few critics — "outliers," in another cliche waiting to be born — warned that the EPA could grow into a nightmare of a bureaucracy, but no one paid attention. Jeremiahs are rarely popular at the picnic.

U.S. manufacturing jobs illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Returning to ‘Made in the USA’

Now that the presidential race is in full swing, it's time for robust talking about issues and creating awareness about problems, which only seem to come to light when the American public is focused choosing a new national leader.

The Internal Revenue Service Headquarters (IRS) building is seen in Washington on April 13, 2014. Unscrupulous tax preparers are using President Obama's health care law as a ploy to pocket bogus fines from unsuspecting taxpayers, including some immigrants not bound by the law's requirements, the IRS warned March 13, 2015. (Associated Press)

Ax the income tax

The most efficient solution would junk income taxes altogether in favor of a simple national sales tax.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, second left, U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, left, British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond, center, Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov, second right, and German Foreign Minister Frank Walter Steinmeier wait for the start of a meeting on Iran's nuclear program with other officials from France, China, the European Union and Iran at the Beau Rivage Palace Hotel in Lausanne, Switzerland Tuesday, March 31, 2015. (AP Photo/Brendan Smialowski, Pool)

62 percent of conservative Republicans disapprove of nuclear talks with Iran: Poll

- The Washington Times

As the deadline for nuclear talks with Iran looms, 49 percent of Americans approve of the U.S. negotiating directly with Iran over its nuclear program, 40 percent disapprove says a Pew Research Center poll. "There are deep ideological divisions," the poll says, reporting that 72 percent of liberal Democrats approve of the negotiations, while 62 percent of conservative Republicans disapprove of them.