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Illustration on the damage being done by Obamacare by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Obamacare’s Christmas surprise

Get ready for the largely underreported rule that will allow CMS to change Americans’ health plans without their knowledge.

In this Dec. 17, 2014, file photo, a poster for the movie "The Interview" is carried away by a worker after being pulled from a display case at a Carmike Cinemas movie theater in Atlanta. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

Hollywood cowers at this laff riot over ‘The Interview’

- The Washington Times

Movies may not be better than ever, as a Hollywood marketing slogan in yesteryear boasted they were, but the critics take movies seriously in North Korea. The chief movie critic in Pyongyang can kill a movie with a single review. He might even kill anybody who goes to see it.

Illustration on steps needed to protect U.S. intellectual property by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Lessons from the Sony hack attack

The hacking attack of Sony Corp. and the compromising of its intellectual property should send a wake-up call to American business. If Sony can be hacked, so too can our companies that make defense technologies. This attack reveals that the very innovations that give us our competitive edge in the world, both commercially and strategically, are gravely at risk.

Illustration on continued access to Juvenile criminal records by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Allowing access to juveniles’ records hurts their chances of going straight

By incapacitating violent and dangerous offenders, incarceration can promote public safety. But a point of diminishing returns is reached as prisons sweep in more and more nonviolent, low-risk offenders. These circumstances are even more alarming when you look at the juvenile justice system and consider that 95 percent of youths in this system have committed nonviolent offenses, including some that weren’t even a crime when many of us were kids.

Illustration on Obama's normalization policy towards Cuba by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama adds Cuba to his list of sellouts

President Obama continues to embrace low-tier, go-it-alone executive actions to pad the last two years of his mistake-filled, empty-agenda presidency in a hopeless hunt for a legacy. His arrogant decision this week to re-establish diplomatic relations with communist Cuba is the latest example of a president desperately searching for something do without having to deal with Congress.

Illustration on the need to identify Islamic terrorism for what it is by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Suicide by political correctness

- The Washington Times

During its coverage of this week’s Islamic terrorist attack in Sydney, Australia, CNN ran a telling banner: “Motivation of suspect unknown.” Motivation unknown? Really?

A Rolling Stone article alleged a gang rape occurred at the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house at the University of Virginia. The magazine has since issued an apology for the article, saying the reporter's trust in her source was misplaced. (Associated Press)

Bogus stories abound in our pathetic press

Will Rogers, the late American humorist and cornpone philosopher, once said, “All I know is what I read in the papers.” That statement earned him a place in “Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations.” Were he alive today, it would most likely be inviting widespread derision. Today’s newspapers abound with bogus stories.

Illustration on Congress' continuing resolution provisions eroding Constitutional liberties by Alexandr Hunter/The Washington Times

President and Congress are heedless to the limits of their power

When the government is waving at us with its right hand, so to speak, it is the government’s left hand that we should be watching. Just as a magician draws your attention to what he wants you to see so you will not observe how his trick is performed, last week presented a textbook example of public disputes masking hidden deceptions. Here is what happened.

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A young boy tosses a football as people walk past a business boarded up to protect against looting in Ferguson, Mo. The unmistakable signs of healing are beginning to dot Ferguson, even the small area of town that has been the center of the world's attention. But those in the community know they've got a long way to go. (Associated Press)

How amnesty, Ferguson are connected

Ferguson has inadvertently drawn the national media spotlight as an epitome of communities across America that are besieged by the effects of constantly loose labor markets where there are far more workers than jobs.

Brown’s bad choices led to death

As a black mother of three young adult sons, I am appalled by the violence, looting and angry behavior of those rioting in Ferguson, Missouri. I sympathize with the family of Michael Brown and am saddened that a mother and father have lost their son.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Great Abraham Lincoln Pocket Watch Conspiracy'

if you share my addiction for forbidden chocolates of the soul, get a copy of "The Great Abraham Lincoln Pocket Watch Conspiracy," settle in by the fire and prepare for a laugh-out-loud return to those thrilling days of yesteryear.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev. speaks with reporters following a closed-door policy meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 2, 2014.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Obama’s petulance spoils a deal for the quacks on the Hill

The noisy quacking of the lame ducks out to despoil the grass on Capitol Hill had convinced most Washington insiders that Congress would dutifully pass what are called "tax extenders" and then go home. "Tax extenders" are legislative provisions providing more than four dozen tax breaks and special treatment to a variety of groups and industries, whose clever lobbyists have always persuaded Congress that the very future of the republic and everyone who lives in it depends on their clients getting special breaks at the expense of everyone else. The wonder is that the republic has lasted so long.

Anvil and Dollar Inflation Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Fed yearns for higher inflation to disguise asset bubbles

Recent statements by Federal Reserve officials would lead just about anyone to believe that one of the bank's central missions has always been to guard against the lurking threat of deflation. They warn that since official inflation has remained below the Fed's 2 percent target for almost two years, the country is liable to fall into a stagnant morass unless the Fed acts boldly to hit its target. It may surprise many that this view is strictly a 21st-century development. The fear (some would say paranoia) regarding sub-2 percent inflation was nowhere in evidence in the past, even when inflation was lower than it is today.

Refugees on the transport Gen. W.C. Langfitt are seen as it docked in New York, July 12, 1955. (AP Photo/Anthony Camerano)

A nation of immigrants built on common sense

"The immigrants watched helplessly as the angry crowd spit out epithets at them, little children clinging to their mothers' skirts for safety. It had been a long, arduous journey, and at the other end, they met nothing but rejection and hatred."

Illustration on Obama's political setback in the 2014 mid-term elections by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

An amnesty plan fit for an emperor, not America

President Obama’s executive order on amnesty is long and complex. Take a speed reading course and here’s what you can find out: nobody goes home unless the president decides you are unworthy of his beneficence.

In this Oct. 20, 2014, file photo, Maryland Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan answers questions during an interview with The Associated Press in Baltimore. Gov.-elect Hogan says he remains committed to pursuing tax relief in his first year as governor, despite a projected budget shortfall of more than a half a billion dollars. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

A bad tax law puts the government in the preaching business

Flawed and cumbersome tax laws afflict taxpayers everywhere, but few are as irksome, as silly and as constitutionally dangerous as Maryland's "stormwater remediation fee," also known as "the rain tax," including whatever penumbras and emanations that followed. Gov.-elect Larry Hogan, a Republican, vowed during his campaign to free taxpayers from the overreaching state law that claims to protect the Chesapeake Bay and other waterways from polluted runoff, flooding and erosion. Together with others, he argues persuasively that it amounts to little more than a weather levy, with accompanying clouds.

People walk away from a storage facility on fire after the announcement of the grand jury decision Monday, Nov. 24, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo. A grand jury has decided not to indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in the death of Michael Brown, the unarmed, black 18-year-old whose fatal shooting sparked sometimes violent protests. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

Ferguson and the useful application of mayhem

For President Obama and his cronies, everything is political and everyone is a pawn. After a grand jury declined to indict Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson in the death of Michael Brown, the White House and Department of Justice immediately pushed the meme that the issue in Ferguson was about racism and policing. While a legitimate issue, in reality it is a symptom of the systemic problem of big-government-sponsored poverty, made worse by the liberal agenda so dear to Mr. Obama himself.

Supporters of immigration reform attend a rally in front of the White House in Washington, Friday, Nov. 21, 2014, thanking President Obama for his executive action on illegal immigration. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Mike McCaul takes on amnesty: 'We will see a wave of illegal immigration'

- The Washington Times

News, turmoil and political distractions are plenty these days. That has not dissuaded Rep. Mike McCaul, Texas Republican and chairman of the House Committee on Homeland Security, from calling a hearing Tuesday to focus on still unanswered questions surrounding President Obama's call for amnesty, and the hair-raising prospect of porous U.S. borders. There to testify about federal response and incoming policy changes: Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson.

Scott Panetti Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When the death penalty is immoral

When Scott Panetti stood in court to defend himself against charges of killing his in-laws, he cut quite a figure. Wearing a purple cowboy costume and bandanna, he showed bizarre behavior in the courtroom. He picked one juror with the flip of a coin. He attempted to subpoena more than 200 witnesses, including John F. Kennedy, the pope and Jesus Christ. He slept through some of the testimony.

Businesses were left in piles of rubble in the aftermath of violence and looting in Ferguson, Missouri, on the night of Nov. 24.    Associated Press photo

Paying a price for their Ferguson mayhem

No matter whose side you are on in the upheaval following the killing of Michael Brown by Police Officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Missouri, everyone should agree on the profound sadness of it all: sadness that an 18-year-old boy-man walked a path that led to his destruction; sadness that a police officer felt the need to defend himself by shooting another human being; sadness over the rioting and looting that followed a grand jury's decision not to indict Officer Wilson; and, for some, sadness that Officer Wilson was not indicted.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: No federal marriage amendment

In advocating Sen. Ted Cruz's proposed amendment to the U.S. Constitution to defend traditional marriage, Gary Bauer notes that amending the Constitution is difficult. ("Considering the thorny question of a marriage amendment," Web, Nov. 20). It is also totally the wrong approach.

Illustration on Eric Holder's exacerbation of problems in Ferguson, Mo. by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The inconvenient heroism of Witness No. 10

From the very first day that news of Michael Brown's shooting death by Officer Darren Wilson hit the front pages, Ferguson, Missouri, became synonymous with police brutality, improper training of officers and a racist, thin blue line.

A lame-duck Congress, Will Rogers once observed, "is like where some fellows worked for you and their work wasn't satisfactory and you let 'em out, but after you fired 'em, you let 'em stay long enough to burn your house down." (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

EDITORAL: Congress, go home

Congress returned from the Thanksgiving holiday stuffed with more than turkey to begin the lame-duck session of the 113th Congress. A lame-duck session is popular only with members who have been retired or fired, eager to inflict one last bruise on the body politic. They have only until next Friday, Dec. 12 — the likely final day of the 113th Congress — to put their marks there. It's the last opportunity for the lame ducks, many more turkey than duck, to help their friends, hurt their enemies and pay back their supporters.

Illustration on the use of static vs. dynamic impact models for government taxation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Rejecting imaginary budget numbers

Would you make an effort to find ways to reduce your tax burden if your tax rate was suddenly raised 50 percent? The higher one's income, the more incentive a person has to find ways to minimize his tax burden — which is why very high tax rates on the rich always fail to produce the projected revenue.