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Illegal Aliens and Illegal Executive Orders Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama has forgotten his official duty is to Americans

Like millions of other Americans, I appreciate the plight of billions of people throughout the world who would like nothing more than to find themselves in the United States, where they could enjoy a much higher standard of living and wonderful opportunities for advancement. It should first be considered, however, that we have millions of people already mired in dire poverty.

Illustration on the negative impact of Obama's immigration action on black Americans by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Black voters for Obama get nothing but disrespect

- The Washington Times

President Obama discounted November’s election results because turnout is lower in midterm than in presidential elections, but there is reason to believe that his treatment of his base contributed to the decision of many Democrats to not bother going to the polls in what everyone recognized as a crucial election.

Ghost Town Soldier Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Europe’s sentinels have gone home

Josef Stalin, when asked in 1935 whether he could do anything with Russian Catholics to help win favor with the pope against the increasing Nazi threat, famously responded: “How many divisions has he got?”

Illustration on Middle East violence by Julius/Horsens Folkeblad, Horsens, Denmark

Slaughter in the synagogue

Executioners for the Islamic State use knives to cut the throats of Christians, Yazidis and “apostate” Muslims. Palestinian executioners last week used knives and a meat cleaver to slaughter Jewish worshippers at a synagogue in West Jerusalem.

FILE - In this Nov. 28, 2013, file photo, a giant Uncle Sam balloon is marched down Sixth Avenue during the 87th Annual Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York. Helium makes the huge balloons in the parade sail high above the crowd. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)

The covetousness crisis

The devastating effects of America’s covet-driven culture.

Illustration on the removal of Chuck Hagel by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Dumping Hagel at Defense

The abrupt resignation of Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has a few important facts behind it, but it is probably tied to a shift in President Obama’s strategy in Afghanistan.

President Barack Obama, left, reaches over to touch Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, left, following an announcement of Hagel's resignation during an event in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, Monday, Nov. 24, 2014. Hagel is stepping down under pressure from Obama's Cabinet, senior administration officials said Monday, following a tenure in which he has struggled to break through the White House's insular foreign policy team. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

What Hagel’s exit means

Chuck Hagel’s decision signified only one thing: Barack Obama no longer enjoys the confidence of the American military establishment.

Congress Wields the Budget Ax Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Restoring regular order on Capitol Hill

So long as they do not overplay their hand, Republicans in the U.S. House and Senate have been given a wonderful opportunity to significantly pare the federal budget and shape U.S. policy in the last two years of the Obama administration.

Illustration on the effects of Obama's illegal alien order on the African American population by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How about putting Americans first?

The framers of the Constitution sought to limit the power of government and expand individual liberty. President Obama sees it the other way. Whether he violated the constitutional limits of his power will be debated and possibly decided in the courts and by the new Republican majority in Congress, but there is another issue surrounding the amnesty order that needs addressing.

Illustration on further Union intrusion on McDonald's and other franchises by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Going overboard at the labor board

Whom do you work for? Such a simple question should not require a government agency to give an answer. However, the Obama administration, in its never-ending quest for power over individuals and businesses, has decided that it — rather than you or your employer — should determine whom you work for.

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Illustration on The Economist's recent apologetic issue for Iran by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Economist misjudges Iran

"The revolution is over." When journalists at The Economist, one of the world's most influential publications, run that headline on a cover story, "a special report" on the "new Iran," you assume they have solid evidence to support their thesis.

Illustration on the new faces of the Republican party by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The 'New Black' moves right

Last week's midterm elections were a huge success for the Republicans. Significant gains were made in the governorships and House of Representatives. The GOP also took control of the Senate for the first time since 2007.

Illustration on the continued weak job economy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

New jobs numbers, same poor economy

Last month's new job figures, despite the news media's exaggerated response, fell well below the numbers needed to put America back to work.

FILE - In this undated file photo released by Forest Guardians, a prairie dog eats in southwestern Utah. Cedar City residents who say prairie dogs are overrunning parts of their town are set to argue Thursday, Sept. 11, 2014 against federal regulations protecting the animals. Residents suing in federal court say the prairie dogs have done damage to the city's golf course, airport and at the cemetery, even interrupting funerals with their barking. (AP Photo/Forest Guardians, File)

EDITORIAL: Dogging it on the prairie

Prairie dogs, with more important things to do, don't engage in interstate commerce. That was the finding of a federal judge last week in a decision that could unravel the Endangered Species Act and restore a little respect for private property.

BOOK REVIEW: 'U.S. Marshals'

On Sept. 24, the U.S. Marshals Service celebrated its 225th anniversary, making them the country's oldest law enforcement agency — and, according to Mike Earp, being a deputy U.S. marshal is one of the most dangerous jobs in law enforcement.

On Sept. 11, 2001, the twin towers of the World Trade Center burn and later collapse after hijacked planes deliberately crashed into them in New York City. A multimillion-dollar reward was offered for now-dead terrorist Osama bin Laden after the attacks.

Wean business insurers off Terrorism Risk Insurance Act

The threat posed by radical Islam once again commands the nation's attention at the same time Congress debates whether to re-extend a never-used terrorism-risk insurance program that was supposed to expire nine years ago.