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Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton gives an acceptance speech after accepting the Trailblazer Award during the LGBT Community Center Dinner at Cipriani Wall Street on Thursday, April 20, 2017, in New York. (AP Photo/Kevin Hagen) ** FILE **

The Democratic Party’s ‘Gong Show’

Finally, the Democrats admit it wasn’t the Russians, James B. Comey or sexism that brought Hillary Clinton down. We are now told by journalists, leading Democrats, and even a former Democratic presidential candidate, that it was the inept dysfunction of the party itself, Hillary, and her abused and frightened team that has reduced them all to irrelevant, vapid political busybodies.

FILE - In this March 18, 2017 file photo, Congressional candidate Rob Quist meets with supporters during the annual Mansfield Metcalf Celebration dinner hosted by the state's Democratic Party in Helena, Montana. He is trying to fire up the party faithful in his race against Republican Greg Gianforte in a May 25 special election to fill Montana's sole congressional seat. (AP Photo/Bobby Caina Calvan, File)

Hiding his socialism beneath a cowboy hat

- The Washington Times

Fresh from special election defeats in Kansas and Georgia, Democratic professionals and activists alike are focusing on the election to fill Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s Montana congressional seat as one more chance to chip away at the Republican majority in the House.

Afghanistan Peace Plan Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Resolving the Afghanistan crisis

The U.S.-led war in Afghanistan has not only continued unabated for over 15 years, making it America’s longest war, but has no end in sight.

In this April 25, 2017 photo provided by ABC 7 Eyewitness News in New York, a wooden hammock lay on the sidewalk in New York. Police say that an tourist from England was injured and taken to the hospital when the hammock fell from the building she was talking near and struck her. Police believe wind may have blown the wooden framed hammock off the building's terrace. (ABC 7 Eyewitness News via AP)

Taking the cuffs off the cops

The Obama Justice Department made a habit of federalizing local police forces by threatening litigation and securing a settlement in the form of a consent decree. That turned out to be an exercise in anti-police bias which, happily, Attorney General Jeff Sessions is now reversing.

Marine Le Pen (Associated Press)

The status quo survives in France, but in ruins

- The Washington Times

The French easily embrace contradiction and chaos. It’s what makes their politics work: “Plus ca change, plus c’est la meme chose,” and they said it first: “The more things change, the more they stay the same.” The Sunday national election in France proved it again.

Unrest in Venezuela Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Venezuela’s coming civil war

- The Washington Times

As American public attention has been focusing on terror attacks in Paris, the crisis in Syria and the nuclear-armed lunatic running North Korea, Venezuela to our south is about to explode into violence and civil war with incalculable consequences in our own hemisphere.

Ivanka Trump, listens as her father President Donald Trump, talks via a video conference to astronauts on the International Space Station, Monday, April 24, 2017, from the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

100 days of the GOP eating its own

- The Washington Times

It’s rounding on 100 days of the President Donald Trump administration — and surprise, surprise, it’s not just Democrats who are pointing wild fingers at the White House for this and that, for what have you and what not. criticizing, condemning and generally crying about how things are progressing. It’s Republicans, almost as much.

Illustration on the consequences of questioning current conventional wisdom by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Shut up and go away

Columbia University, from which I have a degree, has set aside rooms where straight white males — like me — are told they are unwelcome. How should I respond to their annual fund drives?

Illustration on the recent Paris terror attack and the French national elections by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The police vs. the PC police

As is almost always the case, signs of trouble preceded the latest shooting in Paris, which left one police officer dead and wounded two bystanders before police killed the gunman, later identified as French national Karim Cheurfi, a known criminal with a long, violent record. ISIS claimed to be behind the attack. According to police, a note praising ISIS fell out of Cheurfi’s pocket when he fell.

Better-educated Immigrants Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

One-upping Donald Trump’s crackdown on immigration

President Trump’s crackdown on immigrants committing crimes and employers abusing H-1B visas to replace qualified Americans with low-wage foreign workers may be welcome. However, those fall far short of the comprehensive reform needed to better align immigration policy with the needs of the country.

FILE - In this March 22, 2017, file photo, Antonio Reyes of Brownsville, Texas, stands by the U.S.-Mexico border fence near his home. Reyes said he's seen people scale the border fence that bisects his backyard and jump down in seconds. Sometimes they carry bales of what appear to be drugs. A higher wall is "still not going to stop them," he said. "They'll shotput it or whatever they have to do." (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)

Protecting our southern border with U.S. mariners

As chairman of the Coast Guard and Maritime Subcommittee in the House of Representatives, I am proud to be an unwavering defender of the Jones Act — a critical U.S. national security law that requires vessels moving from one U.S. port to another must be U.S.-built and U.S.-crewed.

Related Articles

People watch a TV news program showing a file image of the USS Carl Vinson aircraft carrier at Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, April 12, 2017. North Korea's parliament convened Tuesday amid heightened tensions on the divided peninsula, with the United States and South Korea conducting their biggest-ever military exercises and the USS Carl Vinson aircraft carrier heading to the area in a show of American strength. The signs read "The USS Carl Vinson aircraft carrier changes route". (AP Photo/Ahn Yooung-joon)

Calculating the threat from North Korea

"The land of the morning calm" is anything but that. The ancient Korean name for the divided peninsula is belied by the tension simmering for nearly 70 years, enlivened with frequent bursts of cross-border invective and sometimes violence.

Illegals' crime rate 100 percent

This week Attorney General Jeff Sessions directed 94 U.S. attorneys to enforce human-smuggling laws, as well as identity-theft-related and Social-Security-related fraud. (The chief actuary of the Social Security Administration has said that some 75 percent of working illegal aliens use false Social Security numbers).

People with Asian community organizations from Chicago hold signs to protest after Sunday's confrontation where David Dao, 69, of Elizabethtown, Ky., was removed from a United Airlines airplane by Chicago airport police at O'Hare International Airport, during rally near United's counter at the airport's Terminal 1 in Chicago on Tuesday, April 11, 2017. (Chris Sweda/Chicago Tribune via AP)

United's passenger flap sparks foreign fury

- The Washington Times

United Airlines, already under the gun from angry social media posters who saw its security-guard ousting of a passenger as an uncalled-for manhandling, is now facing fury from Vietnam. Why? Turns out, the guy who was dragged down the aisle, David Dao, was not from China, as initially assumed.

Hillary Clinton will be honored with Planned Parenthood's "Champion of the Century Award" at an event in New York City on May 2, 2017. (Twitter, Planned Parenthood) ** FILE **

Hillary Clinton's revenge tour and Nikki Haley's ascent

Hillary Clinton has emerged from the woods determining that her election loss is everyone's fault but her own. But even more surprising was that Donald Trump colluding with the Russians was suddenly no longer the main culprit; no, now it was hatred of women that fueled her loss. But this was no ordinary misogyny, it was the fault of women in particular who apparently hate other women. Or something.

Illustration on tax time by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Tortuous tales of 1040 taxes

If you're about to spend some eight to 22 hours to prepare your federal income tax Form 1040 (that's the range the Internal Revenue Service and experts estimate) before the April 18 deadline, well, good luck. Remember what genius Albert Einstein said: "The hardest thing in the world to understand is the income tax." And if you need more solace from the past to sustain you in the task, here's a smorgasbord of famous and not-so-famous insights.

Illustration on stopping anti-Semitism by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Stopping anti-Semitic bigotry

Historically, Americans' response to hate speech has been more speech. The focus has been on defeating bigotry in the marketplace of ideas and to leave government out of the struggle. This model has guided the approaches of the Simon Wiesenthal Center, the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) and other human and civil rights nongovernmental organizations.

Illustration on President Trump's non-ideological motives for acting in Syria by Alexandr Hunter/The Washington Times

A non-ideological president

It looks like former Obama administration National Security Adviser Susan Rice will get a reprieve. With all the hullabaloo from last week's military action by President Trump in Syria's -- do we call it Syria's civil war or a massacre? -- it now appears Ms. Rice's mishandling of surveillance is going to subside from the headlines temporarily. Well, her mishandling of surveillance on the Trump team can wait. What Mr. Trump did last week in public was historic. He changed his mind.

Illustration on the questions over further action in Syria by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A sudden Syrian stumbling block

Up until about a week ago, we saw the beginnings of the new "America First" approach to national security that Donald Trump had promised during the campaign and which had helped win him the presidency. In Syria, cooperation with Russia had begun to target the Islamic State, al Qaeda, and other embodiments of "radical Islamic terrorism," which President Trump has sworn to destroy.

Revisionist History in Lithuania Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Surmounting Lithuania's Holocaust past

Since its independence from the Soviet Union, an arduous and painful process in itself, Lithuania has gone to great lengths to take its place among the democracies of Europe. Securing both NATO and European Union membership are included in the tangible acts the nation has taken on the road to obtaining its place in the current world order.

Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch listens as President Donald Trump speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House White House in Washington, Monday, April 10, 2017, before a public swearing-in ceremony for Gorsuch. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

A moral victory, but a strategic defeat

With Neil Gorsuch's nomination for the Supreme Court, liberals accepted moral victory in exchange for strategic defeat. They forced a fight they could not win and thereby surrendered a better chance of victory later. In contrast to limited rewards from moral victories, liberals will discover that returns on strategic defeats are anything but limited.

Dawning of the 'Age of Aquariums'

You can see it in aquariums. Anyone who has kept tropical fish knows that in a large, "mixed" tank where several varieties are thrown together, the newly "integrated" fish tend to resegregate as quickly as possible and as thoroughly as space and opportunity permit. Zebra fish hang out with other zebra fish, guppies cluster with fellow guppies, bottom feeders continue to feed on the bottom and "kissing gouramis" only kiss each other.

Trump like all the rest

Donald Trump promised us prosperity and security, but now has us on the brink of war with Russia, China, North Korea and Iran. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson claims that the United States is ready to use its military to punish any massacre of civilians anywhere in the world. The U.S. military recently killed more than 200 civilians in a bombing raid on Iraq March 17, which is approximately twice the number of people killed by the April 4 Syrian airstrike. President Trump suspects the attack in Syria was chemical, but it may have been a toxic gas cloud created by the destruction of a chemical-weapons manufacturing facility controlled by rebel forces. There is no hard proof that Syrian leader Bashar Assad is responsible for using chemical weapons.

Seek charges against Syria, Russia

The Russians are very advanced in their ability to wage war in nuclear, biological and chemical environments. The Syrian air force likely possesses similar capabilities, possibly in older, Soviet versions. Substantial decontamination facilities are probably present near the chemical-weapons storage areas, as well as the flight line.

FILE - In this July 8, 2015, file photo, United Airlines and United Express planes prepare to takeoff at George Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston. After a man is dragged off a United Express flight on Sunday, April 9, 2017, United Airlines becomes the butt of jokes online and on late-night TV. Travel and public-relations experts say United has fumbled the situation from the start, but its impossible to know if the damage is temporary or lasting. Air travelers are drawn to the cheapest price no matter the name on the plane. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, FIle)

The unfriendly skies

One man's misery can be another man's meat, and business-school students looking for a lesson in how not to turn a manageable crisis into an uncontrolled public-relations catastrophe will owe United Airlines a debt for years to come.

FILE - In this April 22, 2015 file photo, a member of the Baltimore Police Department stands guard outside of the department's Western District police station as men hold their hands up in protest during a march for Freddie Gray in Baltimore. In a city that became emblematic of police abuse, excessive force and callous treatment of young black men, Baltimore's mayor and commissioner say they are eager and ready to change not only the culture of law enforcement, but the practice. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

The violent legacy of Freddie Gray

Healing is preferable to hurting but much harder to achieve. That's the lesson in Baltimore two years after the death of Freddie Gray, whose death in police custody set off riots and mayhem. Faced with a choice between escalating crime and aggressive policing, the city has spurned the advice of the Trump administration and stuck with a strategy that promises more pain and heartbreak.