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Foreign Minister Sebastian Kurz, head of Austrian People's Party, smiles in Vienna, Austria, Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017, after the closing of the polling stations for the Austrian national elections. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader) ** FILE **

An Austrian thumb in the eye of the elites

- The Washington Times

The elites everywhere are having a hard time. When the peasants no longer salute, tug a forelock and obey with a whimper, even if with a snarl and a whine, you know you’ve lost your mojo.

Chart to accompany Rahn article of Oct. 17, 2017.

Schooling the U.S. on economic freedom

Once again, there is more evidence that economic freedom leads to success. Many of the former communist countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union have made enormous economic progress from the time they became free almost three decades ago.

Pope Francis acknowledges the applause of the audience after he delivered his speech during the visit to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) on the occasion of the World Food Day, Monday, Oct. 16, 2017.(AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

Pope Francis, biblically challenged, blames climate change — again

- The Washington Times

Once again, Pope Francis has pressed forward the mantra that much of the world’s problems — hunger, overrun borders — are due to man’s failures to stop wars and address climate change. This is odd, given a more biblical perspective might say, oh let’s see, wars come from evil desires and hunger, in large part, from wars.

Illustration on Richard Nixon's role in the Vietnam War by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A faulty retelling of ‘The Vietnam War’

When Richard Nixon was in the White House, I was in Vietnam and he was my commander in chief. When I was on Ronald Reagan’s National Security Council staff, I had the opportunity to brief former President Nixon on numerous occasions and came to admire his analysis of current events, insights on world affairs and compassion for our troops. His preparation for any meeting or discussion was exhaustive. His thirst for information was unquenchable and his tolerance for fools was nonexistent.

Illustration on China's designs on the electric car market by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The race for electric vehicle dominance

General Motors and Ford are scurrying to realign for what many believe are the next big things — driverless and electric vehicles (EVs) — but don’t look to Detroit, Japan or Germany for the mighty impulse that transforms personal transportation. With the world’s largest car market and savvy government policies, the advantage goes to China.

Illustration on NATO' difficult situation with member nation Turkey by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Saving NATO from Turkey

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization, known as NATO, faces an existential problem.

Vice President Mike Pence speaks on behalf of Virginia Republican gubernatorial candidate Ed Gillespie during a campaign rally at the Washington County Fairgrounds Saturday, Oct. 14, 2017, in Abingdon, Va. Establishment figure Gillespie is in a neck-and-neck race against Democratic Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam. (Andre Teague/The Bristol Herald-Courier via AP)

Trump heads, Pence tails

If a metaphor could be used for this White House, it might be a two-sided coin with President Trump as heads and Vice President Mike Pence as tails.

A Game of Political Football Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A Republican team with no offense

Is the Republican Party in trouble? The primary fight defeat in Alabama and the quick retirement signal by Sen. Bob Corker are not the only straws in the wind. Current polling shows Republicans trail Democrats by 8 percentage points in a generic 2018 House race.

President Donald Trump boards Air Force One, Monday, Oct. 16, 2017, in Andrews Air Force Base, Md., en route Greenville, S.C., for a fundraiser for South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Toward a better nuclear deal with Iran

To hear President Trump’s political opponents describe it, the decision to decertify the Iran Deal is a major miscalculation — a needlessly provocative action that could even bring all-out war.

While early voting may seem more convenient, it actually decreases turnout. (Associated Press/File)

Early voting disadvantages seem to outweigh benefits

Early voting — opening a limited number of locations where people can cast their ballots prior to Election Day — is a “reform” that states should reconsider. Its disadvantages seem to outweigh its benefits.

Illustration on pro-active measures for protecting American cybersecurity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Russia’s aggressive cyberwar

Russian President Vladimir Putin’s regime has been highly aggressive in pursuing cyberwar and cyberespionage at least since its 2007 attacks on the Estonian government. The fact that it is routinely attacking U.S. defense and intelligence cyber-networks can be no surprise.

Illustration on the history leading up the North Korean nuclear crisis by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How we got to a nuclear North Korea

President Trump and his Cabinet have said repeatedly that the present state of affairs with North Korea represents 25 years of American foreign policy failure going back over at least three presidents — Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Barack Obama. Reviewing this disaster, there are at least three major mileposts.

American Intellectual Property Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A better deal with NAFTA 2.0

America’s trade negotiators are now in the process of crafting a 2.0 update of the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Fortunately, it now appears that Donald Trump’s intention on NAFTA is to mend it, not end it. The trade deal has been a stunning economic success for all three nations: Canada, Mexico and the United States. Freer trade has meant steady increases in the volume of trade, greater competitiveness and lower prices.

Related Articles

Illustration on rebuilding Pueto Rico's economic structures by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Drawing opportunity from disaster

The disastrous hurricanes that struck Puerto Rico might provide the excuse for the necessary, fundamental reform on the island. Puerto Rico has spent most of the past 12 years in recession, leading to its current bankruptcy.

Illustration on the legal racket in California surrounding coffee by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Taking a bite out of Big Coffee

An ominous cancer warning may soon accompany every Frappuccino, cold brew and coffee bean sold in California.

A home stands damaged in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, in the Montones Cuatro, Sector Piedrazul of Las Piedras in Puerto Rico, Monday, Oct. 2, 2017. Power is still cut off on most of the island, schools and many businesses are closed and much of the countryside is struggling to find fresh water and food. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

How to speed the rebuilding of Puerto Rico

To say that our fellow citizens in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands are suffering is a vast understatement. The combined punches of Hurricanes Irma and Maria have devastated the island territories.

Productive North Carolina Tax Cuts Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A state model for federal tax relief

As our congressional Republicans begin to shape their tax relief for hardworking Americans, they need not look any further than North Carolina. In the years after rolling out a bold tax relief plan that helps nearly all North Carolinians, the Old North State has become a bellwether model of how to cut taxes.

Illustration on not comparing Trump to Reagan by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why Trump is no Reagan

The looming congressional battle over the Republicans' big tax-overhaul plan is likely to accentuate a fundamental political reality of our time, which can be distilled into three sentences: The American polity has become politically dysfunctional. President Trump was elected to rectify the dysfunction. He doesn't know how do it.

Smoothing the flow of Midwestern commerce

Drivers describe traffic conditions on the Brent Spence Bridge that spans the Ohio River between Covington, Ky., and Cincinnati, Ohio as a "bottleneck," a "choke point," a "source of gridlock" and a variety of other less printable names.

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump walk from the White House in Washington, Monday, Oct. 2, 2017, to the South Lawn for a moment of silence to remember the victims of the mass shooting in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Reflections in a conservative battle cry

Americans who like to invoke President Ronald Reagan should be reminded of his words about the need for agreement, now more than ever. "The person who agrees with you 80 percent of the time is a friend and an ally -- not a 20 percent traitor."

Uncovering and defeating 'cyber jihad'

Terrorists and their extremist adherents are adept at utilizing the internet, particularly social media platforms, which have become widely accessible globally, and in multiple languages.

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump stand with vice president Mike Pence and his wife Karen during a moment of silence to remember the victims of the mass shooting in Las Vegas, on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Monday, Oct. 2, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

A nation grieves again

We live in a monstrous time, with evil lying in wait to pounce upon the innocent and the unwary. The size and scope of the expressions of such evil, as at the massacre of dozens of men and women at the Mandalay Bay Hotel in Las Vegas on Sunday night, overwhelms the ability of the language to describe it.

No more subsidizing disloyalty

Perhaps it is time for everyone on welfare, the staff of every college that teaches anti-American courses, the players and owners of sports franchises that receive federal funds, and illegal aliens who receive benefits to be made to take an oath of loyalty to the people, flag and Constitution of the United States before receiving said funds.

Puerto Rico leaders derelict

There is something seriously wrong with politicians who have the audacity to blame President Trump for not acting fast enough in the aftermath of the two hurricanes that hit Puerto Rico.

First lady 'racism' hypocrisy

A Kansas teacher was fired over racist comments about the Obamas. A Georgia teacher was fired for racist comment about Michelle Obama. Liz Phipps Soeiro, the Massachusetts elementary school librarian, got a slap on the wrist for her rants about first lady Melania Trump's White House gift of Dr. Seuss books ("Elementary school librarian rejects books donated by Melania Trump." Web, Sept. 28).

Bills are going before the Senate to effectively block President Trump from dismissing special counsel Robert Mueller from his investigations into election meddling. (Associated Press)

The clock pursues Robert Mueller

Robert Mueller is nothing if not relentless. Impatient with a fishing expedition that relies on slippery prey to swim into his net, the special counsel now dreams of besieging anyone at the White House who has so much as watched an episode of a television drama about Soviet spies in Washington. Scalps have to be taken because that's what special counsels, i.e., special prosecutors, do.

Refugee number deserves more than president's 'consultation' from Congress

President Trump last week announced that he will limit the number of refugees allowed to enter the U.S. in fiscal 2018 to 45,000. This is huge swing from President Obama's "refugee cap" of 110,000 for the current fiscal year -- a cap that was subsequently lowered to 50,000 by the Trump administration.