Skip to content

Happening Now

Help a military member win a laptop this Christmas

Opinion

Featured Articles

Obama’s futile overtures to Cuba

President Obama’s argument for unilaterally reversing U.S.-Cuba policy rests on the false premise that engagement with dictators and terrorists will somehow get them to change their ways.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton has a laugh in Boston in this Dec. 4, 2014, file photo. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)

Hillary Clinton’s jaded sense of justice

The Benghazi massacre most certainly deserves to be a subject Hillary Rodham Clinton should be held accountable for and never allowed to forget. Yet there is another, even more recklessly dangerous thing that will affect Mrs. Clinton’s designs on the White House: her attitude in general toward America’s enemies.

Illustration on Obama's new policy toward Cuba by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Koch brothers bad, Castro brothers Boy Scouts

Liberals were in a near euphoric state on Wednesday after President Obama announced that the United States and Cuba are on a path to normalizing relations between the two nations, a move that will pave the way for a U.S. Embassy in Havana, and may eventually lead to lifting a 50-year-old American trade embargo.

In this Wednesday, Oct. 8, 2014, photo, American flags fly in front of the New York Stock Exchange, in New York. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan) ** FILE **

Recalling what is right about America

Everywhere, we suddenly hear words of division, difference, recrimination. Suddenly, America is Ferguson, Missouri writ large. But are we? Are we not still Americans, first?

Illustration on the damage being done by Obamacare by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Obamacare’s Christmas surprise

Get ready for the largely underreported rule that will allow CMS to change Americans’ health plans without their knowledge.

In this Dec. 17, 2014, file photo, a poster for the movie "The Interview" is carried away by a worker after being pulled from a display case at a Carmike Cinemas movie theater in Atlanta. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

Hollywood cowers at this laff riot over ‘The Interview’

- The Washington Times

Movies may not be better than ever, as a Hollywood marketing slogan in yesteryear boasted they were, but the critics take movies seriously in North Korea. The chief movie critic in Pyongyang can kill a movie with a single review. He might even kill anybody who goes to see it.

Illustration on steps needed to protect U.S. intellectual property by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Lessons from the Sony hack attack

The hacking attack of Sony Corp. and the compromising of its intellectual property should send a wake-up call to American business. If Sony can be hacked, so too can our companies that make defense technologies. This attack reveals that the very innovations that give us our competitive edge in the world, both commercially and strategically, are gravely at risk.

Illustration on continued access to Juvenile criminal records by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Allowing access to juveniles’ records hurts their chances of going straight

By incapacitating violent and dangerous offenders, incarceration can promote public safety. But a point of diminishing returns is reached as prisons sweep in more and more nonviolent, low-risk offenders. These circumstances are even more alarming when you look at the juvenile justice system and consider that 95 percent of youths in this system have committed nonviolent offenses, including some that weren’t even a crime when many of us were kids.

Illustration on Obama's normalization policy towards Cuba by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama adds Cuba to his list of sellouts

President Obama continues to embrace low-tier, go-it-alone executive actions to pad the last two years of his mistake-filled, empty-agenda presidency in a hopeless hunt for a legacy. His arrogant decision this week to re-establish diplomatic relations with communist Cuba is the latest example of a president desperately searching for something do without having to deal with Congress.

Illustration on the need to identify Islamic terrorism for what it is by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Suicide by political correctness

- The Washington Times

During its coverage of this week’s Islamic terrorist attack in Sydney, Australia, CNN ran a telling banner: “Motivation of suspect unknown.” Motivation unknown? Really?

Related Articles

Illustration on the American Christmas tradition by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ignoring the Christmas haters

Alas, it is over. I am speaking of the Thanksgiving Day celebration — one of my favorite holidays. It is a serious celebration as we give thanks for our many blessings. Yet it is also a jolly day, full of good food, drink and sport, perhaps touch football, more likely a televised game. The whole family comes together and, often in the company of friends, has a festive time. Moreover, there is a venerable sense of tradition to the feast that renders the whole holiday somehow reassuring.

Illustration on issues raised by Ferguson by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Racial sensitivity and militarization of police make an explosive brew

The city of Ferguson, Missouri, is now burned into our consciousness in a way that few other places are. In my youth, the race riots in Newark, Detroit and Los Angeles marked turning points in my own and in the public's awareness of the problems of a black underclass that perceives itself as being so unfairly governed by a white power structure that it resorts to violence.

Brown’s bad choices led to death

As a black mother of three young adult sons, I am appalled by the violence, looting and angry behavior of those rioting in Ferguson, Missouri. I sympathize with the family of Michael Brown and am saddened that a mother and father have lost their son.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev. speaks with reporters following a closed-door policy meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 2, 2014.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Obama’s petulance spoils a deal for the quacks on the Hill

The noisy quacking of the lame ducks out to despoil the grass on Capitol Hill had convinced most Washington insiders that Congress would dutifully pass what are called "tax extenders" and then go home. "Tax extenders" are legislative provisions providing more than four dozen tax breaks and special treatment to a variety of groups and industries, whose clever lobbyists have always persuaded Congress that the very future of the republic and everyone who lives in it depends on their clients getting special breaks at the expense of everyone else. The wonder is that the republic has lasted so long.

Refugees on the transport Gen. W.C. Langfitt are seen as it docked in New York, July 12, 1955. (AP Photo/Anthony Camerano)

A nation of immigrants built on common sense

"The immigrants watched helplessly as the angry crowd spit out epithets at them, little children clinging to their mothers' skirts for safety. It had been a long, arduous journey, and at the other end, they met nothing but rejection and hatred."

Illustration on Obama's political setback in the 2014 mid-term elections by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

An amnesty plan fit for an emperor, not America

President Obama’s executive order on amnesty is long and complex. Take a speed reading course and here’s what you can find out: nobody goes home unless the president decides you are unworthy of his beneficence.

In this Oct. 20, 2014, file photo, Maryland Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan answers questions during an interview with The Associated Press in Baltimore. Gov.-elect Hogan says he remains committed to pursuing tax relief in his first year as governor, despite a projected budget shortfall of more than a half a billion dollars. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

A bad tax law puts the government in the preaching business

Flawed and cumbersome tax laws afflict taxpayers everywhere, but few are as irksome, as silly and as constitutionally dangerous as Maryland's "stormwater remediation fee," also known as "the rain tax," including whatever penumbras and emanations that followed. Gov.-elect Larry Hogan, a Republican, vowed during his campaign to free taxpayers from the overreaching state law that claims to protect the Chesapeake Bay and other waterways from polluted runoff, flooding and erosion. Together with others, he argues persuasively that it amounts to little more than a weather levy, with accompanying clouds.

Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Ferguson destroyed itself at the urging of cruel-hearted outsiders

What is difficult to understand is the benefit that the Ferguson, Missouri, community derives from burning and looting business establishments in their own neighborhoods, especially when unemployment is already a problem. In the meantime, the outside agitators in many cases are sitting in their hotel rooms sipping wine and watching the carnage on television.

Iranian Aggression in Mideast Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Delaying a nuclear deal advances Iran’s goal of hegemony with a Shiite crescent

Nov. 24 loomed as a strategic date in the history of the globe. Since the P5 plus 1 nations decided a deal with Iran could not be reached, though, history has been delayed seven months. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel, among others, has said "no deal is better than a bad deal," but it appears as if the Obama administration and the P5 plus 1 group are seeking any deal rather than no deal.

Illustration on Democrats' difficulties with Obama by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

Democrats to Obama: The party’s over

It turns out there is more infighting among Democrats and the White House over a host of issues than there is in the Republican ranks. Sen. Charles E. Schumer lifted the lid on the behind-the-scenes, postelection bickering and discord that now divides his party.

Anvil and Dollar Inflation Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Fed yearns for higher inflation to disguise asset bubbles

Recent statements by Federal Reserve officials would lead just about anyone to believe that one of the bank's central missions has always been to guard against the lurking threat of deflation. They warn that since official inflation has remained below the Fed's 2 percent target for almost two years, the country is liable to fall into a stagnant morass unless the Fed acts boldly to hit its target. It may surprise many that this view is strictly a 21st-century development. The fear (some would say paranoia) regarding sub-2 percent inflation was nowhere in evidence in the past, even when inflation was lower than it is today.