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President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting on domestic and international human trafficking, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. With Trump are Michelle DeLaune, center, National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, and Dina Powell, right, White House Senior Counselor for Economic Initiatives. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Trumpspeak, a language rich in adjectives

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump isn’t the carrier of the disease that threatens the language, but he suffers with enthusiasm. His abuse of the adjective might eventually threaten his foreign policy.

Illustration on immigration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘I am an immigrant’

I have a Masters in International Relations, speak four languages and served as a politician in my country, the Republic of Georgia. I am also an immigrant.

Playing the xenophobic card

- The Washington Times

Last week, The New York Times detailed President Donald Trump’s press conference, and wrote: “A Jewish reporter got to ask Trump a question, it didn’t go well.”

The Genesis of Despicable Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Being a ‘deplorable’

Who among us can’t at some point relate to what it feels like to be an “irredeemable deplorable,” a term coined in the heat of a campaign but with far greater implications now. Whether we are religious or not, whether we pray or not, whether we are political activists or not, many of us know what it feels like to be mocked to the point of less than “other” status.

Illustration of Ajit Pai by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A new champion for internet choice

One of President Trump’s less publicized appointments also happens to be one of his best: Ajit Pai as the new chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is a cause for celebration.

Illustration on the 9th Circuit court by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Reining in a hysterical judiciary

On Feb. 9, a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit issued a ruling upholding the temporary restraining order against enforcement of President Trump’s Executive Order 13769.

Illustration on the complexities of dealing with illegal immigration by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The labyrinth of illegal immigration

Activists portray illegal immigration solely as a human story of the desperately poor from south of the border fleeing misery to start new, productive lives in the United States — despite exploitation and America’s nativist immigration laws.

Black Leadership Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Enlightened, inspired black leadership

After having been assigned to the United States Military Academy at West Point, one becomes acutely aware of the critical role leadership plays in solving challenging social problems. As an African-American, with that experience, I cannot not but consider the role black leadership plays in addressing African-American issues.

Illustration on domestic spying by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

The spooks have come home to roost

Last week, The Wall Street Journal revealed that members of the intelligence community — part of the deep state, the unseen government within the government that does not change with elections — now have acquired so much data on everyone in America that they can selectively reveal it to reward their friends and harm their foes. Their principal foe today is the president of the United States.

The Annual Academy Liberal Awards Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How not to embarrass Oscar

When you give your acceptance speeches, thank your publicist, limo driver, manicurist, masseuse, day nanny, night nanny and weekend nanny. Your attorney Marty Singer for killing that salacious National Enquirer story.

Illustration on the need to clean house at U.S. intelligence agencies by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Rousting the anti-Flynn cabal

In the anti-Trump media war, it is nearly impossible to keep the names straight without a scorecard. Barely had Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn’s name faded from the news cycle than he was replaced by H.R. McMaster, another lieutenant general most Americans have never heard of. Will this latest general be any more fortunate than his predecessor? Only if he can overcome the frenzied machinations of the Obama deep state.

President Donald Trump, right, speaks as Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, left, listens at Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Fla., Monday, Feb. 20, 2017, where Trump announced that McMaster will be the new national security adviser. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

The downside of a Trump tariff

When word got out in January 1848 that gold had been discovered at Sutter’s Mill in Coloma, California, near Sacramento, it triggered the famous California Gold Rush, which in a few short years brought some 300,000 fortune seekers to the territory, whose population at the time was just 155,000, most of them Native Americans.

Attack on the Earth by the Evil Empire Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Time’s misreading of science

As demonstrated by the confirmation hearings of Scott Pruitt for new Environmental Protection Agency chief, all-out war is being waged against the Trump administration by leftists who believe science is under attack from the evil empire.

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Illustration on Trump's cabinet members' successes by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Speaking Trump's truth to power

Donald Trump is the carnival barker with a megaphone and the loudest voice on the midway, shilling for "the greatest show on earth." He's the used-car salesman pushing a battered Buick with manifold sins within covered over with a few coats of slick new paint.

The libertarians versus the conservatives

While libertarians and conservatives have some similar outlooks on politics, economics and culture, many profound differences have kept them apart. Attempts to bridge this gap, including Frank S. Meyer's theory of fusionism (combining elements of libertarianism and traditional conservatism), have largely been unsuccessful.

Climate change, not tax, real burden

Thank you for reporting on the carbon dividends plan released by Republican elder statesmen and the Climate Leadership Council. According to the article, "Republican leaders on Capitol Hill and their anti-tax allies are moving quickly to crush conservative proposals for a carbon tax before they even have time to breathe" ("Republicans move to block conservative proposals for carbon tax," Web, Feb. 19).

Media trying to toss Trump

The media in South Africa did the same thing to President F.W. DeKlerk that the U.S. media is doing to Donald Trump today. It was done to remove Mr. DeKlerk from power and establish the communist Nelson Mandela. Under Mr. DeKlerk, a world-renowned capitalist, the people were prosperous and happy. Under Mr. Mandela they suffered in dire poverty and despair.

Protesters of President Donald Trump's immigration policies chant across the street from the U.S. Customs and Border Protection station Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, in McAllen, Texas. (Joel Martinez/The Monitor via AP)

Immigration Order No. 2

The fight over who controls U.S. immigration policy is about to enter Round Two. President Trump pledges to come out swinging with a reformulated restriction on prospective immigrants. He seems deadly serious about defending the nation's borders, and those who want to throw open the borders to everyone seem just as determined to stop him. The outcome will determine nothing less than who defines America.

FILE - In this Feb. 15, 2017 file photo, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington before the House Financial Services Committee for the Fed's semi-annual Monetary Policy Report to Congress.  Federal Reserve officials earlier this month discussed the need to raise a key interest rate again "fairly soon," especially if the economy remains strong. Minutes of the discussions in minutes released Wednesday, Feb. 22  showed that while Fed officials decided to keep a key rate unchanged at their Jan. 31-Feb. 1 meeting, there was growing concern about what could happen to inflation if the economy out-performed expectations. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The regulator cometh, and maybe goeth

There's a lot to be said about government regulation -- and much of it not good. Some regulation, given that human nature is what it is, is necessary. But sometimes it seems there's little difference between the government telling you how to spend your money and the government just taking it. Regulations are a lot like taxes.

Looking back at who Obama could have been

In the great swirl of people and ideas and the high winds of political rhetoric and journalistic overkill howling through Washington during the early days of the Trump administration, it's hard to remember just what preceded it all -- an extended period of not much presided over by a somewhat detached figure with an academic sense of irony who did no irreparable damage, presided over no catastrophes, quietly turned over the keys to the White House when the moment arrived, and just as quietly, seemed almost to fade away.

Illustration on the realities confronting Saudi Arabia's "industrial revolution" by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The kingdom, the power and the oil

Saudi Arabia is changing. When government officials here tell you that, you take it with an oversized grain of salt. But when Saudi human rights activists say the same, you pay attention.

Illustration on President Obama's comparative literary stature by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama compares himself to Abraham Lincoln, but 44 and grammar do not agree

Did you know this? "Not since Lincoln has there been a president as fundamentally shaped -- in his life, convictions and outlook on the world -- by reading and writing as Barack Obama." Frankly, I did not know President Obama was so wedded to books and the printed word as to be compared to Abraham Lincoln, author of the Gettysburg Address, magisterial Second Inaugural, and devotee of Shakespeare.

Annette Smith     The Washington Times

Vermont's unsung hero

After years of battling the powers that be in relative anonymity, in January the Burlington Free Press named Annette Smith "Vermonter of the Year." That's a much kinder title than some others have applied.

Maple tree sap drips from a tap into a bucket, Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017, in Brookline, N.H. Sen. Maggie Hassan, D-NH, led a discussion with maple syrup producers in New Hampshire about how climate change is impacting their industry. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

Carbonated politics

Every problem in Washington finally finds a solution, and it's usually called a tax. A group of policy mavens, eager to do something for everybody, proposes to tax carbon, the substance found in all forms of fossil fuels. It's the fourth-most abundant element in the universe. The idea is that if there's a levy on the carbon content of oil, coal and natural gas, consumers will use less of it. Presto! No more human-caused global warming. But it still smells like a tax.

Stranded vehicles stand loaded with goods after the Jammu-Srinagar highway remained closed, at Jammu, India, Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017. The Jammu-Srinagar national highway remained closed for vehicular traffic for the second day Tuesday following landslides triggered by rains, officials said. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)

Unhappy motoring ahead

After years of slow but steady decline, traffic fatalities on the nation's highways and byways are increasing again. If the death and injury toll continues to rise in the years ahead, it's likely the fault of government supervision gone awry.