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Illustration on Obama's undermining of the U.S. military by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Undermining the military

When President Obama announced that he was going to “fundamentally transform” America, not many Americans understood the full depth of that statement. Based on an assessment of his policies over the last six and half years, clearly one of Mr. Obama’s objectives has been to diminish America’s standing and leadership role throughout the world. One result has been that our allies now don’t trust us and our enemies don’t fear us — the worst possible combination.

President Johnson signs Medicare legislation July 30, 1965.                Associated Press photo

Medicare at age 50

Diehard defenders of President Obama’s continuing, wretched rollout of the Affordable Care Act may be quick to point out that other government programs, most notably Medicare, also had rocky starts. But the historical record doesn’t support such nonsense.

Illustration on courtesy, respect and rules in the U.S. Senate by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When tough talk roils the decorum of the Senate

The United States Senate has a long and justly celebrated tradition of comity and respect among members. Although there have been occasional exceptions throughout history, on the whole, senators have taken great care to treat each other with courtesy and respect, both in private discussions and in public deliberations.

Peace Through Strength Bunker Bomb Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Reviving ‘peace through strength’

Ever since the Ayatollah Khomeini and his Islamist storm troops took over Iran in 1979, the driving force of the country’s rulers has been (1) destroy Israel; (2) establish Iran as the hegemonist of the Middle East; and (3) drive out all Western influences from the region. Their efforts to create a nuclear arsenal has been part of their strategy to accomplish these goals.

Illustration on the controversy stirred during the creation of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Surviving ‘a perfect storm’ of opposition

Just two months ago, the nation marked the 40th anniversary of the fall of Saigon, and many of the stories in the media were illustrated with images of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial on the Mall, which over the past three decades has become an American cultural icon — symbolizing that difficult period in our history. Yet, that memorial, as we know it today, almost didn’t happen.

Pinocchio (Associated Press)

When the Big Lie becomes the legacy

- The Washington Times

Maybe the Christian thing to do is to cut John Kerry a little slack. He hit his head harder than the doctor thought when he fell off his bicycle in Switzerland.

Presidential candidate Donald Trump    Illustration by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Let Trump be Trump

Politics — and politicians in a democracy — are a true reflection of society’s virtues and faults at a given window in time.

Illustration on the dominance of the U.N in the Obama/Iran nuclear arms deal by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Fantasists, bumblers and Iran

First the Obama administration denied that any secret side deals were made when they negotiated the agreement that they insist us will prevent Iran from producing and deploying nuclear weapons. Secretary of State Kerry assured us that it was a “fantasy” to believe there could have been a better deal, and the president said the only alternative is war.

Alternative delegate from Jean, La., Billy Durnley wears a large elephant buckle at the Republican National Convention, Tampa, Fla., Tuesday, August 28, 2012. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

Creating a case for conservatism

Being conservative in a politically correct culture has never been easy. Whether you’re a politician trying to explain a controversial sound-bite, or a voter attempting to defend your stance on a hot-button issue to co-workers, you either grow a thick skin — or learn to keep quiet.

Illustration on ending taxpayer funding of Planned Parenthood by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The moral terrorism of Planned Parenthood

Like many of you, when I first heard the undercover video of a Planned Parenthood official discussing in a detached and macabre manner the selling of aborted baby parts, I was physically sickened.

Illustration on the Obama Iran nuclear arms deal by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘Peace for our time’

Banner headlines in a prominent national newspaper read “NUKE DEAL PAVES WAY FOR NEW ERA: Sworn Foes U.S., Iran Aim To Bury Hatchet” — without sarcasm. For critics of the Iran nuclear deal, such undeserved praise is ominously reminiscent of the adulatory press that greeted British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain and his ill-fated Munich agreement, upon returning from meeting Adolph Hitler in Nazi Germany on the eve of World War II, declaring, “Peace for our time.”

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Regulator should understand the industry

Credit unions hold six percent of the business lending market. Credit-union business loans are made in the local community and are typically focused on small businesses, churches and real-estate rentals. The average credit union business loan is less than $225,000. During the financial crisis the highest loss rate was less tha one percent. Do these loans sound like the "risky large loans," as your editorial suggests ("End run by the credit unions," Web, July 26)?

Deal great for U.S.-hating Iran

President Obama and Secretary of State Kerry have put the United States and other countries in jeopardy by entering into an agreement with Iran which temporarily curbs Tehran's nuclear-armaments program. Either our leaders have been duped or they are naive (or both). Mr. Obama and Mr. Kerry are more concerned about their respective legacies than the security of the world.

Retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson, a native of Detroit,  lays out his presidential platform Monday, May 4, 2015, at Detroit's Music Hall that he is running for president. I'm Ben Carson and I'm a candidate for president for the United States," Carson said, before declaring — incorrectly now — that "I'm not a politician." Carson will now visit Texas, where his mother is gravely ill, before flying to Iowa to campaign. (Regina H. Boone/Detroit Free Press via AP)

Ben Carson, Rand Paul among GOP luminaries attending rally against Planned Parenthood at US Capitol

- The Washington Times

Student-organized "Women Betrayed" rallies are numerous on Tuesday against Planned Parenthood following the release of three undercover videos offering evidence that the organization profited from the sale of aborted baby parts. Sixty events are planned in cities nationwide, according to Students for Life President Kristan Watkins. Some GOP heavyweights will attend the event in the nation's capital.

Amazon Watch an Ecuador advocate

Your July 15, 2015, article about Amazon Watch's ongoing campaign to hold Chevron accountable for its 18-billion-gallon toxic mess in Ecuador omits critical facts and propagates falsehoods ("Amazon Watch still backs Steven Donziger's discredited Chevron lawsuit after others bail," Web).

President should protect all life

President Obama, a strong gun-control advocate, is at it again. He takes to the airways to selectively use tragic gun killings to advance the cause of taking guns away from innocent, law-abiding gun owners ("Obama 'most frustrated' by inability to pass gun control,' Web, July 24) .

With Obama, assume the worst

Why are veterans stunned and baffled by President Obama's late-night talk-show "rosy assessment" of VA reforms ("Obama touts VA progress, claims wait times reduced to 'just a few days,'" Web, July 21)?

Harry S. Truman

Where is a Democratic barn-burner?

If the Democrats want to be taken seriously, and something more than a party of self-righteous whiners, they must start acting like the party of Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S Truman and John F. Kennedy. All the fun shouldn't be left to the Republicans. Why should the nation be deprived of a contest for the Democratic nomination for president, the usual cat fight that always invigorated Democratic Party politics?

Tel Aviv has long sought the release of Jonathan Pollard, a former intelligence analyst convicted in 1987 of spying for Israel. He is serving a life sentence. (Associated Press)

Parole for Jonathan Pollard

Close relationships, whether human or nation-to-nation, are always complicated. Almost any Thanksgiving Day dinner table is a demonstration of that, with brothers and sisters and cousins and aunts stepping carefully to avoid spoiling the turkey and spilling the cranberries. So it is with nation-to-nation relationships, too. As close it is, no country-to-country relationship is more complicated than America's relationship with Israel.

Earth Igloo Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Promoting very unsettled science

If you have been to the beach at Treasure Island, Florida (adjoining St. Petersburg), you will notice something very odd. The hotels (many of which were built in the 1950s and '60s) and the seawall are very far from the water in the Gulf of Mexico — giving an extraordinarily wide beach. It was not always that way. When the hotels and seawall were built, they were set back from the high tide a normal hundred yards or so; but over the years, there was a natural but unforeseen accretion to the beach — which, having grown up in the area, I observed. (It can be seen on Google Earth.)

Earth to Kepler-452b

NASA has discovered the answer to all of our problems. It is another planet, a possible twin to Earth that could theoretically sustain life.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Being Nixon: A Man Divided'

Slowly but surely, the ranks of the rabid Nixon haters are thinning, to be replaced by more thoughtful and temperate writers and historians, free from the fierce ideological biases of the last century, able to look at Richard Nixon's accomplishments as well as his failures, and to examine the man himself without the intense personal rancor of an earlier ideological era.