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Illustration on the deteriorating Secret Service by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Secret Service’s rotten culture

Nothing illustrates so well how rotten the Secret Service’s management culture is as an assistant director’s effort to retaliate against a member of Congress by advocating leaking embarrassing information about him.

Creating a buffet for Russian tyrants

Russia is sweeping into Syria with what one defense official described to Fox News as “the largest deployment of Russian forces outside the former Soviet Union since the collapse of the USSR.”

Score one for the Tea Party

Remember the much-maligned Tea Party movement? These were the patriotic Americans — millions of them — who took to the streets and the town halls across America and revolted against President Bush’s corporate bailouts, President Obama’s stimulus spending blowout and Obamacare, and the Federal Reserve’s policy of tossing trillions of dollars out of helicopter windows (figuratively).

United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon is joined by Somali President Hassan Sheikh Mohamoud during a high level meeting on Somalia at U.N. headquarters, Monday, Sept. 28, 2015. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

When world leaders got garbage for lunch

- The Washington Times

They gave the world leaders, in town for the opening session of the United Nations, lunch in New York the other day and all they got was swill. The leaders munching on the people’s dime said a good time was had by all, but that’s only if your taste runs to garbage. The chefs cheerfully conceded that that garbage was what it was.

Illustration on the changing and perilous situation of presidential candidates by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How the election revolution has arrived

Apolitical revolution is taking place in America. The process of selecting party presidential candidates has been transformed in the last two or three election cycles. Now we have the early debates designed to drive poll numbers and tell us who’s “ahead” and who’s “behind,” who’s “gaining” and who’s “dropping.”

Illustration on merging health insurance providers by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Proving their medicine is a good as their perks

The planned mergers of four of America’s largest health insurers — Anthem with Cigna, and Aetna with Humana — has triggered a vigorous debate in academic and policy circles.

Illustration on National Manufacturing Day by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Celebrating manufacturing

This morning when you looked at your calendar, you probably didn’t realize that today (Friday) is Manufacturing Day. Even though it’s not a national holiday (no, you don’t get to stay home from work), this day is still noteworthy.

Illustration on the increasingly dangerous international situation developing in Syria by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

Pursuing contradictory goals

The Russian intervention in Syria is straight out of a Cold War nightmare, conceivably even a countdown to Armageddon updated for the 21st century. Such “Mideast contingencies” were constant focal points of war-games that often recurred during my 30-year military career.

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy of Calif., pauses as he speaks about foreign policy during the John Hay Initiative, Monday, Sept. 28, 2015, at a hotel in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) ** FILE **

Kevin McCarthy revisits Benghazi

When House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy blurted out on Fox News September 30 that: “Everybody thought Hillary Rodham Clinton was unbeatable, right? But we [the Republicans] put together a Benghazi special committee, a select committee.

Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks as he heads a meeting of the Presidential Council for Civil Society and Human Rights at the Alexadrovsky Hall in the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015. (Yuri Kochetkov/Pool photo via AP)

Now Russia turns to Syria

Russia’s daring entry into the Syrian war is Vladimir Putin’s riskiest move yet to challenge the West, especially President Obama, after he got away with murder in eastern Ukraine.

Illustration on Pope Francis' U.S. visit by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Papal burnout

Unpopular though it may be to say so, I, for one, grew exhausted by the nonstop pronouncements and commentaries of Pope Francis. The spiritual leader of 1 billion Catholics — roughly half of the world’s Christians — Francis just completed a high-profile, endlessly publicized visit to the United States.

Related Articles

Conservatives sick of wheeler dealers

If we had a Senate majority leader who provided real leadership, the Republicans could have used reconciliation in the Senate to defund President Obama's amnesty, health-care and Planned Parenthood endeavors, giving the Democrats a dose of their own bad medicine that has harmed the lives and health of many Americans.

Politics pushed USPS into red

In a commentary piece on the U.S. Postal Service's plans to upgrade its vehicle fleet, Ken Blackwell called the Postal Service "the poster child for government waste" ("How the Postal Service continues to burn money," Web, Aug. 27). He's wrong on the merits and the facts.

The coming coding conundrum

"Gray's Anatomy" illustrated the entire human body with 1,247 engravings when it was published in 1918, but starting today doctors must employ nearly 70,000 codes to document their efforts to heal it.

Russian President President Vladimir Putin listens to United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon after the 70th session of the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters, New York, Monday, Sept. 28, 2015. (Mikhail Klimentyev, RIA-Novosti, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

When big talk meets action

President Obama was full of talk this week, declaring that as the world's greatest military power the United States will defeat the Islamic State, also known as ISIS. No argument here. The United States can defeat any enemy it seriously sets out to defeat.

Martland's treatment unsurprising

The U.S. Army discharges decorated and brave Sgt. First Class Charles Martland for having the temerity to stand up for young children in Afghanistan who are regularly raped and sexually abused by perverted old scumbags on an American military base.

Illustration contrasting Democrat and GOP views of the presidency by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Love and hate for big government

The two parties' differing views of big government explain their differing challenges in winning the 2016 presidential election.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Stephen Harper'

Stephen Harper became the 22nd prime minister of Canada on Feb. 6, 2006. The Conservative Party leader has focused his time and energies on important issues such as lower taxes, smaller government, fiscal responsibility and strong foreign policy measures.

Illustration on Calvin Coolidge's views on taxation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Taxing propositions

The White House Historical Association is promoting a Christmas ornament honoring our 30th president, Calvin Coolidge.