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Vice President Mike Pence, left, greets President Donald Trump as he steps off Air Force One as he arrives Tuesday, Aug. 22, 2017, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Laying waste to the party of Lincoln and Reagan

Isn’t it time the president stage an intervention to save Congress from itself? As leader of the Republican Party, the president has every right, even a duty, to intervene when it becomes clear his own party leadership is not only obstructing the will of the people, but is doing damage to the country.

Replacing patriotism with tribalism

Just after last week’s terrorist attack in Barcelona, a pro-Islamic State website posted video from the scene along with a message in Arabic saying, “Terror is filling the hearts of the Crusader in the Land of Andalusia.”

Trump's Baloney Detector Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Donald Trump’s baloney detector annoys his critics

President Trump is in trouble again with his moral superiors. His problem, of course, is that he cannot throttle his baloney detector. Mr. Trump, it seems, at some point in life acquired a baloney detector that has usually served him well. It certainly served him well during his long years in business and during his brief time in politics. Now, however, it is problematic.

Incentive to Save Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Living with low interest rates

No matter what President Trump and Congress do about taxes and the like, low interest rates are becoming as certain as aging. That’s good news for young folks buying homes but tough on retirees who rely on CDs and bonds, and people over 55 realigning portfolios for retirement.

Iran Turkey Rivalry Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Iran versus Turkey, again

News that Iran’s and Turkey’s governments reached an accord on Idlib, a Syrian town now the focus of American interests, brings relations between the two of the largest and most influential states in the Middle East momentarily out of the shadows.

Women have a tea as workers march towards Plaza de Mayo, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Tuesday, Aug. 22, 2017. Thousands of union workers marched against the economic policies of President Mauricio Macri. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)

Time for organized labor to end forced dues

Given the heated rhetoric that surrounds the right to work, you might believe that the concept threatens the very existence of unions. However, as a former union president I can assure you that the ability to collect fees from people who don’t want to join the union is not only unnecessary, but that ultimately it undermines union officials’ legitimacy when speaking for voluntary members.

Illustration comparing Trump's administration with Clinton's by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Not the first wounded presidency

Liberals predicting Donald Trump’s impending political demise should recall one of their own: Bill Clinton. Mr. Clinton already plumbed President Trump’s worst-case scenarios and survived. Even congressional Republicans, for whom a “Clinton reprise” is a bigger threat, have less to fear than liberals would like to believe.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau gives a speech at NATO headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, Thursday, May 25, 2017. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham) ** FILE **

Madness! Even the giraffes have gone crazy

- The Washington Times

We owe Chicken Little an apology. Maybe the sky really is falling. Evidence is everywhere. Cries and whimpers suddenly grow deafening as the landscape is dusted with snowflakes, who imagine they’re unique and have in common with other snowflakes only an extremely low melting point.

Chart to accompany Rahn article of Aug. 22, 2017.

The price-level dilemma

Is more inflation desirable? Those at the Federal Reserve seem to think so, and they have explicitly said their target is 2 percent, or about double the current level.

Illustration on removing Confederate statues and monuments by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

Historical hysteria

We will learn even less from history if we wipe it clean, as some are trying to do by removing statues of Confederate leaders whose beliefs about slavery and race most, including me, find offensive. Conversation beats censorship.

Illustration on anarchist and totalitarian strains in the leftist Antifa movement by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Old hatreds made new

Amid the chaos of Charlottesville, two specters from the previous century’s darkest hours have re-emerged. Alongside the well-publicized Nazi symbols on full display during the “Unite the Right” rally, so too were Communist hammers and sickles brandished by the opposing anti-fascist or “Antifa” protesters.

Illustration on Mitch McConnell by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Forgetting McConnell’s greatest achievement

Mitch McConnell has been taking quite a beating from President Trump for failing to get a health care reform bill through the Senate, but even Mr. Trump has largely conceded that John McCain, alone blew up the majority leader’s painstakingly crafted compromise.

Presidential Courage Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

North Korea and fear

At the heart of the Cold War, the ever-present nuclear threat had a profound effect on the American psyche. Children hiding under desks during air raid drills during the 1960s and 1970s had longer-term implications in terms of mental and physical health as studies in the 1980s revealed.

Union Vote Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Union workers celebrate right-to-work laws

As summer temperatures continue in the 90s, August beachgoers aren’t the only ones feeling the heat. In Missouri, union employees are getting burned by efforts to block implementation of right-to-work.

Related Articles

Indian history viewed from the bottom up

History is a bit like sedimentary rock. Viewed from a distance it appears solid, consistent and stable. But subject it to heavy scrutiny -- and perhaps a few skeptical taps -- and you discover layer upon fragile layer of differing often conflicting elements you'd never guess were there. This is particularly true of the history of the Indian subcontinent, never completely united and overrun by wave after wave of alien masters.

Demonstrators with flags and signs gather to protest illegal immigration, Sunday, Aug. 20, 2017, in Laguna Beach, Calif. A small group of people demonstrating against illegal immigration was outnumbered by hundreds of counterprotesters who gathered to denounce racism in the coastal California city. (AP Photo/Christopher Weber)

All aboard the censor ship

The angry and occasionally violent left has drawn the battle lines and demands that America choose a side. On one side, in the view from the left, are the liberals who call themselves "progressives," pious bearers of righteousness, devoid of bad motives and without original sin. On the other side is everyone else, deplorables, yahoos, bigots, racists and other bad people whose unpardonable sin is that they voted for Donald Trump. "Deplorables" have no rights, and the mob is entitled to impose "justice."

We deserve high-speed government

President Trump had to fire Chief White House Strategist Steve Bannon; new Chief of Staff John F. Kelly has to show that he has control of the White House staff. Why, exactly, does this staff not understand that they are supposed to be invisible and work behind the scenes?

Gabriel Thomas, 5, of Waverly Twp., Pa. looks through his special glasses to watch the solar eclipse at Keystone College's Thomas G. Cupillari Observatory in Dalton, Pa., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (Christopher Dolan/The Times & Tribune via AP)

Lessons in the dark

Crowds gathered with eager anticipation. There were runs on "eclipse sunglasses," with 7-Eleven running out early, and Amazon accused of selling sunglasses that weren't guaranteed to keep out the right rays. Amazon might deliver on the protective gear, so the street wisdom went, but you might go blind.

(ew.com)

Rewriting the rules on sex scandals and politics

- The Washington Times

At first glance "Young Jane Young" seems like a simple beach read. The stylish cover is bright gold and features a minimalist portrait of a woman on the cover with hands on her hips. The book is tall and not terribly thick. It looks like it'll be a light, breezy read. Looks are deceptive.

In this picture taken Saturday, Oct. 8, 2016, an exterior view shows the facade of the former St. George church, physical reminder of the Little Syria neighborhood, that now serves as bar in Lower Manhattan, New York. Little Syria was a neighborhood that existed between the 1880s and 1940s in Lower Manhattan and was composed of Arab-Americans, both Christians and Muslims, who arrived from what is now Syria and surrounding countries. Little Syria was a paradise and a poor slum, a way station and long-term destination. Its merchants introduced Middle Eastern food to many in the West. Its authors, poets and journalists told stories that bridged the cultures. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)

Millennials find unity, strength in Christ

This past week, our Florida barrier island home was invaded by 10 "twenty somethings." I say "invaded" because their laughter, energy and noise gloriously shattered my solitude. But they were actually invited, mostly because of the joyful noise they make.

Illustration on Putin's long-term strategy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Putin's strategy and the U.S. response

At the end of the Cold War, Russia was a facsimile of itself. Shorn of empire, the Russians appeared to be a weak regional power, if that.

Trump's record on race

One lesson I've learned from working for Donald Trump is that you have to pay attention to what he does, not what he says. The left and the media are on a rampage accusing President Trump of being a racist and Nazi-KKK sympathizer because of his words in response to the horrid events in Charlottesville.

The Extinction of the Republican Party Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Replacing the Republican Party

Having refused to repeal Obamacare, the Republican Party is dead, as was the Whig Party in 1854 after it colluded in the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act which opened these territories to slavery.