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Former US President Barack Obama is awarded the German Media Prize 2016 in Baden-Baden, Germany, Thursday, May 25, 2017.(AP Photo/Michael Probst)

The latest news from the president in exile

- The Washington Times

The government in exile — the real one, according to the media — has had a busy week at home and abroad. “President Obama” has given up leading from behind and presumes now to lead from overseas. His secretary of state has a new mission, as missionary to the safe places where snowflakes fall.

Illustration on Obama's Labor Board legacy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Ending the Obama labor board majority

Elections have consequences, or at least they are supposed to. Unfortunately for the rights of independent workers who don’t want to associate with a labor union, more than 100 days have passed since Barack Obama left office, but the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) remains in the hands of an Obama majority intent on pushing the limits of Big Labor’s forced unionism powers. It doesn’t need to be that way.

Illustration on Confederate soldiers buried in Arlington Cemetery by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Memorial Day must honor all of America’s fallen

As president of the American Veterans Center, the organization that produces the National Memorial Day Parade in Washington D.C., I am sometimes questioned as to why we include Confederate reenactors in our timeline of American military history.

Illustration on tax reform by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The case for tax and entitlement reform

Lobbyists are out in full force to block genuine tax reform. If Congress bends, great harm will come to ordinary folk — fewer good-paying jobs and a federal government too strapped to care for seniors and the truly needy.

Illustration on Trump's "Russian' problems by Kevin Kreneck/Tribune Content Agency

Possible crimes and cover-ups

In his first four months in office, President Trump has achieved the dubious distinction of being investigated by an independent prosecutor and at least five major oversight committees in Congress run by his own party.

FILE - In this Oct. 26, 2016, file photo, one of the remaining cows on Alabama farmer David Bailey's farm, walks towards a pile of hay to be fed, surrounded by dirt where ankle deep green grass use to be, acceding to Bailey, in Dawson, Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson, File)

What’s the cattlemen’s beef? Washington

- The Washington Times

David Cook is a cattleman, a rancher and a member of the Arizona State House. He’s no Beltway insider. Mr. Cook came to Washington this week to spell out his beef. In short, he wants Congress to stop trying to lasso other ranchers and rural Americans with regulations.

Illustration on the need for Arab states to deal with Islamist terror by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A harsh message worth sending

Just when everyone here was deep in preoccupation with partisan fantasy over whether Donald Trump should be impeached or removed by the 25th Amendment, the president changed the subject. Presidents can do that.

Illustration on Saudia Arabian duplicity by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Saudi Arabia’s duplicity

Trusting Saudi Arabia to combat terrorists and extremists and “drive them out,” as President Trump called on the kingdom and other Arab and Muslim nations to do in his Riyadh speech, is akin to forging an alliance with the Ku Klux Klan to combat racism and anti-Semitism.

Protesters from labor and other progressive groups fill the rotunda of the state Capitol in St. Paul, Minn., on Wednesday, May 24, 2017, to demand that Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton veto the bills that passed before the Minnesota Legislature's special session bogged down earlier in the day. (AP Photo/Steve Karnowski)

The dirty secret behind big labor’s decline

- The Washington Times

My father was a toolmaker and union organizer who, for many years, headed the Rockford, Ill. Labor Council while my mother was serving five terms as head of the Women’s Auxiliary of the United Auto Workers. Dad worked as a machinist and my mother as a waitress and clerk in a local jewelry store until my dad retired and joined a couple of buddies to buy a bar.

Cutting Taxes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A rare chance to boost small businesses

Among the many lessons our current leadership should learn from Ronald Reagan’s effective governance are his initiatives to revitalize the American economy. Most relevant today is remembering President Reagan’s tax cuts and corporate tax reform of 1986 enacted with bipartisan support that produced sustained economic growth.

FILE - In this Saturday, May 20, 2017 file photo, President Donald Trump holds a sword and sways with traditional dancers during a welcome ceremony at Murabba Palace, in Riyadh. Trump and his entourage were treated to a traditional all-male Saudi sword dance. Standing shoulder-to-shoulder with the Saudi king, Trump swayed side to side and briefly joined the groove. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Trump’s vision for the Middle East

President Trump arrived in the Arabian desert hoping to realign the politics of the Middle East in the aftermath of a failed Obama policy. For eight years, President Obama tilted in the direction of Iran, believing that the influence of the Shia could balance Sunni dominance.

Illustration on biometric screening security measures by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Integrating biometrics into visitor screening

The horrible attack in Manchester, coupled with the recent release of the Department of Homeland Security’s Visa Overstay Report, should again force us to ask the question, are we doing everything we can to properly vet those seeking to come to the United States?

Related Articles

Journalist Bob Woodward sits at the head table during the White House Correspondents' Dinner in Washington, Saturday, April 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen) ** FILE **

Bob Woodward's right -- the media is 'smug'

- The Washington Times

Bob Woodward, one of the legendary Washington Post journalists who broke Watergate said reporters ought to tread carefully, or face the risk of tripping over their own smug attitudes. That's a pretty apt summary of the nastiness and snark that passes as Investigative Reporting, and Hard Journalism these days.

Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway listens as Budget Director Mick Mulvaney speak to the media about President Donald Trump's proposed fiscal 2018 federal budget in the Press Briefing Room at the White House in Washington, Tuesday, May 23, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

AP fires freelancer for anti-Trump post

- The Washington Times

The Associated Press, in a near-unprecedented move for a mainstream news outlet, fired a freelance journalist it employed after it was discovered she posted anti-Donald Trump remarks on her Facebook page in 2016 -- and then sneaked into a closed Republican event and reported negatively on Kellyanne Conway.

Illustration on domestic political threats to the Trump presidency by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

Is President Trump in trouble?

The bad news for President Trump keeps coming his way, notwithstanding a generally bravura performance on the foreign stage this past week in Riyadh, Jerusalem and Vatican City. Yet while he is overseas, his colleagues here in the United States have been advising him to hire criminal defense counsel, and he has apparently begun that process. Can the president be charged with obstructing justice when he asks that federal investigations of his friends be shut down?

How soap operas became 'art'

It has long been fashionable in intellectual and academic circles to disdain soap operas, especially in their heyday in the final decades of the 20th century when groups of students would gather round televisions in common areas to watch them. The snobbish horror from professors that students should be "wasting their time" entirely missed the point. Sure, like the culturally respectable grand operas whose name they latched onto, they had their ridiculous sides and ludicrous moments.

Red-tape ridiculousness

If all an administration did was regulatory reform, it would positively affect economic growth. Very often it is not just the federal government, but state and local governments, too, that drastically increase the cost of living and lower the quality of life for their residents.

Tired Trump addiction

When I checked for the news last night both Fox News and CNN were reporting what they labeled "breaking news." Fox was reporting on the terrorist bomb attack in Manchester, England. CNN had four commentators discussing another of their stories on President Trump and Russia collusion ("breaking news" for three months now).

Women cry after placing flowers in a square in central Manchester, Britain, Wednesday, May 24, 2017, after the suicide attack at an Ariana Grande concert that left more than 20 people dead and many more injured, as it ended on Monday night at the Manchester Arena. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

The shame of empty outrage

Once more, we're running out of adjectives in the war against terrorism. The "leaders" in the West, from aldermen to senators to heads of state across the globe, line up as usual to denounce the savage who demonstrated his faith and his manhood by murdering little girls in the name of Allah. (Surely Allah deserves better.)

FILE - In this May 20, 2017 file photo, President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump visit an art exhibit with Saudi King Salam at the Royal Court Palace in Riyadh. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Thinking twice about 'reform' in Iran

The arc of history may bend toward justice, as Barack Obama often argued, but sometimes it bends in another direction. Iran has just re-elected President Hassan Rouhani, and this, the West is told, is good news because it's bad news for radical Islamic terrorism. Skepticism advances the cause of moderation.

Budget Director Mick Mulvaney testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, May 24, 2017, before the House Budget Committee hearing on President Donald Trump's fiscal 2018 federal budget. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

A pro-work, pro-jobs, pro-growth budget

Mick Mulvaney is new to the job but he's on a pace to be the best presidential budget director in modern times. The budget and tax blueprint he stitched together makes all the right moves. It stresses the need for economic growth and advocates the tax and regulatory policies that would get us there.

Katy Perry performs at Wango Tango at StubHub Center on Saturday, May 13, 2017, in Carson, Calif. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)

Katy Perry's delusional hug-a-terrorist approach

- The Washington Times

Katy Perry, pop star-turned-Hillary Clinton-gal-Friday-turned-anti-Trumpeteer, offered up the bubble of all bubble responses to the terror attack at the Ariana Grande concert in Manchester that left adults and kids alike dead and injured -- and it went something like this: All we need is love.