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FILE - In this March 20, 2013 file photo, President Barack Obama and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu huddle during their joint news conference in Jerusalem, Israel. This was never happy-ever-after waiting to happen. When Obama and Netanyahu took office early in 2009, there were plenty of reasons to expect their relationship would be difficult. The cerebral president and the brash prime minister have stark differences in personality, politics and world views. Still, few could have predicted the downward spiral of finger-pointing, backbiting, lecturing and outright name-calling that has occurred. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

The occasion the Democrats asked for

- The Washington Times

The Democrats set out to teach John Boehner and Benjamin Netanyahu a lesson. They would boycott the Israeli prime minister’s speech to Congress and apply enough pressure to cancel the speech, keep Mr. Netanyahu at home and embarrass the Republicans who invited him here. What a happy day’s work that would be.

American Defense if Israel Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Standing with Israel in a dangerous world

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu will address a joint session of Congress on Tuesday. Such an invitation is one of the highest honors we can bestow on a foreign leader. And such a speech is normally an occasion of unity in Washington, when elected officials put partisan politics aside and come together to focus on weighty issues of national security.

Failure to Protect Against Iranian Nukes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When Iran goes nuclear

Our attention these days with regard to security is understandably riveted on the Islamic State, or ISIS, and its hideous decapitations, rapes and live immolations. We must deal with the Islamic State, but it is not the gravest threat we face. The Israelis are right — we should awaken to the fact that the coming of a nuclear Iran holds special dangers and requires particularly urgent attention. There are four driving reasons.

Obama Veto of Keystone Pipeline Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s Keystone XL pipeline veto

Experienced vote counters do not believe that either the House or the Senate will muster the two-thirds majority necessary to override President Obama’s veto of the Keystone XL pipeline bill. If so, Mr. Obama’s years of delay and disingenuousness on this issue, culminating in his veto, will guarantee negative consequences for America long into the future.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu gestures while addressing the 2015 American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) Policy Conference in Washington, Monday, March 2, 2015. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Standing with Israel

A world leader giving an address to Congress shouldn’t be controversial, especially when that leader is the prime minister of a major U.S. ally — indeed, a bulwark of freedom in a deeply troubled region of the world.

Attendees vote in the CPAC 2015 Straw Poll at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in National Harbor, Md. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

CPAC then and now

A conservative reflects on the annual confab.

Illustration on the progressive tax structure by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Do the rich pay their fair share?

Suppose there were a banquet for 100 people and at the end of the night it was time to split the bill of $50 per person. If that bill were paid for the way we pay our income taxes, here is how it would work. Those in the top half of income would pay roughly $97 each and those in the bottom half of the income would pay an average of $3 each. Almost 40 people would pay nothing. And the single richest person in the room would cough up $1,750.

Illustration on the state of American liberty by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

CPAC, freedom and saving the country

Attendees of last week’s Conservative Political Action Committee (CPAC), the nation’s largest conference for conservatives, heard a few tried and true conservative messages from potential presidential candidates and activists alike — calls for lower taxes, more freedom for business, a strong national defense, the importance of killing the enemy and the need for a serious foreign policy.

Illustration on continuing political and existential threats to Israel by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Much ado about the wrong Israeli controversy

The brouhaha over Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s March 3 speech to Congress is diverting attention from more important U.S.-Israel controversies that will escalate soon after this comparatively minor contretemps fizzles out.

Illustration on patent protection by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Patent ‘reform’ is killing the right to invent

With the best intentions, and naively going along with the corporate world’s hugely financed publicity machine, Congress is about to stomp on America’s most creative citizens, its inventors.

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Staff Sgt. Christian Fuentes motivates recruits with Company F, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, as he moves down the rows during the senior drill instructor inspection at Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, Aug. 23, 2013.  The purpose of the inspection is to provide drill instructors an opportunity to test recruits in multiple areas, to include their uniforms.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin E. Woodle)

American soldiers in the Gelded Age

The left loathes the military and all it represents — honor, manliness, patriotism, selflessness and tradition. The ban on open homosexuality in the ranks, for example, was lifted in the lame-duck session of Congress in 2010 after the Democrats lost control of the House, and eight good little Republicans joined every Democrat in the Senate to repeal "Don't ask, don't tell."

Help own first

Former New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani had every right to express his opinion ("To love or not to love America," Web, Feb. 24). President Obama certainly has left an impression that he does not care about American citizens or about our country. He is spending millions of dollars to keep open our borders for illegal immigrants, even hiring extra help to process their documents.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker speaks at the winter meeting of the free market Club for Growth winter economic conference at the Breakers Hotel Saturday, Feb. 28, 2015, in Palm Beach, Fla.  (AP Photo/Joe Skipper)

Worker freedom grows in Wisconsin

Wisconsin may soon become the 25th state to adopt a right-to-work law, to guarantee that no worker can be compelled to join a union or to pay dues to a union. The state senate narrowly approved the legislation last week (by a vote of 17 to 15) and the bill is moving through the lower house. Gov. Scott Walker, who co-sponsored right-to-work legislation when he was a member of the legislature, says he will sign the legislation if it makes it to his desk.

GOP Surrender Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why we are sinking into tyranny

No wonder Mitch McConnell skipped this past week's Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC). He's too busy with his day job as Minority Leader of the United States Senate.

Christian florist is bullying victim

Our economy is built on the great concept of free enterprise. The demand-driven marketplace thrives on competition. It is not the proving ground for perceived social injustices. That would be the territory of a more socialistic, government-controlled economy.

A new website for conservative book lovers is up and running, with plenty of resources. (Salem Communications)

What's right to read? A new Conservative Book Club site reveals all - from Limbaugh to Huckabee

- The Washington Times

Those weary of politically correct book lists and elitist commentary have a new destination. The Conservative Book Club — founded 51 years ago — has a spiffy new online presence devoted to book reviews, news, and previews about hundreds of conservative-themed books and authors. Yes, there’s a Top-10 list - the top three this week are "Killing Patton: The Strange Death of WWII's Most Audacious General" by Bill O'Reilly; "God, Guns, Grits and Gravy" by Mike Huckabee; and Rush Revere and the American Revolution by Rush Limbaugh.

When personal disaster strikes

The tale Jill Ciment tells in "Act of God" is not funny. It's about a fungus infestation that leaves several families homeless and impoverished, and at least one person dead. Nonetheless, this novel breezes along, fizzing with wit as it sails toward a comic ending that leaves the surviving characters rich with possibilities.

Illustration on Obama's veto of the Keystone pipeline by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Killing Keystone

In the days leading up to President Obama's veto of the Keystone XL pipeline, 14 oil tanker railroad cars derailed in West Virginia and exploded in a fiery environmental disaster.

Convention could do more harm

Former Rep. Tom Coburn is correct in his op-ed, "A means to smite the federal Leviathan" (Web, Feb. 24), when he writes that the government has become a loose cannon and its powers need to be limited. However, Mr. Coburn's remedy will be worse than the disease he's trying to cure.

Thai elephant rides aid cruelty

Tourists who pay to ride elephants are essentially ensuring that those elephants will spend most of their lives miserable in chains ("Travel: Thailand's great elephant debate," Web, Feb. 24). Unwitting travelers are duped into believing that their money is going to "help" elephants, but international watchdogs have documented that wild elephants are being captured to perpetuate this lucrative tourist industry.

Illustration on safety improvements to oil rail transport by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Tanking up on safety

Railroads share the public's deep concern for the safe movement of crude oil by rail and, as recent incidents have shown us, freight railroads and others who share responsibility for the shipment of oil must continue to make improvements to ensure public confidence.

President Obama. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)

Governing the Chicago way

Barack Obama is a trailblazer. Most past presidents who get an electoral rebuke like the one he got November would have looked to the examples of Democratic and Republican presidents before him, and tried to accommodate both himself and Congress to reality, and move forward.

FILE - In this Oct. 1, 2014 file photo, President Barack Obama meets with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. President Barack Obama does not intend to be silent or out of sight when Netanyahu addresses Congress in a visit that was arranged by Speaker John Boehner behind the administration’s back. The breach of protocol has grown to what seems like a grudge match between two men who dislike each other.  Vice President Biden will be out of town during Netanyahu’s speech, leaving an empty chair behind the Israeli leader’s podium and Secretary of State John Kerry may conveniently find a foreign trip to be on that day as well. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

Time to be honest about Israel

Rather than a blow to a bipartisanship that simply doesn't exist, Mr. Netanyahu's acceptance of Mr. Boehner's invitation offers the possibility of clarity and a way forward.