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Illustration on the realities of gender difference by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Sex, gender, confusion and distraction

Sex and gender are serious subjects, but academics, pundits and the pop media have so stretched their meanings to use as weapons of political persuasion that the words sometimes don’t mean very much. Communication becomes confusion and distraction.

The Capitol is illuminated by the rising sun in Washington, Wednesday, March 29, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The congressmen and the counselor

Tony Hall served in Congress for 24 years, representing Ohio’s 3rd District. The Democrat left in 2002 to serve as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Agencies for Food and Agriculture, appointed by President George W. Bush.

Trashing the Filibuster Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Redeeming the filibuster

The Senate filibuster should be placed on the Endangered Species List. It is indeed endangered, and when it goes, an important element of our governmental system will go with it. Gone will be the Senate’s role as the country’s most deliberative governmental entity, where consensus reigns and the passions of the moment are subdued by calm, measured consideration of all angles and facets of any issue. It also is where vital checks can be placed on any abuse of the minority by the majority.

Cyber Warfare Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Warfare goes digital in the 21st century

Russia’s intelligence service hacks Democratic Party computer networks and puts out stolen emails in a bid to influence the 2016 election. China says it owns 90 percent of the South China Sea and begins building military bases under a vague historical claim to the strategic waterway. Iranian hackers break into American banks and a water control computer network at an upstate New York dam. Welcome to the new form of conflict in the 21st century: information warfare.

Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley speaks at the 2017 American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) Policy Conference held at the Verizon Center in Washington, Monday, March 27, 2017. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Nikki Haley’s full-bird flip to the U.N.

- The Washington Times

Oh, Nikki Haley. What a gem you’ve become. The South Carolina flag-flap is forgiven — so, too, the endorsement of Marco Rubio for president. Kicking it hard to the United Nations has lit up her political star once again.

In this Sept. 27, 2009 photo, skulls and bones from some of the estimated 10,000 Tutsis killed in a two-day massacre at Nyamata church during the 1994 genocide, are displayed in a crypt behind the church, now a memorial to the genocide, in the town of Nyamata, Rwanda.           Associated Press photo

Why Trump’s first overseas trip should include Africa

As the first African president to address Washington’s largest annual gathering of pro-Israel activists, Rwandan leader Paul Kagame underscored a key reason for his country’s natural kinship with the Jewish state: As two peoples who survived brutal extermination campaigns, they know the real-world consequences of inaction in the face of hate.

Illustration on the ideology behind Islamist terror by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A bloody day in London town

“The Kafir’s Blood Is Halal For You, So Shed it.” That’s just one of the catchier headlines in a recent issue of Rumiyah, a slick online magazine published by the Islamic State, also known as ISIS and ISIL.

Podesta Russian Ties Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Democrats’ double standard on ‘ties’ to Russia

- The Washington Times

Washington and the national media are all about double standards. It should come as no surprise to anyone that the sort of Russian “ties” used to condemn Republicans as possible agents of Moscow are dismissed as irrelevant when Democrats are revealed to have deeper, stronger and far more remunerative connections to Russian banks, oligarchs and institutions than any Republican currently being banished to the outer darkness by Democratic “progressives.”

Illustration on Liberal attitudes toward the Judiciary branch by Alexandewr Hunter/The Washington Times

Higher than the high court

The trials of Judge Neil M. Gorsuch, before the Senate Judiciary Committee en route almost certainly to his place on the Supreme Court, reveal one of my favorite findings regarding modern politics, to wit: The Democrats are the extremists, the Republicans are mainstream. The Democrats are the ideologues; the Republicans base their policies and political judgments usually on philosophy.

In this Sept. 8, 2015, file photo, a United Airlines passenger plane lands at Newark Liberty International Airport in Newark, N.J. United said on Monday, March 27, 2017, that regular-paying fliers are welcome to wear leggings aboard its flights, even though two teenage girls were barred by a gate agent from boarding a flight from Denver to Minneapolis Sunday because of their attire. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)

The left and leggings

Two girls needing to change out of their leggings in order to board a United Airlines flight caused quite the kerfuffle on social media, after a “bystander” named Shannon Watts went into a tweetstorm of clueless, self-righteous indignation. In other words, she was a professional liberal activist, something else the legacy media has chosen to not mention.

Illustration on the dangers of "dawa," Islamist indoctrination by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Confronting political Islam

It is important for the United States to tackle radical Islamist ideological indoctrination — dawa — before it takes root to the extent it has in Europe.

Davey Crockett Donation to Fire Victims Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The false compassion of liberalism

Last week on CNN I debated a liberal commentator who complained that the problem with the Trump budget blueprint is that it lacks “compassion” for the poor, children and the disabled. This woman went on to ask me how I could defend a budget that would cut Meals on Wheels, after-school programs, and special-ed funding, because without the federal dollars, these vital services would go away.

Illustration on the negatives of the Paris climate accords by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Toward a better climate sans Paris

It’s time for the United States to pull out of the Paris climate agreement entirely. On Tuesday, President Trump signed an executive order that promoted American energy security by rolling back several overreaching Obama-era regulations that are central to the Paris climate pact.

Neil Gorsuch, the scholar and the man

To hear others speak of 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge and Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch, it is as if the phrase “scholar and gentleman” were coined to describe him.

Related Articles

Tracing colonialism and its dissolution

The authors of this book translated from the German refer in their preface to the word they have used as their title as a "pallid term," but there is nothing pallid about the subject or their discussion of it. What they go on immediately to say about it indicates not just its complexity but the questions it evokes:

Health insurance made simple

Washington either does not understand or refuses to acknowledge that keeping costs down and protecting the interests of the consumer are best achieved by assuring good competition among private enterprise in a market characterized by a balance of supply and demand. The primary health-plan objectives of both major parties can be achieved pretty simply, and here's how:

Debt bubble near bursting

The liberals in Congress and across the country have bought into the false notion that a top-heavy bureaucracy and a massive group of people can efficiently serve the needs of a country that now has a population of more than 330 million. In all candor, our system of government has actually done pretty well when one considers the other countries and their various forms of government. However, there comes a point at which a government may no longer be able to pay its huge debt and risks being abandoned by the private citizens and foreign countries who own that debt. We are now at the $20-trillion-in-debt level, and the interest alone is becoming extremely problematic.

Republican leaders Rep. Tim Moore, left, and Sen. Phil Berger, hold a news conference Tuesday, March 28, 2017, in Raleigh, N.C., where they announced they thought they had reached a compromise with Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper on a replacement for HB2. Berger holds papers that he said were the Governor's proposal. The law limits LGBT nondiscrimination protections and requires transgender people to use public restrooms corresponding to the sex on their birth certificate.  (Chris Seward/The News & Observer via AP)

March Madness in the restroom

The National Collegiate Athletic Association, or NCAA, has been overcome by a form of March Madness that has nothing to do with basketball or brackets. It has everything to do with restrooms and political correctness on steroids.

Unleashing American energy

President Trump has nullified many of Barack Obama's climate change fantasies and the sky is still up there. But judging by the uproar from voices in the climate change industry, only an unexpected miracle is keeping the firmament in place. As cooler heads keep an eye on the thermometer in the months and years to come, America can balance legitimate concerns about pollution against the necessity of exploiting affordable energy.

Rep. Luis Gutierrez was placed in handcuffs Monday after refusing orders to leave a staged sit-in at the Chicago headquarters for Immigration and Customs Enforcement. (Twitter/@RepGutierrez)

Luis Gutierrez goes off reservation to defend sanctuary cities

- The Washington Times

Rep. Luis Gutierrez, Democrat from Illinois, has gone the proverbial off the reservation -- out to lunch, into the Twilight Zone, off his rocker, what have you -- in a Wednesday morning CNN "New Day" defense of sanctuary cities. He calls them Fourth Amendment cities, and says ICE has no legal right to intrude, absent a warrant.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton gestures while speaking before the Professional Businesswomen of California Tuesday, March 28, 2017, in San Francisco. Clinton is in San Francisco for one of her first public speeches since losing the 2016 presidential race. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

Hillary Clinton's anti-Trump screed utter nonsense

- The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton overcame her months of self-imposed silence to take the national stage and denounce President Donald Trump as a misogynist who's harming America -- while forgetting, at least publicly, Barack Obama's own White Male Only administration.

People attending an anti-Trump rally and protest hosted by filmmaker Michael Moore hold signs as they listen to speakers on a stage set up in front of the Trump International Hotel, Thursday, Jan. 19, 2017, in New York. President-elect Donald Trump, a New Yorker, is scheduled to take the oath of office Friday in Washington. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

Trump's climate change condemned as snuffing human life

- The Washington Times

Michael Moore, that Hollywood walk of famer who rose to national prominence by making movies showing why conservatives suck, now has a new exclamation mark to add to that sentence: President Donald Trump is destroying the world and extinguishing all of humanity. Oh man, this is bad, very bad.