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Illustration on salvaging the U.S./Iran nuclear agreement by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump’s third way

President Trump made a tough call last week. European diplomats and an “echo chamber” in the mainstream media were insisting he “recertify” the nuclear weapons deal his predecessor concluded with Iran’s rulers in 2015.

The Clinton Protection Racquet Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary and Harvey’s shared fate

I have been fascinated by Harvey Weinstein’s initial response to charges that the Bathrobed Romeo sexually molested women. His statement was at once otherworldly and yet weirdly similar to Hillary Clinton’s eventual response to the scandal. I say “eventual response” because it took her over a week to comment. Obviously, Hillary’s lawyers and public relations magicians had to word her response very carefully.

Illustration on the failure to "contain" Russia by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How America has failed to contain Russia

Seventy years ago, George Kennan’s “Sources of Soviet Conduct” set the course for U.S. containment policy toward the Soviet Union. Following the Soviet Union’s collapse and a decade of economic turmoil which resulted in reduced Russian regional as well as global influence, President Vladimir Putin began implementing a national security strategy to resurrect Russia’s great power status. He wanted Russia to be perceived as equal in stature to the United States and to ensure western ideals of freedom, liberty, and democracy would not threaten his regime security.

Teaching the Birds and Bees at School Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How federally funded sex education sexualizes schoolchildren

Upon returning to middle school from an orthodontist appointment to tighten his braces, 12-year-old Johnny struggles through a pre-algebra lecture then schlepps off to his health class where he is instructed in anal sex, oral sex, masturbation and sexual fantasy.

William Dodd Jr. speaks on the radio during debate within the United States on whether to enter World War II. International News Service photo.

How Russians meddled in the 1938 election

Did Russia meddle in the 2016 presidential election? President Donald Trump emphatically says “no.” But the hierarchy of the U. S. intelligence community is equally firm in saying “yes.” With three probes in progress — two by Congress, another by an independent counsel — an answer perhaps will eventually be found.

Stop the Shooters Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Stopping the high-rise shooter

Like most Americans, I have watched hours of TV coverage of the massacre at Las Vegas. The question that is constantly recurring in the commentaries is the wrong one: what was his motive?

Foreign Minister Sebastian Kurz, head of Austrian People's Party, smiles in Vienna, Austria, Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017, after the closing of the polling stations for the Austrian national elections. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader) ** FILE **

An Austrian thumb in the eye of the elites

- The Washington Times

The elites everywhere are having a hard time. When the peasants no longer salute, tug a forelock and obey with a whimper, even if with a snarl and a whine, you know you’ve lost your mojo.

Chart to accompany Rahn article of Oct. 17, 2017.

Schooling the U.S. on economic freedom

Once again, there is more evidence that economic freedom leads to success. Many of the former communist countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union have made enormous economic progress from the time they became free almost three decades ago.

Pope Francis acknowledges the applause of the audience after he delivered his speech during the visit to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) on the occasion of the World Food Day, Monday, Oct. 16, 2017.(AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

Pope Francis, biblically challenged, blames climate change — again

- The Washington Times

Once again, Pope Francis has pressed forward the mantra that much of the world’s problems — hunger, overrun borders — are due to man’s failures to stop wars and address climate change. This is odd, given a more biblical perspective might say, oh let’s see, wars come from evil desires and hunger, in large part, from wars.

Illustration on Richard Nixon's role in the Vietnam War by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A faulty retelling of ‘The Vietnam War’

When Richard Nixon was in the White House, I was in Vietnam and he was my commander in chief. When I was on Ronald Reagan’s National Security Council staff, I had the opportunity to brief former President Nixon on numerous occasions and came to admire his analysis of current events, insights on world affairs and compassion for our troops. His preparation for any meeting or discussion was exhaustive. His thirst for information was unquenchable and his tolerance for fools was nonexistent.

Illustration on China's designs on the electric car market by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The race for electric vehicle dominance

General Motors and Ford are scurrying to realign for what many believe are the next big things — driverless and electric vehicles (EVs) — but don’t look to Detroit, Japan or Germany for the mighty impulse that transforms personal transportation. With the world’s largest car market and savvy government policies, the advantage goes to China.

Illustration on NATO' difficult situation with member nation Turkey by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Saving NATO from Turkey

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization, known as NATO, faces an existential problem.

Vice President Mike Pence speaks on behalf of Virginia Republican gubernatorial candidate Ed Gillespie during a campaign rally at the Washington County Fairgrounds Saturday, Oct. 14, 2017, in Abingdon, Va. Establishment figure Gillespie is in a neck-and-neck race against Democratic Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam. (Andre Teague/The Bristol Herald-Courier via AP)

Trump heads, Pence tails

If a metaphor could be used for this White House, it might be a two-sided coin with President Trump as heads and Vice President Mike Pence as tails.

A Game of Political Football Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A Republican team with no offense

Is the Republican Party in trouble? The primary fight defeat in Alabama and the quick retirement signal by Sen. Bob Corker are not the only straws in the wind. Current polling shows Republicans trail Democrats by 8 percentage points in a generic 2018 House race.

Related Articles

FILE - In this Sept. 10, 2017, file photo, San Francisco 49ers safety Eric Reid (35) kneels in front of teammates during the national anthem before an NFL football game against the Carolina Panthers in Santa Clara, Calif., Sunday. Reid was an early protester during the national anthem, joining former San Francisco teammate Colin Kaepernick last season.  (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

Uniformed, but uninformed

Retaliation isn't always out of bounds. With their pre-game kneeling ritual, National Football League players have put a big hurt on their teams — and the fans — who pay their enormous salaries. Fans from coast to coast have responded with a forearm to the league's all-important TV ratings, leaving the muscled men flat on their backs, looking at the sky and wondering what hit them. The NFL is the king of sports entertainment, for now, but it's reassuring that when their favorite stars sneer at their country, Americans will still show where their hearts are.

In this Sept. 29, 2017, file photo, California Gov. Jerry Brown gestures while speaking in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, file)

Cracking down on pronouns

There's something about the Left Coast. Maybe there's something in the salt water besides the makings of taffy. California was once derided as "the land of fruit and nuts," and the nuttiness has spread northward along the coast. Just when Gov. Jerry Brown of California had outgrown his reputation as Gov. Moonbeam, he does something to reclaim it.

Charting the course of the presidency over time

Jeremi Suri, a professor of history at the University of Texas, is author/editor of eight previous books, numerous newspaper and magazine pieces, and a popular guest on television talk shows.

Medication 'motive' for shootings?

"The making of the Las Vegas murderer" (Web, Oct. 12) examines the possibility that the shooter was "radicalized." Yet earlier, the FBI, lacking any perceived motive, was asking citizens for tips that might help them find a motive. I say anyone whose mind is deranged by certain drugs doesn't need a motive. The shooter allegedly had a doctor who prescribed him Valium.

Most crushing D.C. sports loss

In his column "Meltdown all-too-familiar for Washington fans" (Web, Oct. 13) Thom Loverro ponders where the Washington Nationals' playoff loss last Thursday to the Chicago Cubs will rank "among the D.C. Sports Hall of Failures. It's hard to judge one over the other."

In this Friday, Oct. 13, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump makes a statement on Iran policy in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Donald Trump won't be impeached

- The Washington Times

Listen up, Impeach Trump crowd: President Donald Trump's not going to be impeached. He won't. So let it go. Move on -- and take your MoveOn.org money with you.

San Francisco 49ers quarterback Brian Hoyer (2) is sacked by Washington Redskins outside linebacker Preston Smith (94) and defensive tackle Matthew Ioannidis (98) during the first half of an NFL football game in Landover, Md., Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Mark Tenally)

SNYDER: Washington is doing what good teams do

Arguably the least-attractive home date before the season began, the 49ers' 0-5 record only added to the blase feelings. San Francisco should've been a gimme. But in actuality, this was a big game, as big as they come. It would've been even bigger if Washington didn't hold on for a 26-24 victory.

Washington Redskins quarterback Kirk Cousins (8) carries the ball toward the end zone a touchdown as San Francisco 49ers defensive end Solomon Thomas (94) looks on during the second half of an NFL football game in Landover, Md., Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

LOVERRO: Sunday's game adds to Shanahan's case for Cousins

Here's Kyle Shanahan's case for Kirk Cousins to come play for him next season: "Kirk, I nearly just beat your heavily favored team on the road with a kid fresh out of college who had barely stepped on an NFL football field. Imagine what the two of us can do together."