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Illustration on dealing with the rise of violent Shariaists in the U.S. after the demise of the ISIS caliphate by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Fending off ISIS and Shariah

Do I detect a note of desperation in how some of my fellow Americans discuss how to treat terrorism, specifically the Islamic State, or ISIS? ISIS has grown from a small group of brutes back in President Obama’s time committing various heinous crimes into a small army consisting of a few thousand, perhaps tens of thousands committing heinous crimes.

Illustration on the thought of Michael Lind by Linus Garsys/The Washington Times

A new role for America

If you’re puzzled by the swirl of geopolitical forces besetting the globe, and the debates unleashed by that swirl as to the nature of the world we will inherit or should inherit, then you must read Michael Lind’s cover article in the current issue of The National Interest.

Democrats New Hobby Horse Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Democrats’ sudden concern for election integrity

When the Democratic Party and its deep-state allies’ favorite anti-Trump columnist begins to sour on the promise of a Russian collusion probe, it is time to start looking for a consolation prize. Based on the overnight interest in all things voting security, they seem to have found a new hobby horse.

Intrusive Government Data Collection Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A Supreme Court call on the third party doctrine

This week, constitutional law experts and the law enforcement community were abuzz after the U.S. Supreme Court added Carpenter v. United States to its docket, a case that could reshape government data collection and the Fourth Amendment in the internet Age.

Tax Cutm Legislation Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Tax reform for the real world

There is an old adage that entrepreneurs often find to be true, and that is that things take three times as long and cost three times as you much as you thought. The Republicans claim they are going to get tax reform done this year — but this is not going to happen unless they do two necessary things.

People visit the Supreme Court in Washington, Monday, June 26, 2017, as justices issued their final rulings for the term, in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Religious rights rest in clutches of the Supreme Court

- The Washington Times

The Supreme Court of the United States agreed this week to consider whether a Denver baker violated the constitutional and civil rights of a gay couple by refusing to sell the two guys a wedding cake. Let’s hope the court sides with religious freedom on this, not special rights.

Illustration on duplication in government programs by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Unhealthy acts

Is there anyone who can point to the “Affordable Care Act” (aka Obamacare) and credibly claim it is accomplishing the goals set for it seven years ago?

Illustration on energy week by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Paving the path to U.S. energy dominance

This week, the Trump administration is hosting “Energy Week” to discuss with state, tribal, business and labor leaders how we can pave the path forward toward U.S. energy dominance.

In this Tuesday, May 23, 2017, photo, Hannah Waring, left, a student at Loudoun Valley High School, and Abby McDonough, a student at Liberty University, work in the strawberry stand at Wegmeyer Farms in Hamilton, Va. Waring and McDonough are working at Wegmeyer Farms for the summer. Summer jobs are vanishing as U.S. teens spend more time in school and face competition from older workers. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

A summer bummer for young job-seekers

On July 1, 17 states and localities will make a difficult youth summer job market even worse by raising their starter wages. These raises follow the 42 separate wage hikes that took place on New Year’s Day.

Illustration on the history of American secret operations by Alexander hunter/The Washington Times

A constant craving for intelligence

This summer marks the 40th anniversary of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, one of the first achievements of Democratic House Speaker Thomas “Tip” O’Neill in his newly elected post in 1977.

Witch Hunt Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

An investigation in search of a crime

How is this for a strategy? Concoct a conspiracy to explain an unexpected election loss, put a cloud over the head of the elected president and his agenda, drag out an investigation for months, stir up hopes of impeachment, and then charge obstruction of justice when the subject of the mudslinging attempts to clear his name.

Illustration on the decline of the FBI by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why the FBI is hard to trust

- The Washington Times

Can anyone with a modicum of common sense trust the Federal Bureau of investigation? The answer to that question is a resounding “no.” The claim that the FBI strives to be above politics is today and has always been absurd.

ACLU Legal and Policy director Rebecca Robertson talks during a news conference held by opponents of a "bathroom bill" at the Texas State Capitol, Wednesday, April 19, 2017, in Austin, Texas. The Texas House is considering a bill that's different than one that sparked outcry when it cleared the state Senate last month. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

The ACLU goes hunting in Montana

In a 1981 speech before the California Peace Officers Assn., former Attorney General Ed Meese referred to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) as a “criminals’ lobby.”

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Illustration on draining the Washington swamp by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

The high cost of waiting to drain the swamp

"Drain the swamp!" It was the battle cry of Donald Trump's presidential campaign. Many Republican members of Congress echoed that call as well, riding it to victory -- and control of both legislative chambers.

When hero worship is misplaced

Paul Hollander, professor emeritus at University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and associate of the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard, was born in Budapest and left Hungary in 1956, the year the Soviets demonstrated convincingly that they could be just as brutal as the previous occupiers, the Nazis.

Mocking demands from Pyongyang

Learning to read social cues that say a red line has been crossed is a valuable skill, and some despots never learn it. Like the abrasive oaf with a reputation as an equal opportunity offender, North Korea has signaled it wants to strike a deal with the United States. Having just sent home a young American visitor with fatal injuries, the regime is in no position to approach the U.S. with anything but an abject apology — and the release of the other three Americans still being held hostage.

President Donald Trump listens as Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi speaks in the Rose Garden at the White House, Monday, June 26, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

A limited victory for Trump

The U.S. Supreme Court didn't quite hit a home run Monday, but the justices hit a sharp double and a couple of singles that showed that there's life yet in the lineup. The president got a little help to protect the nation from terrorists, schoolyard safety was held to be as important for children in private schools as in public schools, and the court hinted that help might be on the way for a Colorado wedding-cake baker who doesn't want to join the celebration of same-sex weddings.

The left, not Trump, in bed with Russia

The Democratic National Committee computer system was easily hacked by the Russians. The personal email of the chairman of the Clinton presidential campaign was even more easily stolen by the Russians. The Obama administration apparently knew as early as last summer that the Russians were up to great mischief in trying to interfere in our presidential election -- but it was paralyzed into inaction.

A woman prays during a memorial rally for the late American student Otto Warmbier near the U.S. Embassy in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, June 23, 2017. North Korea on Friday called itself the "biggest victim" in the death of Warmbier who was detained for more than a year and died days after being released in a coma. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

Otto Warmbier 'got exactly what he deserved,' professor says

- The Washington Times

A professor of anthropology at the University of Delaware, Katherine Dettwyler, age 62, who said in a Facebook post that Otto Warmbier was a "spoiled" white boy who "got exactly what he deserved" -- imprisonment in North Korea, leading to his death -- has been fired. Good riddance. Don't let the door hit you.