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Nancy Pelosi (Associated Press)

The revolt of the peasants gathers steam

- The Washington Times

The populist saber continues to cut the elites down to size. The elites, who think they know it all and are uniquely qualified to tell everyone else how to live, took another pasting Sunday in the Italian elections. Prime Minister Matteo Renzi felt so humiliated by voter rejection of his proposals for constitutional reform that he quit on the spot.

Illustration on Chinese industrial pollution by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump’s China challenge

President Donald Trump will reject one concept and embrace another as he confronts China on trade and pollution. He expressed skepticism for “the concept of global warming created by and for the Chinese in order to make U.S. industry noncompetitive.”

Illustration on keeping military strategy secret by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

From Churchill’s lips to Trump’s ears

In the third and final presidential debate, Republican nominee Donald Trump claimed that U.S. foreign policy regularly fails to engage “the element of surprise” when it comes to engaging the Islamic State, or ISIS. According to Mr. Trump, our enemies “have all left” the Iraqi city of Mosul because ISIS was given warning months in advance.

Trucking Delivers the Holidays Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trucking delivers the holidays

Family gatherings with a delicious turkey on the table. Friends and communities joining together for holiday traditions. Stores and sidewalks bustling as we shop for presents to exchange with loved ones. Wreaths on doors and ornate decorations lighting up downtowns.

SEIU Local 1 union members protest for an increase in the minimum wage, Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016 at the Detroit Metropolitan Airport in Romulus, Mich. Fast-food restaurant and airport workers, as well as home and child-care workers rallied in cities including Chicago, Detroit, Houston, Los Angeles, Minneapolis and New York on Tuesday morning. In many cities the protesters blocked busy intersections. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

The Trump challenge to Big Labor

According to the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics, labor unions spent more than $142 million on federal candidates, parties and outside spending trying to influence the 2016 election — more than double what they spent in 2008. Even this eye-popping figure is conservative, as it doesn’t include big spending on ballot measures and other tactics to boost voter turnout.

Illustration on the Pearl Harbor attack by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Pearl Harbor, 75 years on

The 75th anniversary of the Imperial Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor will soon be remembered again as a “Day of Infamy.” On Dec. 7, 1941, Japan launched over 350 aircraft from six carriers, flawlessly executing Adm. Isoroku Yamamoto’s strike plan “Z” and succeeded in crippling the U.S. Pacific Fleet.

Champion of 'Worst Former President' Competition Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Competing for the ‘worst former president’

Like an episode of “Survivor,” pitting one generation against another, former President Jimmy Carter is vying to retain the title of our worst and most pestiferous former president against the coming challenge by President Obama.

The "Climate Science" of Pope Francis Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Pope Francis and climate politics

Reuters reports, “Pope Francis urged national leaders on Monday to implement global environmental agreements without delay, a message that looked to be squarely aimed at U.S. President-elect Donald Trump.

Ron Wyden (Associated Press)

The churls and their denial and grief

- The Washington Times

Life is not fair to losers, or the critics of Donald Trump, and the way he won the presidency. He just won’t stand still and give the rotten eggs a chance to hit their mark.

Illustration on the promotion of U.S. trade by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump’s nationalism will preserve international stability

Economists and foreign policy experts fear Donald Trump’s economic nationalism will disrupt the global institutions that have fostered international economic cooperation and security for seven decades and instigate chaos.

The selection of Betsy DeVos to run the Department of Education was likely an easy call for President-elect Donald Trump, who during the campaign regularly championed school choice and the charter school movement, giving a nod to school choice when announcing his pick. (Associated Press)

The administration billionaires

President-elect Donald Trump and his Cabinet nominees won’t be in office until next month, but the stock market is already showing bullish signs of better days ahead under his pro-growth, tax reform agenda.

Putting Off the Congo Elections Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The dangers of a hasty Congo election

The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has been the target of criticism in recent weeks with editorials in major newspapers calling on our president to step down.

Illustration of John Bolton by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘The man with the bushy moustache’

President-elect Donald Trump would be best served by selecting a secretary of State who understands the national security challenges our country faces, can literally “hit the ground running,” has a proven track record of successful negotiations, and most importantly, not only protects but projects the greatest attributes about America’s ideals of freedom and democracy.

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Illustration on the anticipated retransformation of America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Much to look forward to

I was going to write today about the ongoing, insanely angry reactions by media, academics and students to the calamity that befell them on Nov. 8. There's just so much out there.

Recount pushers shameless

Well, sometimes the conspiracy theorists are right. I just learned that in the most liberal county of Wisconsin, the 2016 presidential vote recount is being done by hand. This is being done deliberately to delay certification.

Rep. Louie Gohmert, R-Texas, talks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Jan. 9, 2015, following a closed-door meeting with House Republicans to counter President Barack Obama's executive actions on immigration. The plan emerging Friday satisfies demands from the most conservative lawmakers and goes further than the approach initially discussed by some House Republicans. Many of the same House conservatives who voted against Boehner for speaker earlier this week in a failed overthrow attempt led by Gohmert, were declaring victory Friday at the shape the immigration legislation was taking.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Blowing smoke, preferable hickory

Congress last week finally turned to something genuinely important, when Rep. Louie Gohmert of Texas blistered the Architect of the Capitol, the caretaker of the government's buildings on Capitol Hill, for interfering with the preparation of his barbecued ribs.

Illustration on John Bolton for Secretary of State by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Naming a secretary of state

- The Washington Times

President-elect Donald Trump is having a heckuva time deciding on who to nominate as secretary of State. It began with former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani's insistence that he wanted and deserves the job as payback for the yeoman work he did for candidate Trump when many leading Republicans were, shall we say, less than enthusiastic in their support of his fellow New Yorker.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Absolutely on Music: Conversations with Seiji Ozawa'

Probably the two best-known Japanese cultural figures in the west are conductor Seiji Ozawa and novelist Haruki Murakami, so the very idea of listening in on their conversations entices -- the more so since Haruki Murakami invariably evokes music in his novels.

In this Sunday, Nov. 13, 2016, photo, a U.S. Customs and Border Patrol agents pass a section of border wall in Hidalgo, Texas. The idea of a concrete wall spanning the entire 1,954-mile southwest frontier collides head-on with multiple realities, like a looping Rio Grande, fierce local resistance, and cost. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

Hell on the border

Barack Obama's legacy, intended or not, is the hell on the border that he invited and nurtures. The crisis is darker than ever, and the Obama administration seems only to know how to make it worse.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif., speaks to reporters following the House Democratic Caucus elections on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016, for House leadership positions. Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, challenged Pelosi, but lost, 134-63. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Still out of step

"I have a special spring in my step today," Rep. Nancy Pelosi exulted on being re-elected leader of the Democratic minority, "because this opportunity is a special one, to lead the House Democrats, bring everyone together as we go forward."