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The Hillary Effect on Women Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton’s problem with women

Two weeks before the election, Hillary Clinton appears on track to win the presidency and become the first female commander in chief. She can credit her surge in the polls this last month to women — primarily her opponent’s offensive comments unearthed from a decade ago and the various accusations that have suddenly surfaced and have dominated the media.

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton greets supporters following a "Get out the vote," rally at Curtis Hixon Waterfront Park, Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016 in downtown Tampa, Fla. (Loren Elliot/Tampa Bay Times via AP)

Hillary’s anti-transparency bargain

President Obama recently condemned the Republican Party, claiming that its “central principle” is to suppress voting. But, while his administration piously pledges to protect voting rights, it has almost guaranteed that Americans will be blindfolded on Election Day. While the Justice Department will deploy election monitors at polls in 25 states, no one watched Uncle Sam.

Illustration on NATO fiscal responsibility by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A threadbare alliance

Historians and political scientists commonly describe the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) as the most effective military alliance in contemporary history. It was the bond between the United States and Western Europe that helped contribute to the decline and eventual collapse of the Soviet Union.

Illustration on the 2016 campaign by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why Donald Trump is still the safer choice

America is a two-party system and after party conventions select the nominees, we have two choices and only two choices. Both nominees have demonstrated serious character flaws. The current spotlight is on lewd, vulgar comments from Donald Trump that cannot be defended. Nevertheless, his words could never be used to justify a vote for Hillary Clinton and her leftist agenda.

Donald Trump arrives at a Trump rally at Sanford Orlando International Airport in Sanford, Fla., Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016. Trump is pledging to bolster the government's investment in the space program, a boon to the Space Coast of Florida. (Stephen M. Dowell/Orlando Sentinel via AP)

The staying power of populism

Despite evidence from the 2016 presidential campaign, doubts dominate about populism’s ability to win America’s ultimate prize. “It can’t happen here” is as wrong as the political establishment’s misreading of the populist movement itself. Populism’s history here and abroad argues a populist triumph could eventually occur — if not this November, then soon.

Missile Attack Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Iran’s proxy missile attacks

The recent missile attacks attributed to Yemeni Houthi rebels, with assistance from the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) and Hezbollah, demonstrate Iran’s classic use of proxies to promote its political agenda. The Houthi rebels denied any involvement in the missile attacks.

Illustration on non-voters by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

In defense of the nonvoter

Between now and Nov. 8, Americans will be inundated with good-intentioned public service announcements urging them to take the time to vote. And to buttress that argument, statistics about the usual low turnout rate — about 60 percent or so — will suggest that this American trend is somehow illustrative of a major defect in the body politic.

John Podsesta (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The coming media settlement with Hillary

- The Washington Times

There’s no one more repentant and eager to promise reform than the town drunk coming off a week at the bottom of a bottle. Some of “the top political reporters in the country,” as they think of themselves, will be soon looking for similar redemption.

The Tail Wagging the Middle East Dog Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Mistaking the cause of Middle East turmoil

President Obama might sandbag Israel in pursuit of something Palestinian leadership rejects — peace with the Jewish state. The blow reportedly may fall in the interregnum between the Nov. 8 election and the Jan. 20 inauguration of the next president.

Illustration on human trafficking and open borders by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The other open-borders commodity

Some proponents of the current open borders policy also claim to be defenders of women’s rights. It is, therefore, supremely ironic that one unintended consequence of open borders is a substantial spike in sex trafficking of young girls. That’s the major takeaway of a trip to South Texas earlier this month.

Illustration on Hillary's support of partial birth abortion by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Reconsider ‘Never Trump’

While Democrats perpetually circle the wagons, Republicans engage a perpetual circular firing squad. The same holds true for many evangelicals. Democrats and secularists count on it.

Britney Corbett oversees a ninth-grade math at Washington Leadership Academy in Northeast D.C. The technology-focused high school charter, which opened its doors in August, teaches students the basics and how to write computer code and use drones. (Julia Porterfield/The Washington Times)

Black students matter

Money talks and the NAACP walks away from its mission to ensure educational equality for black kids.

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Guterres fit to replace Ban

In his Oct. 11 op-ed "Ready for the U.N.'s top post?" Brett D. Schaefer is ill-informed about Portuguese Prime Minister Antonio Guterres, who was the head of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees for more than a decade.

Consequences of shunning Trump

Many Republicans are turning away from supporting Donald Trump, and many do so fearing that his election will lead to the end of the Republican Party as it existed before Mr. Trump. Are they blind to what could happen if he loses?

A voter marks a ballot for the New Hampshire primary inside a voting booth on Feb. 9 in Manchester, N.H. (Associated Press)

Get 'em where they eat

It's always for the kids. Every time a local government wants more money from taxpayers, the taxpayers are told that it's not for lavish salaries or programs of limited value, but "for the kids." It's for schools, teachers, first-aid kits, fire extinguishers and stuff like that.

US attorney general, Loretta E. Lynch attends a conference on organised crime in Rome, Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

Counting up the carnage

Putting on a blue uniform has seldom been this hard. Thugs and killers have always despised the men and women who keep the peace, but now their bosses often no longer have their backs. When the badge is bent out of shape to suit the times, civility slides toward the ragged edge of barbarism.

Illustration on the results of defeating the Islamic State by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Battle of Mosul

Ayman al-Zawahiri was correct. Believed to be ensconced in the tribal lands of Pakistan, the leader of what's sometimes called al Qaeda Central has dedicated his life to a jihad that he hopes and prays will lead to the founding of a new and mighty Islamic empire. But he understands the value of strategic patience.

Donald Trump gestures toward Hillary Clinton during the third presidential debate Wednesday in Las Vegas. (Associated Press)

Bursting the limits to growth

"What's in your wallet?" is more than a punchline in a TV commercial. It's the question that breadwinners ask themselves every day. How they answer determines whether they're gaining or losing ground in the race for prosperity.

JIM BUNNING-The MLB pitcher was U.S. Senator from the state of Kentucky. Hall of Famer Jim Bunning is seen during the Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremony on Sunday, July 28, 2013, in Cooperstown, N.Y. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)

A sad note in World Series Week

This week millions of Americans, including political junkies who are sometimes more passionate about baseball than politics (particularly after a nip or two of fine old Kentucky bourbon in the shank of an evening with old friends), will interrupt their arguing over the occasional merits and manifold shortcomings of Hillary and the Donald, to retire to the sport pages and the World Series.

Where are the Bushes?

Where are the Bushes during this election cycle? Why have they apparently been silent, and whom does their silence benefit? Let's remember which party they belonged to when they ran and got elected. The family comprises two former presidents of the United States and one former governor of Florida, and today their voices are absent. Jeb Bush even promised to support the chosen GOP candidate.

Consider cap on election spending

I cannot wait until this election is over. Hillary Clinton lied to the FBI and the American people, using a private email server in her home for State Department business. WikiLeaks divulged how some Clinton supporters were paid to disrupt Donald Trump's campaign events.

Election Season Dirty Tricks Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Dirty tricks: Then and now

Students of the Watergate era (or those old enough to have lived through it) will recall the "dirty tricks" played by Richard Nixon's henchmen, most notably Donald Segretti. Mr. Segretti, who was hired by Nixon's deputy assistant, Dwight Chapin, was tasked with smearing Democrats, including 1972 presidential candidate Sen. Edmund Muskie of Maine.