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President-elect Donald Trump, left, and his wife Melania Trump arrive to the "Make America Great Again Welcome Concert" at the Lincoln Memorial, Thursday, Jan. 19, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

A hearty last laugh for the Donald

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump’s greatest contribution to America will be his stripping the media, particularly the overpaid and undereducated television media, of its last pretense to fairness and objectivity.

Russian President Vladimir Putin takes part in the launching ceremony of Bovanenkovo-Ukhta 2 gas pipeline and the Zapolyarye-Purpe and Kuyumba-Taishet oil pipelines via video link in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017. (Alexei Druzhinin/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

The Trump-Putin friendship

As President-elect Donald Trump prepares to take office today, yet another nominee in his forthcoming Cabinet is staking out sharp differences with his views on foreign policy.

Classified Dossier Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Democrats’ ‘dossier’

The recent intelligence report on Russian interference in the election concluded that the Russian government was behind the hacking and release of Democratic emails. The assumed purpose of these activities was an effort to support the candidacy of Donald Trump, even though the report acknowledged that the Russian government believed Hillary Clinton was likely to win the election anyway.

Texas Power Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The power of Rick Perry

As former energy secretaries in a Republican and Democratic administration, we can say with complete confidence that President-elect Donald Trump has made an excellent choice in nominating Rick Perry to be secretary of energy. From our perspective, Mr. Perry has precisely the background, skill set and vision needed to effectively oversee the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and guide the nation’s energy strategies.

Prospects for the EPA Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Pruitt is right for the EPA

Of all the ways the outgoing Obama administration has waged war on the private sector, nothing has been as deeply felt as the economically harmful actions taken by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer speaks at a recent news conference Monday, May 23, 2016, regarding a new ordinance for the city regarding drugs in San Diego.  Faulconer's low-key style has gone down well with voters after the high drama of a predecessor who resigned and pleaded guilty to a felony for harassing women. The Republican leader is a heavy favorite to win a second term as mayor of the nation's eighth-largest city. (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi)

Making America’s cities great again

The historic, controversial presidential election of 2016 is now behind us. The people decided. Now comes the hard part, governing. As usually happens after a presidential campaign, serious, talented individuals come forth to help. There is something magical about contributing to a new federal administration, a chance to effect change across America.

FILE - In this May 10, 2016, file photo, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un waves at parade participants at the Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea. North Korea is marking Kim Jong Un's birthday Sunday, Jan. 8, 2017 in a decidedly low-key manner. Though the young leader's birthday is well-known throughout the country, it has yet to be celebrated with the kind of adulatory festivities that accompany the birthdays of his late grandfather and father. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E, File)

China’s boost to North Korean nukes

Allowing North Korea to make consistent progress toward the fielding of a nuclear-armed intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) capable of reaching most American cities can be considered President Obama’s most serious failure in national security and non-proliferation.

Washington’s chance to reform the status quo

The United States is a great nation, but we face many serious challenges that need to be addressed. Two key ones relate to the need to ensure fiscal sustainability and achieve government transformation. As a recognized expert in these areas, I have several thoughts that I believe President-elect Donald Trump needs to consider.

Obama’s betrayal of the Cuban people

I couldn’t have imagined that President Obama could do any more harm to the Cuban people before he left office, but I was wrong. With only a week left in his presidency he announced that the long-standing policy of accepting Cubans that flee the Communist island of Cuba by sea — the policy known as “wet feet, dry feet” — would change.

U.N. Deal Deniers Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

That parting shot at Israel

According to well-established sources in Egyptian Intelligence Services, a Palestinian Authority (PA) delegation met in Washington D.C. with officials from the outgoing Obama administration for secret talks. Secretary of State John Kerry and National Security Adviser Susan Rice were present.

Elephant With Two Pyramids Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A plea for ‘tart reform’

There’s an elephant in the middle of the emergency room, but we’re too busy arguing about Obamacare to see him.

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Protestors gather for a march on the Capitol Building as preparations continue ahead of the presidential inauguration, Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

A tantrum for the Inaugural

No one likes to lose, but the sweet taste of victory makes the risk worth it. In the race to become the 45th president of the United States, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump put everything on the line, and Hillary lost. She seems to be taking it as a grown-up must, but the sting of defeat has been too much for many of the Democrats, and legions of them promise to disrupt Friday's Inauguration Day festivities.

FILE - In this undated file photo provided by the U.S. Army, Pfc. Chelsea Manning poses for a photo wearing a wig and lipstick. On Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017, President Barack Obama commuted the sentence of Chelsea Manning, who leaked Army documents and is serving 35 years. (U.S. Army via AP, File)

Undeserved mercy for Chelsea Manning

The difference between real life, where most Americans live, and life inside the bubble, as President Obama described the place where many Democrats fled to, has never been illustrated more vividly than in the commutation of the sentence of Chelsea (nee Bradley) Manning, who was serving 35 years in prison for betraying her country.

Ryan's immigration betrayal

House Speaker Paul Ryan has seen fit to fire a shot across the president-elect's bow regarding illegal immigrants ("Paul Ryan rules out Donald Trump's 'deportation force,'" Web, Jan. 12). He's a traitor to his party and to all the Democrats and Republicans who voted for Donald Trump.

New college course needed

The strong support of Sen. Bernie Sanders among college students in the recent presidential campaign shows a dreadful lack of economic understanding. Therefore I strongly suggest a new college course be created: "The Economics of Venezuela."

BOOK REVIEW: 'Just Another Jihadi Jane'

Over the last few years the western press has been regularly punctuated by accounts of young Islamic people who have left their American or European homes to take up arms in the sea of struggles in the Middle East. Some have achieved notoriety for their savage actions; some have died, and some have simply disappeared.

Angels Coming Together Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The 'better angels' under siege

One circus closes, another comes to town. Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey, "the greatest show on Earth," is striking the big top for good, and has sent its elephants -- who looked like they enjoyed the attention -- to an assisted-living home for pachyderms. But the elephant lives on T-shirts, hats, caps and banners decorating the nation's capital this week.

Education Quality Harmed by the Teachers Union Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trying a different way

Some years ago a friend of mine wrote a book titled "The Seven Last Words of the Church, or, We've Never Tried It That Way Before." It is about what he regarded as the entrenched bureaucracies in his denomination that are reluctant -- even hostile -- to change.

In this Jan. 12, 2017 photo, Attorney General Loretta Lynch poses for a portrait during an interview with The Associated Press at the University of Baltimore School of Law in Baltimore. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

A parting shot at personal freedom

On Jan. 3, outgoing Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch secretly signed an order directing the National Security Agency (NSA) -- America's 60,000-person-strong domestic spying apparatus -- to make available raw spying data to all other federal intelligence agencies, which then can pass it on to their counterparts in foreign countries and in the 50 states upon request.

Ruin often precedes change

After World War II, the two countries whose governments were totally destroyed by the war — Germany and Japan — were the two countries which, upon rebuilding to new order, succeeded best economically.

President-elect Donald Trump speaks during the presidential inaugural Chairman's Global Dinner, Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Making sense of what's happening

Inauguration Day begins a new chapter in the story of America every four years, and the story of the republic thus never grows stale. This time, however, the fresh page is marred with fake and bizarre news before a single accurate word is written. Russian hacking reports, secret dossiers and news of what happens when a president tries to lead from behind overwhelm the senses and challenge the ability to make heads or tails of it all.

Deal with it: Trump won

When are the anti-Trump folks going to get it? They should pay attention and heed the words of outgoing Vice President Joe Biden: It's over. Stop all the talk about how the Russians influenced the election.

Obama woefully unprepared

Throughout the eight years of the Obama presidency my wife and I have disagreed on the president's abilities. I believed the president was reasonably intelligent but because of his upbringing as an anti-colonialist he did not have the pride in America that drives most successful citizens of this great country.

President Barack Obama holds up a personalized Chicago Cubs baseball jersey presented to him for a group photo during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Monday, Jan. 16, 2017, where the president honored the 2016 World Series Champion baseball team. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Obama, baseball and the numbers

Barack Obama was a deprived child, and it shows. Born on an island in the middle of an ocean and raised in Indonesia, little Barack never had the opportunity to absorb the juice and electricity of America. He grooved on the evening call to Muslim prayer, which he called "the prettiest sound on earth," but never learned the rousing words and music of "Take Me Out to the Ball Game."