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Donald Trump confounds the Gaffe Patrol

- The Washington Times

The Japanese Zero was one of the most famous fighter planes in the South Pacific, bedeviling American pilots in the early days of World War II. The Zero was quick and nimble, darting from the clouds to inflict death and mayhem, and the Zero hit many a target.

Culture and Tradition of the Silk Road Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Tracing the modern Silk Road

This week the Johns Hopkins University in Washington is hosting a major regional conference on the historic Silk Road. The “Trans-Caspian East-West Trade & Transit Corridor” event co-hosted by the embassies of Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan and Turkey brings together officials from the United States and the region with over 50 major international companies and academic leaders to brainstorm the strengthening of regional integration.

Artist's rendering of the Haymarket Square explosion.

Now it’s May Day every day

One hundred years ago Sunday (May 1, 1916) the “greatest strike of laboring men in the history of the United States” took place, according to a front-page story in the Washington [D. C.] Herald newspaper. Some two million workers struck on May Day, far outdistancing the strife that typified the late-19th century when the day was a code word for industrial violence. The Haymarket Square protest in Chicago in the wake of strikes on May Day 1886 was the most notorious, with a bomb explosion that killed 11 and wounded more than a hundred.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign stop at Old National Events Plaza, Thursday, April 28, 2016, in Evansville, Ind. (Denny Simmons/Evansville Courier & Press via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

The final rebuke of Donald Trump

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump has a shot at reconfiguring the electoral map — putting traditionally blue states like Pennsylvania and Wisconsin into play, with his working-class, industrial appeal.

House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis. responds to a question from the audience during a town hall at Gaston Hall at Georgetown University in Washington, Wednesday, April 27, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Renegotiating Puerto Rico’s debt and Trumpian anger

A majority of Americans aren’t enthusiastic about a potential President Trump. Nonetheless, anger with the political establishment about political games and backroom deals, about insiders’ arrogance, and about fear that taxpayers will end up largely being saddled with the costs of these antics seems to be a driving force behind the pro-Trump movement.

A Trump forerunner who met the challenge of racial equality

Many conservatives and Republicans across the country are worried about the possibility that their presidential nominee could be Donald Trump, a man who initially dithered over rejecting the support of former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke, someone who has routinely retweeted hateful words from white supremacists.

Anti-abortion activists rally in Austin, Texas, to condemn the use in medical research of tissue samples obtained from aborted fetuses. (Associated Press)

Planned Parenthood’s fetal parts practices

Planned Parenthood, a vastly profitable, tax-subsidized consortium that performs more than 300,000 abortions a year, is the target of five different congressional investigations. Last September its president, Cecile Richards, categorically denied accusations by the House Oversight Committee that the organization profits from the sale of fetal tissue.

Share the Neighborhood Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Mr. Rogers Doctrine

Barack Obama last week visited Saudi Arabia, an unusual nation with which the United States has had a relationship that can be accurately characterized as both strategic and strange — and one that is now severely strained. To understand how we got to this juncture requires at least a smattering of modern history.

Trump Campaign Reboot Button Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Donald Trump and the art of the reboot

It’s a good thing for Donald Trump that he got a boost from the recent primary in his home state of New York, because otherwise, he had a rough few weeks. He damaged his credibility as a candidate by making a string of confusing and ill-advised statements about punishing women who have an abortion and expressing scant concern about nuclear proliferation

Lead, follow or get out of the way

The terror attacks in Paris of just five months ago brought to the fore the following question: Is it going to take the equivalent of the Paris bombings here before President Obama takes decisive action against the Islamic State? After the attacks in Brussels, the question is now more relevant. The president has yet to act decisively against the Islamic State.

Artificially Inflated GDP Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The high cost of subsidized credit

The global economy is sick and its central bank doctors risk making it sicker. There has been a steady worldwide march toward cheaper credit, in hopes of resuscitating lagging growth. However, this treatment threatens a twofold risk: encouraging moral hazard in the short run and harming the market mechanism in the long run.

Related Articles

Fruit of the Poisonous Tree Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Fruit of the poisonous tree

Would all of our lives be safer if the government could break down all the doors it wishes, listen to all the conversations it could find and read whatever emails and text messages it could acquire? Perhaps. But who would want to live in such a society?

Interaction Between God and Politics Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

God and politics reconsidered

LOUISVILLE - Religion and politics are again at the forefront of this year's presidential race. Yet, in this campaign, self-described evangelicals don't seem as concerned as they once were about a candidate's personal faith.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel briefs the media after a visit at Germany's Joint Terrorism Defense Center GATZ (Gemeinsames Terrorismusabwehrzentrum), in Berlin, Tuesday, April 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber, Pool)

Nothing for the Europeans

Angela Merkel, Germany's long-serving chancellor, speaks carefully with Teutonic precision. In her conversations with President Obama on his visit to Britain and Europe she spoke with a certain plaintive tone, seeking reassurance that America hasn't really withdrawn from the leadership on which Europe has relied for 75 years.

When Britain can't be Britain

President Obama on Friday at a press conference with British Prime Minister David Cameron convinced me whether or not the British should stay in the European Union. The vote is on June 23. On Friday our president also penned a column in the Daily Telegraph, Britain's equivalent of The Washington Times and The Wall Street Journal.

Cruz-Kasich alliance will fail

Fox News host Megyn Kelly tried to knee-cap Donald Trump at the first Republican debate with her very first question. Since then the erstwhile Republican establishment (yes, Megyn, that would include you) have deployed every tactic, dirty trick, sleight of hand and Machiavellian scheme at its disposal to try to derail the Trump funicular as it chugs inexorably toward the top.

Two-party system a failure

This election season we have seen that the Republican and Democratic parties no longer provide the United States a valuable service, assuming they ever did. The Democrats have offered us the most dishonest, least trustworthy, most openly avaricious, most judgmentally challenged candidate for the presidency — possibly in the history of the United States. Yet they support her for no better reason than that she is a Democrat.

Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington on June 10, 2015. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Obamacare on the skids

Names identify people, places and things, but sometimes, particularly in politics, a name can be a disguise. After six years, the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, has been fully unmasked. It's clearly not affordable, either for a person seeking health insurance, companies that sell insurance coverage, or the U.S. government. It's a telling symbol of President Obama's dysfunctional leadership.