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Huey P. Long (Associated press)

Here comes the judge

- The Washington Times

Neil Gorsuch took the best shots, such as they were, of disheartened, dismayed and despondent Democrats this week, and nobody laid a glove on him. He was as fresh when it was over as when the slugging, such as it was, began.

Working Together to Stop Nuclear Terror Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The growing threat of nuclear terrorism

The greatest challenge to global security is the nuclear threat from rogue states, led by North Korea and Iran. There will be no progress in ensuring global nuclear stability without cooperation between the United States and Russia. This should be a major priority for Presidents Trump and Putin. Much has been made of states trying to secure their borders against terrorist threats. While it is essential that borders are secured, terrorism is tackled and hatred confronted, we cannot ignore the greatest contemporary threat of all, nuclear attacks. It feels remote and unlikely, but is a very clear and present danger.

Social warriors, sometimes

- The Washington Times

Rape stories, when they can be used to vault social-justice issues into the nation’s psyche, get exhaustive coverage and opining by the mainstream media, regardless of whether they’re even true.

Refugee Comparison Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Promoting unrestricted immigration with a false equivalent

President Trump has issued a modified version of his previous immigration policy executive order that was stalled six weeks ago by a federal judge in the state of Washington. Mr. Trump has been under relentless attack from those on the left against his efforts to limit immigration from terrorist-producing areas and his call for comprehensive vetting and background checks. Beyond doubt, it is the first and most important duty of a president to protect the lives of a country’s citizens, especially where a possibility exists of terrorists being embedded within a particular immigration flow. As the president previously stated, to not strictly enforce our immigration laws is “not compassion but recklessness.”

President Trump listens as Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi speaks during a meeting in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. In an eventful week of politics, Mr. Trump will need to restore his credibility so he can handle the next crisis, says Matt Mackowiak. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

President Trump will need to rebuild his credibility for the next crisis

While President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee held up superbly under long days of confirmation hearings questioning, and the administration and the House GOP leadership furiously worked to assemble votes for the Obamacare replacement bill, the scene at Monday’s House Intelligence Committee hearing verged on the truly incredible.

Illustration on the Class of '21 by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Class of ‘21, in hot pursuit of their Brave New World

The college Class of ‘21 is racing with caught breath and trembling fingers to check their email, pick up their snail mail, and steel themselves to read those college acceptance and rejection letters. Many schools have already dispatched congrats and regrets to thousands of applicants, and the Ivies still have a week to go before they put their letters in the mail.

Illegal Voter Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

From Free State to sanctuary state

- The Washington Times

Maryland is quite a place. The state’s voters elected a Republican governor in 2014, but control remains in the hands of the same “progressives” who enjoy veto-proof majorities in both houses of the legislature on most issues. They vote as if former Gov. and presidential wannabe Martin O’Malley is still ruling the roost in Annapolis.

Henry Sanchez, 18, is one of the students charged with rape. (Associated Press)

Maryland’s ‘safe’ environment

A rough translation of Maryland’s state motto is “Strong Deeds, Gentle Words.” In the case of a 14-year-old girl who was recently raped and sodomized in a restroom at Rockville High School by two males students, both immigrants, one facing a deportation hearing, that motto in practice has been reversed.

Illustration on the confirmation of Neil Gorsuch by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

When politicians judge jurists

I have spent this past week watching the Senate Judiciary Committee interrogating U.S. Circuit Judge Neil Gorsuch. Judge Gorsuch is President Trump’s nominee to fill the vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Military Buildup House of Cards Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The dangers of loose talk about winning wars

On several occasions, President Trump has exclaimed that America would start “winning” its wars again. Although these seemingly sensible announcements had a pleasing resonance among the many, it overlooked the obligations of serious strategic analysis.

Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 22, 2017, during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Democrats’ blinkered look at Gorsuch

There was a remarkable exchange between Sen. Dianne Feinstein, ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, and Judge Neil Gorsuch, President Trump’s nominee to replace Justice Scalia on the Supreme Court, during Tuesday’s confirmation hearing.

Illustration on Kim's North Korea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump’s pivot to North Korea

America can do anything but America can’t do everything, at least not within a four-year time frame. That suggests that the American president — any American president — needs to prioritize.

Illustration of Chuck Brunie by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Chuck Brunie, an investor exemplar

What are more important to the health of an intellectual movement, writers and academics or investors and philanthropists? That thought occurred to me when I was informed of the death of Chuck Brunie, the former longtime chairman of the board of the Manhattan Institute and the chairman emeritus of The American Spectator.

Related Articles

Illustration on allying with Russia to defeat ISIS by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Cooling the anti-Russia hysteria

The start of House Intelligence Committee hearings on Russian efforts to influence the 2016 election revealed starkly different partisan agendas. Republicans want to know who criminally leaked classified information for political purposes, culminating in the political assassination of former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn. It is clear as a matter of established fact that such leaks took place.

Stand up to Turkey

Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu's "Turkey's Vision for Cyprus" (Web, March 19) represents nothing but transparent, shameful, official propaganda of the government of Turkey. It is a dismal effort to justify Turkey's ongoing, brutal military aggression against Cyprus (including invasion, occupation, colonization, forcible division, ethnic cleansing, massive violations of human rights, destruction of cultural property, attempted secession, usurpation of property and more).

What Huck did after he headed West

It's hard to imagine a gutsier move by a novelist than to take up where Mark Twain left off. "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" is about as seminal a work of fiction as we have in our literary history.

At Mar-a-Lago, back Taiwan

After the White House announced that a meeting between President Donald Trump and his Chinese counterpart, Xi Jinping, was in the works, speculations from scholars came in quickly, especially regarding the possibility of Trump and Xi signing a fourth U.S.-China communique. Even in Taipei there is an extremely high degree of anxiety about this summit, slated for Mar-a-Lago next month.

Supervisor Hillary Ronen speaks at a rally outside of City Hall in San Francisco, Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017. President Donald Trump moved aggressively to tighten the nation's immigration controls Wednesday, signing executive actions to jumpstart construction of his promised U.S.-Mexico border wall and cut federal grants for immigrant-protecting "sanctuary cities." (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

Safe space for the law-abiding

News good and bad travels quickly. Donald Trump pledged to secure the southern border, and thousands of prospective illegal immigrants began reconsidering their travel plans. Even before President Trump has had time to roll up the welcome mat put out by his predecessor, the number of illegals crossing into the United States has fallen dramatically.

From left, House Budget Committee Chair Diane Black, R-Tenn., House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Greg Walden, R-Ore., Rep. John Yarmuth, D-Ky., the Budget Committee ranking member, House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, Rep. Richard Neal, D-Mass., the ranking member of Ways and Means, and Rep. Frank Pallone, D-N.J., the ranking member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, gather in the House Rules Committee as the panel shapes the final version of the Republican health care bill before it goes to the floor for debate and a vote, at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, March 22, 2017. House Rules Committee Chairman Pete Sessions, R-Texas, sits at top center. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Feeding the garbage can

The Senate did the right thing this month when it voted to discard the Obama administration rules that would have increased federal standards for the training of teachers in elementary and secondary schools.

An attacker is treated by emergency services outside the Houses of Parliament London, Wednesday, March 22, 2017.  London police say they are treating a gun and knife incident at Britain's Parliament "as a terrorist incident until we know otherwise." The Metropolitan Police says in a statement that the incident is ongoing. It is urging people to stay away from the area. Officials say a man with a knife attacked a police officer at Parliament and was shot by officers. Nearby, witnesses say a vehicle struck several people on the Westminster Bridge.  (Stefan Rousseau/PA via AP).

London terror and the Islam elephant in the room

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump, reacting to the Wednesday terror attack in London by the Houses of Parliament, called it "big news," but withheld further comment, pending more information. And the information we're all waiting -- albeit quietly, because it's not politically correct to bring it up openly and bluntly -- is simply this: Is this another case of Islamic terrorism?

Women burn a mock American flag with the portrait of U.S. President Donald Trump during a rally at the U.S. Embassy to mark International Women's Day Wednesday, March 8, 2017 in Manila, Philippines. Women all over the world mark the women's day with rallies and protests to highlight the role of women in society. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

U.N., post-Trump, tries hand at banning speech

- The Washington Times

The United Nations, ahead of its global celebration of the International Day for Elimination of Racial Discrimination, sent out a press release putting forth the notion that free speech is good -- free speech is necessary. But free speech has its limits. In other words: The First Amendment needs to be reeled in.

Fighting crime with Jesus

- The Washington Times

A Chicago pastor, Jon Kelly, tired of seeing kids raised in crime and violence turn around and perpetuate the cycle with their own acts of criminality, has taken his prison past, his theology studies and a dose of good ol' boldness in God and headed to the streets -- taking over drug dealers' corners and setting up "Jesus Saves" shop. This is how it's done, folks.