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United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon is joined by Somali President Hassan Sheikh Mohamoud during a high level meeting on Somalia at U.N. headquarters, Monday, Sept. 28, 2015. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

When world leaders got garbage for lunch

- The Washington Times

They gave the world leaders, in town for the opening session of the United Nations, lunch in New York the other day and all they got was swill. The leaders munching on the people’s dime said a good time was had by all, but that’s only if your taste runs to garbage. The chefs cheerfully conceded that that garbage was what it was.

Illustration on the changing and perilous situation of presidential candidates by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How the election revolution has arrived

Apolitical revolution is taking place in America. The process of selecting party presidential candidates has been transformed in the last two or three election cycles. Now we have the early debates designed to drive poll numbers and tell us who’s “ahead” and who’s “behind,” who’s “gaining” and who’s “dropping.”

Illustration on merging health insurance providers by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Proving their medicine is a good as their perks

The planned mergers of four of America’s largest health insurers — Anthem with Cigna, and Aetna with Humana — has triggered a vigorous debate in academic and policy circles.

Illustration on National Manufacturing Day by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Celebrating manufacturing

This morning when you looked at your calendar, you probably didn’t realize that today (Friday) is Manufacturing Day. Even though it’s not a national holiday (no, you don’t get to stay home from work), this day is still noteworthy.

Illustration on the increasingly dangerous international situation developing in Syria by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

Pursuing contradictory goals

The Russian intervention in Syria is straight out of a Cold War nightmare, conceivably even a countdown to Armageddon updated for the 21st century. Such “Mideast contingencies” were constant focal points of war-games that often recurred during my 30-year military career.

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy of Calif., pauses as he speaks about foreign policy during the John Hay Initiative, Monday, Sept. 28, 2015, at a hotel in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) ** FILE **

Kevin McCarthy revisits Benghazi

When House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy blurted out on Fox News September 30 that: “Everybody thought Hillary Rodham Clinton was unbeatable, right? But we [the Republicans] put together a Benghazi special committee, a select committee.

Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks as he heads a meeting of the Presidential Council for Civil Society and Human Rights at the Alexadrovsky Hall in the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015. (Yuri Kochetkov/Pool photo via AP)

Now Russia turns to Syria

Russia’s daring entry into the Syrian war is Vladimir Putin’s riskiest move yet to challenge the West, especially President Obama, after he got away with murder in eastern Ukraine.

Illustration on Pope Francis' U.S. visit by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Papal burnout

Unpopular though it may be to say so, I, for one, grew exhausted by the nonstop pronouncements and commentaries of Pope Francis. The spiritual leader of 1 billion Catholics — roughly half of the world’s Christians — Francis just completed a high-profile, endlessly publicized visit to the United States.

Illustration on China's coverup of it's abuses in Tibet by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Forgotten Tibet

Chinese leader Xi Jinping’s state dinner at the White House last week received fulsome coverage — about the fashion, the food and tech giants in attendance.

Illustration contrasting Democrat and GOP views of the presidency by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Love and hate for big government

The two parties’ differing views of big government explain their differing challenges in winning the 2016 presidential election.

Illustration on the dangerous void left by America's leadership vacuum in world affairs by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A rush to fill the power vacuum

For every nuanced policy argument over isolationism versus interventionism, the unavoidable truth — however unpleasant it may be — is this: If the United States is not the world’s foremost power, someone else will be.

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Illustration on the Putin kleptocracy in Russia by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

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