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(Image courtesy of thestar.com).

Life’s a scream on the slippery slope

- The Washington Times

“The slippery slope” doesn’t frighten very many people in Washington because that’s where a lot of politicians live. Life can be comfortable there, and it’s usually quite profitable. But it’s a dangerous piece of real estate for the rest of us.

There’s good news about third-party candidates

The conventional wisdom is that an independent presidential bid by New York billionaire Donald Trump would harm the Republican candidate in 2016. That’s probably incorrect. Most often, significant independent general-election candidacies harm the incumbent or incumbent party more than they do the challenging party.

Illustration contrasting Reagan's dealings with the Soviets and Obama's with Iran by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘Barack Obama, you’re no Ronald Reagan’

In a recent interview defending the proposed nuclear agreement with Iran, President Obama argued that that his approach to Iran is essentially the same as that which Ronald Reagan took toward the Soviet Union. Mr. Obama said that ” where I completely admire him was his recognition that [an agreement would be worth doing] if you were able to verify an agreement that you would negotiate with the evil empire that was hell-bent on our destruction and was a far greater existential threat to us than Iran will ever be.”

Illustration on Obama's undermining of the U.S. military by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Undermining the military

When President Obama announced that he was going to “fundamentally transform” America, not many Americans understood the full depth of that statement. Based on an assessment of his policies over the last six and half years, clearly one of Mr. Obama’s objectives has been to diminish America’s standing and leadership role throughout the world. One result has been that our allies now don’t trust us and our enemies don’t fear us — the worst possible combination.

President Johnson signs Medicare legislation July 30, 1965.                Associated Press photo

Medicare at age 50

Diehard defenders of President Obama’s continuing, wretched rollout of the Affordable Care Act may be quick to point out that other government programs, most notably Medicare, also had rocky starts. But the historical record doesn’t support such nonsense.

Illustration on courtesy, respect and rules in the U.S. Senate by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When tough talk roils the decorum of the Senate

The United States Senate has a long and justly celebrated tradition of comity and respect among members. Although there have been occasional exceptions throughout history, on the whole, senators have taken great care to treat each other with courtesy and respect, both in private discussions and in public deliberations.

Peace Through Strength Bunker Bomb Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Reviving ‘peace through strength’

Ever since the Ayatollah Khomeini and his Islamist storm troops took over Iran in 1979, the driving force of the country’s rulers has been (1) destroy Israel; (2) establish Iran as the hegemonist of the Middle East; and (3) drive out all Western influences from the region. Their efforts to create a nuclear arsenal has been part of their strategy to accomplish these goals.

Illustration on the controversy stirred during the creation of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Surviving ‘a perfect storm’ of opposition

Just two months ago, the nation marked the 40th anniversary of the fall of Saigon, and many of the stories in the media were illustrated with images of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial on the Mall, which over the past three decades has become an American cultural icon — symbolizing that difficult period in our history. Yet, that memorial, as we know it today, almost didn’t happen.

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Hillary Must Be Lying Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary lies again

In a column I wrote in early July, based on research by my colleagues and my own analysis of government documents and eyewitness statements, I argued that in 2011 and 2012 Secretary of State Hillary Clinton waged a secret war on the governments of Libya and Syria, with the approval of President Obama and the consent of congressional leadership from both parties and in both houses of Congress.

On the presidential campaign trail, Republicans are intensifying the pressure on Democratic front-runner Hillary Rodham Clinton, who has yet to comment on the videos despite being a pro-choice advocate who last year received Planned Parenthood's top honor, the PPFA Margaret Sanger Award. (Associated Press)

Hillary's past returns, with sharper teeth this time

"Those who cannot remember the past," the philosopher George Santayana reminded us, "are condemned to repeat it." The young, particularly the young voters of 2016, have no memory of Bill Clinton, and along with the rest of us they're about to get a reprise of the Hillary story.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Hokusai'

Between the 17th and 19th centuries, ukiyo-e was one of the most influential artistic styles in Japan. Composed of woodblock prints and traditional painting, typical scenes included historical events, folk stories, beautiful women and the rigors of daily life.

Meet Zhenyuanlong, a newly discovered species that even surprised the scientists who examined the 125 million-year-old, intact fossil (Image from Steve Brusatte)

Jurrasic squawk: Feathered dinosaur unearthed in China even surprised scientists who examined it

- The Washington Times

It was over five-feet long, was covered in long feathers, had short arms, talons to reckon with and resembled the Velociraptor - one of the starring monsters of the "Jurrasic Park" films. Meet Zhenyuanlong, a newly discovered species that even surprised the scientists who examined the 125 million-year-old, intact fossil - described as a winged dragon, and the largest on record.

Illustration Gun Free Zone by Greg Groesch for The Washington Times

Gun-free zones that never are

In the land of the blind, as the saying goes, the one-eyed man is king, and in the land of the disarmed the man with a gun is king. America is once more observing what passes for national mourning over the grim work of a nut acting out some sort of bizarre theory about the collapse of society by randomly shooting people.

A woman walks past an electronic board of a local bank showing the Hong Kong share index in Hong Kong Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2014. Global stocks sank under the weight of worries about the possible timing of a U.S. rate hike, economic weakness in China and an impending referendum on Scottish independence. Hong Kong's Hang Seng fell 1.9 percent to 24,705.36. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

China's shaky economy

Three weeks ago shares on the Shanghai stock market fell by nearly a third in value, wiping out $3 trillion in profits. When the cavalry arrived, the Communist Party leaders threw everything they had to stop the hemorrhaging. Capitalism is particularly precious to Communists.

Inspectors General and Hillary's Email Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama's great gambit

The plot thickens. As we all know, the inspector general of the intelligence community has discovered that a small number of emails on Hillary Rodham Clinton's personal, albeit mysterious, server were in fact classified e-mails. She as recently as this weekend denied that they were classified, but we shall see. There could be many more classified documents on that server. After all, she herself admits there were some 30,000 more e-mails.

Illustration on America's radical Islamist enemies by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Defeating the mortal enemies

"The enemy has to be defeated," U.S. Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter last week told American forces stationed in the Middle East. That is a simple truth, one that, regrettably, is not heard often from officials in the current administration. Mr. Carter then added: "It will be, because the barbarians are always defeated by civilization." That is a comforting sentiment -- one that, regrettably, is not supported by historical evidence.

Regulator should understand the industry

Credit unions hold six percent of the business lending market. Credit-union business loans are made in the local community and are typically focused on small businesses, churches and real-estate rentals. The average credit union business loan is less than $225,000. During the financial crisis the highest loss rate was less tha one percent. Do these loans sound like the "risky large loans," as your editorial suggests ("End run by the credit unions," Web, July 26)?

Deal great for U.S.-hating Iran

President Obama and Secretary of State Kerry have put the United States and other countries in jeopardy by entering into an agreement with Iran which temporarily curbs Tehran's nuclear-armaments program. Either our leaders have been duped or they are naive (or both). Mr. Obama and Mr. Kerry are more concerned about their respective legacies than the security of the world.