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Stanton Evans Portrait Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A tribute to Stan Evans

At last year’s CPAC Reagan banquet, Stan Evans regaled attendees with tales of the early days of the American Conservative Union. His remarks — oh so accurate, oh so funny, and preserved for posterity on YouTube — conveyed important history lessons.

Freedom yes, redefining marriage no

By an almost 2-1 margin, Americans in a recent poll declared they agree that “States and citizens should remain free to uphold marriage as the union of a man and a woman and the Supreme Court shouldn’t force all 50 states to redefine marriage.”

Muzzling the Government Watchdog Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Losing both bark and bite over Hillary’s emails

Outrage over the revelation of Hillary Clinton’s exclusive use of her personal email during her time at the State Department has brought broad-based criticism from the entire political spectrum. (In fact, it was the lefty New York Times that broke the story.)

President Barack Obama introduces first lady Michelle Obama in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, March 3, 2015, as they announce their ‘Let Girls Learn’ initiative. The Obama administration is expanding efforts and directing a variety of federal agencies to work with other countries to help young girls worldwide attend and stay in school. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

A crippled presidency

If someone were writing a book about America at this point in time, it should be titled “The Decline and Fall of Barack Obama’s Presidency.”

Soldiers listen to U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter at Kandahar Airfield in Afghanistan, Sunday, Feb. 22, 2015. Carter is making his first trip to visit troops and commanders in Afghanistan since his swearing-in this week. (AP Photo/Jonathan Ernst, Pool)

Vanquishing the enemy

As the Islamic State and other militant Islamist groups are attracting young men and women into its ranks, will we honor the primary duty of the federal government?

In this March 3, 2015, photo, President Barack Obama speaks about Iran and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's speech to Congress during a meeting with Defense Secretary Ashton Carter in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

The audacity of weakness

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu spoke to Congress on Tuesday to warn Americans of the anti-Western threats from theocratic — and likely to soon be nuclear — Iran.

The Court and the Burwell Obamacare Case Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A prescription for health care after Burwell

On Wednesday, the nine justices of the United States Supreme Court will consider the case of King v. Burwell, concerning the constitutionality of Obamacare, determining the limits of President Obama’s executive power and the ability of the president to rewrite laws on his own while ignoring the constitutional duties of the legislative branch of government.

A Nuclear-Armed Middle East Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The dubious deal of the century

Remember when President Obama said that to prevent the Islamic Republic of Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapons capability, he would keep all options “on the table”? How long has it been since anyone took that warning seriously?

The Tarheels Step on Themselves Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Cleaning up the campus boondoggles

Readers of this column are familiar with my argument that a conservative tide is sweeping the country, contrary to the mainstream media. In the off-year elections of 2010 and 2014, the gains made by conservatives have been substantial in governors’ mansions and in state legislatures. To be sure, they have been substantial in Washington, too, at the House and Senate level, but I would argue that they have been more consequential at the state level. There, old conventions that have been in place since the left-wing 1960s are being heaved out and a clamor of protest is being heard from the evicted. It can only get worse.

Related Articles

Petraeus got off easy

Gen. David Petraeus' plea deal for giving highly classified information to his mistress shows the shameful double standard that exists today in our legal system ("David Petraeus to plead guilty to removing classified information during affair," Web, March 3).

A rendition of a now-scrapped Arlington streetcar line.

No desire for a streetcar

Nearly everybody likes a streetcar, but most of them live only in the memories of old folks. Once upon a time streetcars ran nearly everywhere in nearly every big city in America, and in a lot of not-so-big cities. Two hundred miles of track, for example, tied Washington to its suburbs in Virginia and Maryland.

Nemtsov Memorial Poster Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Nemtsov's murder — the tip of Vladimir Putin's iceberg

The murder of my good friend Boris Nemtsov is a personal tragedy. When we met for lunch in Tel Aviv a few months ago, I warned him not to return to Moscow. Posters and ads denouncing him as a "national traitor" had been plastered all over the city's Novy Arbat Avenue and on the Internet.

Failing New York Schools Illustration by Nancy Ohanian

Taylor Swift's poor investment

Pop star Taylor Swift has donated $50,000 to the New York City public school system. Miss Swift, who was named the world's sixth most powerful celebrity by Forbes magazine, has commendably performed numerous acts of charity since moving into her $20 million Tribeca residence last year, including visits with sick children at Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

How bad housing policies led to the financial crisis

Peter Wallison's important, engaging and alarming "Hidden in Plain Sight" is the definitive work on the financial crisis and a must-read for policymakers, the commentariat and citizens wanting to pierce the populist anti-Wall-Street, anti-bank fog.

Netanyahu right on Iran

House Speaker John Boehner was wise to have Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speak to Congress in order to address the truth about Iran's evil designs to rule the Middle East ("Obama strikes back, scolds Netanyahu for offering 'nothing new,'" Web, March 3). Prime Minister Netanyahu displayed candid courage in the face of being snubbed by President Obama and Mr. Obama's Democratic minions, while Secretary of State John Kerry was busy capitulating to Iran's one-side negotiations.

Veteran NBC newsman Lester Holt is currently filling in for "Nightly News" anchorman Brian Williams, who has taken leave while questions about his credibility are sorted out by the network. (NBC News)

While Brian Williams waits out suspension, NBC News veteran Lester Holt ups the ratings

- The Washington Times

The substitute has bested the regular. NBC News veteran anchorman Lester Holt has upped the ratings at his network while substituting for Brian Williams, currently waiting out his six-month suspension from the job. Nielsen numbers reveal that Mr. Holt draws 10.1 million viewers each night — a rare milestone, and one that rival networks have not reached in eight seasons, according to AdAge. Mr. Holt has also increased the much coveted 25-54-year-old viewing audience by 6 percent, and NBC now leads CBS ad ABC.

Wake up, America

Islamism in America is advancing much more quickly than either our intelligence or national awareness. Elements of all transmutations of radical Islamic terrorism's tentacles are steadily rooting themselves into our nation's fabric, into our federal, state and local governments and industries. And they are infesting our nation in stealth ways, beyond our comprehensive detection. We know this from prior terrorist activities and events such as the World Trade Center attacks, including the first, by ground explosives.

Putin's Russia an ever-growing threat

Russian opposition leader Boris Nemtsov was gunned down near the Kremlin a day before his planned protest march against President Vladimir Putin's government ("Obama condemns 'brutal murder' of Putin critic Boris Nemtsov," Web, Feb. 27). This assassination is a continuation of the crimes that have been committed since President Boris Yeltsin appointed Mr. Putin to the position of prime minister on Aug. 9, 1999.

Addressing a joint meeting of Congress in Washington, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said an emerging U.S.-Iran deal would "all but guarantee" Tehran will get nuclear weapons. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

The Netanyahu speech

Benjamin Netanyahu knocked one out of the park Tuesday, and once it cleared the fence the ball beaned a man lurking in the shadows, and bounced into the tall grass. That man in the shadows looked a lot like President Obama.

Just-cut stacks of $100 bills make their way down the production line at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing's Western Currency Facility in Fort Worth, Texas, on Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2013. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

Got $1,000,000,000,000? The world's first trillionaire already in the making

- The Washington Times

Analysts predict that the world's first trillionaire will emerge on the planet — and it may be sooner than we think. This is someone who is worth at least this much: $1,000,000,000,000. The world may appear to be in chaos, but the wealthy charge on, "despite plunging oil prices and a weakened euro," reports Forbes magazine, which has identified a record 1,826 billionaires. Combined, they have a net worth of $7.05 trillion, which would pay less than half of the current federal debt. But no matter. The list includes 290 newcomers, 71 of whom hail from China.