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Illustration on Bill Cosby by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Cosby’s message survives personal disaster

What’s fascinating about the coverage of the persuasive accusations against Bill Cosby, now 18 and rising, is that race doesn’t dominate. There’s an outcry at the abuse of women, and he’s shredded the healthy black-father family man image he carefully cultivated on his sitcom, but you don’t read or hear notice taken of the fact that the women who say he drugged and raped them were usually white.

John Winthrop Portrait

The truly first Thanksgiving

What sustained both Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay was that, thankfully, America could be carved into a better community for all, providing that elusive but mysterious challenge that was missing from the lives of so many in England.

Death of the Sexual Revolution Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The joy of sex is over

So this is how the sexual revolution is ending. It is ending with gangs of angry women recalling alleged sexual assaults up to a half-century ago. Their alleged assailant in this case is the avuncular 77-year-old Bill Cosby.

illustration on the values of life and government by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Our gratitude belongs not to government, but to God

What if the government is designed to perpetuate itself? What if the real levers of governmental power are pulled by agents, diplomats and bureaucrats behind the scenes? What if they stay in power no matter who is elected president or which major political party controls Congress?

Illegal Aliens and Illegal Executive Orders Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama has forgotten his official duty is to Americans

Like millions of other Americans, I appreciate the plight of billions of people throughout the world who would like nothing more than to find themselves in the United States, where they could enjoy a much higher standard of living and wonderful opportunities for advancement. It should first be considered, however, that we have millions of people already mired in dire poverty.

Illustration on the negative impact of Obama's immigration action on black Americans by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Black voters for Obama get nothing but disrespect

- The Washington Times

President Obama discounted November’s election results because turnout is lower in midterm than in presidential elections, but there is reason to believe that his treatment of his base contributed to the decision of many Democrats to not bother going to the polls in what everyone recognized as a crucial election.

Ghost Town Soldier Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Europe’s sentinels have gone home

Josef Stalin, when asked in 1935 whether he could do anything with Russian Catholics to help win favor with the pope against the increasing Nazi threat, famously responded: “How many divisions has he got?”

Illustration on Middle East violence by Julius/Horsens Folkeblad, Horsens, Denmark

Slaughter in the synagogue

Executioners for the Islamic State use knives to cut the throats of Christians, Yazidis and “apostate” Muslims. Palestinian executioners last week used knives and a meat cleaver to slaughter Jewish worshippers at a synagogue in West Jerusalem.

FILE - In this Nov. 28, 2013, file photo, a giant Uncle Sam balloon is marched down Sixth Avenue during the 87th Annual Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York. Helium makes the huge balloons in the parade sail high above the crowd. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)

The covetousness crisis

The devastating effects of America’s covet-driven culture.

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A 40-pound tom turkey looks out at Raymond's Turkey Farm in Methuen, Mass., Friday, Nov. 21, 2014. The farm raises approximately 20,000 Broad Breasted White Holland turkeys per year. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

PETA to White House: You protect the rights of women - why not turkeys?

- The Washington Times

The People for Ethical Treatment of Animals tried their best, but the White House turkey pardoning will go on as scheduled in Wednesday in the Rose Garden before a bank of cameras, journalists, amused officials and cautious turkey handlers. The activist group previously reached out to First Daughters Malia and Sasha, pleading with them to become vegans and intercede on behalf of the pair of turkeys, who hail from Ohio. The group considers the ceremony offensive, and a promotion for poultry breeders.

Sen. Charles E. Schumer, New York Democrat. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Chuck Schumer's advice to Democrats: To win in 2016, embrace big government

- The Washington Times

As policy director for the Democratic Party, Sen. Charles Schumer promised to diagnose what went wrong for Democrats in the midterm elections. On Tuesday morning, he explained all at the National Press Club. The New York lawmaker said voters blamed the Democratic Party for a string of monumental government failures. But that's no excuse to give up on government, he cautioned - and an all-embracing government is the key to a 2016 White House win.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Executive order will make real reform harder

Crazy as it may seem, none of the debate about immigration reform focuses on the real issue ("Sen. Jeff Flake says executive action will make further immigration reform difficult," Web, Nov. 23). The primary division between Democrats and Republicans is not whether we treat illegal aliens humanely, but whether we should open our borders to anyone who wants access.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry addresses the media after the closed-door nuclear talks with Iran, in Vienna, Austria, Monday, Nov. 24, 2014. Facing still significant differences between the U.S. and Iran, negotiators gave up on last-minute efforts to get a nuclear deal by the Monday deadline and extended their talks for another seven months. The move gives both sides breathing space to work out an agreement but may be badly received by domestic sceptics, since it extends more than a decade of diplomatic efforts to curb Iran's nuclear prowess. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

EDITORIAL: Iran stalls again

The lot of a diplomat is not always a happy one. Life in striped pants can be challenging. So much Chablis and brie, so little time. It's not all polite chatter. In the matter of the crucial talks over the future of Iran's nuclear program, all the pushing and pulling of policy, all the huffing and puffing of inflamed egos, will probably be for naught. Sooner or later, unless the Israelis rescue the West from fear and indecision, Iran will have its Islamic bomb.

Congress Wields the Budget Ax Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Restoring regular order on Capitol Hill

So long as they do not overplay their hand, Republicans in the U.S. House and Senate have been given a wonderful opportunity to significantly pare the federal budget and shape U.S. policy in the last two years of the Obama administration.

Illustration on the effects of Obama's illegal alien order on the African American population by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How about putting Americans first?

The framers of the Constitution sought to limit the power of government and expand individual liberty. President Obama sees it the other way. Whether he violated the constitutional limits of his power will be debated and possibly decided in the courts and by the new Republican majority in Congress, but there is another issue surrounding the amnesty order that needs addressing.

Illustration on further Union intrusion on McDonald's and other franchises by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Going overboard at the labor board

Whom do you work for? Such a simple question should not require a government agency to give an answer. However, the Obama administration, in its never-ending quest for power over individuals and businesses, has decided that it — rather than you or your employer — should determine whom you work for.

EDITORIAL: The pigs find a loophole

"Earmarks," small, large and enormous pots of taxpayers' money that congressmen give themselves to fund pet projects in their districts, usually in return for votes, are a lot like Count Dracula. They won't stay dead. But last week the Republicans in the House put down an attempt by one of their own to resurrect them.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Drug-free or land of free?

Thank you for making the case for civil forfeiture reform in your recent editorial ("Time for civil-forfeiture reform," Web, Nov. 17). Right now, police can confiscate cars, cash and homes without charging owners with a crime. Vague allegations of drug trafficking don't justify turning protectors of the peace into financial predators. The drug war threatens the integrity of a country founded on the concept of limited government.