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Sebastian Kurz     Associated Press photo

An Austrian thumb in the eye of the elites

- The Washington Times

The elites everywhere are having a hard time. When the peasants no longer salute, tug a forelock and obey with a whimper, even if with a snarl and a whine, you know you’ve lost your mojo.

Chart to accompany Rahn article of Oct. 17, 2017.

Schooling the U.S. on economic freedom

Once again, there is more evidence that economic freedom leads to success. Many of the former communist countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union have made enormous economic progress from the time they became free almost three decades ago.

Illustration on Richard Nixon's role in the Vietnam War by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A faulty retelling of ‘The Vietnam War’

When Richard Nixon was in the White House, I was in Vietnam and he was my commander in chief. When I was on Ronald Reagan’s National Security Council staff, I had the opportunity to brief former President Nixon on numerous occasions and came to admire his analysis of current events, insights on world affairs and compassion for our troops. His preparation for any meeting or discussion was exhaustive. His thirst for information was unquenchable and his tolerance for fools was nonexistent.

Illustration on China's designs on the electric car market by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The race for electric vehicle dominance

General Motors and Ford are scurrying to realign for what many believe are the next big things — driverless and electric vehicles (EVs) — but don’t look to Detroit, Japan or Germany for the mighty impulse that transforms personal transportation. With the world’s largest car market and savvy government policies, the advantage goes to China.

Illustration on NATO' difficult situation with member nation Turkey by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Saving NATO from Turkey

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization, known as NATO, faces an existential problem.

A Game of Political Football Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A Republican team with no offense

Is the Republican Party in trouble? The primary fight defeat in Alabama and the quick retirement signal by Sen. Bob Corker are not the only straws in the wind. Current polling shows Republicans trail Democrats by 8 percentage points in a generic 2018 House race.

President Donald Trump boards Air Force One, Monday, Oct. 16, 2017, in Andrews Air Force Base, Md., en route Greenville, S.C., for a fundraiser for South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Toward a better nuclear deal with Iran

To hear President Trump’s political opponents describe it, the decision to decertify the Iran Deal is a major miscalculation — a needlessly provocative action that could even bring all-out war.

While early voting may seem more convenient, it actually decreases turnout. (Associated Press/File)

Early voting disadvantages seem to outweigh benefits

Early voting — opening a limited number of locations where people can cast their ballots prior to Election Day — is a “reform” that states should reconsider. Its disadvantages seem to outweigh its benefits.

Illustration on pro-active measures for protecting American cybersecurity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Russia’s aggressive cyberwar

Russian President Vladimir Putin’s regime has been highly aggressive in pursuing cyberwar and cyberespionage at least since its 2007 attacks on the Estonian government. The fact that it is routinely attacking U.S. defense and intelligence cyber-networks can be no surprise.

Illustration on the history leading up the North Korean nuclear crisis by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How we got to a nuclear North Korea

President Trump and his Cabinet have said repeatedly that the present state of affairs with North Korea represents 25 years of American foreign policy failure going back over at least three presidents — Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Barack Obama. Reviewing this disaster, there are at least three major mileposts.

American Intellectual Property Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A better deal with NAFTA 2.0

America’s trade negotiators are now in the process of crafting a 2.0 update of the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Fortunately, it now appears that Donald Trump’s intention on NAFTA is to mend it, not end it. The trade deal has been a stunning economic success for all three nations: Canada, Mexico and the United States. Freer trade has meant steady increases in the volume of trade, greater competitiveness and lower prices.

Pope Francis, left, asperges incense in front of an icon of Mary and baby Jesus as he celebrates a canonization mass for 35 new saints in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Sunday, Oct.15, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

A step toward ending injustice in abortion

Human liberty and dignity notched a big win earlier this month. The Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act is a landmark step adding further protections for the unborn by criminalizing abortions performed after 20 weeks into a pregnancy.

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Washington Redskins quarterback Kirk Cousins (8) carries the ball toward the end zone a touchdown as San Francisco 49ers defensive end Solomon Thomas (94) looks on during the second half of an NFL football game in Landover, Md., Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

LOVERRO: Sunday's game adds to Shanahan's case for Cousins

Here's Kyle Shanahan's case for Kirk Cousins to come play for him next season: "Kirk, I nearly just beat your heavily favored team on the road with a kid fresh out of college who had barely stepped on an NFL football field. Imagine what the two of us can do together."

FILE - In this Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017, file photo, former President Barack Obama speaks during the Goalkeepers Conference in New York. Obama is set to return to the campaign trail for the first time since he left office with a rally to help Democrat Ralph Northam in Virginia's closely watched race for governor. The Northam campaign announced Wednesday, Oct. 11, that the lieutenant governor and Obama will appear together at an event in Richmond on Oct. 19. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)

The Iran nuclear agreement finally gets a skeptical eye

Maximum hot air, minimum bottom line. That's the prospect for the world over the next few weeks in the wake of President Trump's Friday declaration that he won't certify that the Islamic mullahs in Iran are living up to their end of the deal they made with Barack Obama. This was the one-sided agreement by which the mullahs would give up their quest for nuclear weapons.

In this Nov. 14, 2013, file photo, producer Harvey Weinstein attends the New York premiere of "Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom" in New York. Weinstein faces multiple allegations of sexual abuse and harassment from some of the biggest names in Hollywood. (Photo by Andy Kropa/Invision/AP, File)

Democratic politicians look for ways to express high dudgeon on the cheap

Nearly a week went by before Hillary Clinton pulled together a statement about Harvey Weinstein's abuse of women. Hillary's against abusing women and it turns out that she took so long to say so because she was trying to find the words to describe how deep her outrage runs. Abuse of women, and even credible accusations of forcible rape, are not unknown in Hillaryworld. Perhaps she hoped to draft Bubba's help to describe her outrage. Bubba's good with words. Or perhaps she was so busy tabulating good ol' Harvey's contributions to various Clinton "charities" that she just didn't get around to it sooner.

Stop ignoring founding principles

Fred Eckert's review of Charles J. Sykes' book, "How The Right Lost Its Mind" ("Conservatism betrayed," web, Oct. 9), stresses that Republicans abandoned their conservative "principles" and "truth" for "a new tribalism that valued neither." I'd say the Democrats did the same. And both parties have ignored the fundamental principles that our Declaration of Independence highlighted as "self-evident" truths 240 years ago.

Buy your own contraception

As it rejiggers Obamacare, the Trump administration has visited anew the idea that employers opposed to contraception for recreational sex as a matter of religious belief should not be forced to pay for it. Until Obamacare was forced upon an unwelcoming public by a strict party-line vote, men and the women we dated took it upon ourselves to provide the prerequisites for such recreation, including contraception.

Taking a knee no hero's move

I enjoyed reading Judge Andrew P. Napolitano's recent op-ed on the NFL and protected speech ("Taking a knee and protected speech," Web, Oct. 11). I agree with the old Beatrice Evelyn Hall quote, "I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it." However, I feel that the taking of a knee is really just egotistical grandstanding by players who make far more money than the average citizen of any skin color.

Political murders and a persistent accusation

The allegation is contained "Orders to Kill," Amy Knight's book, which is a richly detailed account of the murders of multiple Putin foes over the years, including one brazen assassination of a would-be "reformer" literally in the shadow of the Kremlin. Although evidence strongly points to President Putin as responsible for many of the killings, "Putin is never seen holding a smoking gun," as Ms. Knight writes.

This March 22, 2016, file photo shows U.S. President Barack Obama, right, and his Cuban counterpart Raul Castro wave to cheering fans as they arrive for a baseball game between the Tampa Bay Rays and the Cuban national baseball team, in Havana, Cuba. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell, File)

Barack Obama should apologize for Cuba

- The Washington Times

So far, 22 American diplomats and their family members have been harmed in unexplained attacks in Cuba -- the country Barack Obama assured was our new bestie, maybe even more so than Iran. Obama needs to apologize.

Twitter, red-faced, unlocks Rose McGowan

- The Washington Times

Anybody who's ever been blocked or locked or limited by Twitter knows -- the company never explains why. It only sends a standard form memo that speaks of "violating terms of service," or some other such bland and nondescript reason. The Rose McGowan-Twitter saga has ended somewhat differently.

Illustration on the necessary nationalism of America and India by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why global leaders are putting their countries first

To anyone who listened to President Trump's speech before the U.N. General Assembly in September one thing should have been abundantly clear: The president wasn't there for anyone else's interests but America's.