Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

A poor way to fight poverty

It’s been 50 years now since the federal government launched its “War on Poverty.” But the numbers just released by the Census Bureau suggest we’re in a losing battle.

A woman walks past an electronic board of a local bank showing the Hong Kong share index in Hong Kong Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2014. Global stocks sank under the weight of worries about the possible timing of a U.S. rate hike, economic weakness in China and an impending referendum on Scottish independence. Hong Kong's Hang Seng fell 1.9 percent to 24,705.36. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

The long-run solution to an economic mess

Yes, the world is a mess — but there is a long-run solution. The solution is a world of modest-size governmental units — like Virginia and Switzerland, with no larger entity to bail them out if they make bad decisions.

Gen. James Conway            Associated Press photo

Obama’s all-American show in Iraq

- The Washington Times

Several American presidents have had quarrels with their generals, sometimes for reluctance to take the fight to the enemy, occasionally for wanting to take too much fight to the foe.

Illustration on the consequences of political donor information disclosure laws by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The right to speak and be left alone

The best time to speak out about the policy issues you believe in is during the time of year when the most people are paying attention — the election season.

Illustration at the political hyping of AmeriCorps by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

AmeriCorps birthday bash baloney

President Obama and former President Bill Clinton were surrounded by a swarm of gray-shirted devotees Sept. 12 as they celebrated the 20th birthday of AmeriCorps on the South Lawn of the White House.

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Clapper’s off-target intelligence strategy

Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper has just released a new National Intelligence Strategy, the first in five years. It’s a highly unsatisfying read for two reasons.

Illustration on the failures of tne war on poverty by Alexander hunter/The Washington Times

The War on Poverty: 50 years of failure

In January 1964, President Johnson declared “unconditional war on poverty in America.” Since then, the taxpayers have spent $22 trillion on Johnson’s war.

Illustration on the need for ground troops by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The error of relying on air power

It is the 21st-century version of the classic question once posed by The Eagles. So who you gonna’ believe: President Obama or your lyin’ eyes?

Related Articles

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Liar's Wife'

The artful relationships among the four novellas collected in Mary Gordon's "The Liar's Wife" make this volume way more than the sum of its parts.

Supporters of the No vote in the Scottish independence referendum circle round a flare as they gather to celebrate the referendum result in George Square, Glasgow, Scotland, Friday, Sept. 19, 2014.  Following a long night that brought floods of relief for some and bitter disappointment for others, Scotland awoke with a hangover Friday after voting to reject independence.  Now, the task was to heal the divide — and use the energy the referendum unleashed to hold London politicians to promises of more powers for Scotland.  (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

EDITORIAL: Scotland, saved from secession

The Scots thought twice about independence, and did the right thing. They preserved the United Kingdom as we know it and saved themselves and the world from a lot of grief that would have inevitably spilled into unexpected places.

A large American Flag is unfurled on the Pentagon a day before the anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, Arlington, Va., Wednesday, September 10, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

CROCKER: What Patton would think of America 2014

If you took a doughboy of the Great War – say, Gen. George S. Patton – and dropped him in America today, what would he think of the country he fought to defend?

Illustration on the enduring myth of FDR by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The enduring myth of FDR and the New Deal

My seventh-grade son recently wrote a U.S. History paper extolling the virtues of President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal. "It ended the Great Depression," he wrote with great certainty. He's only 12 and parroting what the history texts and his teachers told him.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Defeat of ISIS requires working with Syria

America suffers a profound lack of intellectual clarity in its policy regarding Syria. We are torn between the urgent need to halt the explosive growth of the Islamic State, also known as ISIS, and the desire of policymakers such as Hillary Clinton, John F. Kerry and John McCain, to vindicate their flawed Mideast strategy.

FILE - In this Nov. 23, 2011 file photo, an American flag flies from the U.S. Capitol in Washington. The federal government ran a lower budget deficit in August 2014 than a year ago, remaining on track to record the lowest deficit for the entire year since 2008. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

It's not for frugal: Half of the U.S. Senate gets an F in 'fiscal performance'

- The Washington Times

Alas, almost half of the U.S. Senate has earned an F grade in "fiscal performance" according to the National Taxpayers Union's 35th annual rating of Congress. Indeed, 45 senators received the rock bottom grade on the scorecard, which analyzes their responses to every single roll call vote affecting federal taxes, spending, debt and significant regulations.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Virgin Way'

How do you institutionalize genius? Although this question is familiar to students of American government and military science, it is particularly elusive in business, where corporate leadership is often a contradiction in terms

Adrian Peterson     Associated Press photo

Lessons from the Adrian Peterson case

I'm not a football fan, but everybody is having to watch a brilliant star being taken down and buried in a pile-up — his career jeopardized, his reputation in ruins.

Illustration on Americans' irritation with Obama by Kevin Kreneck/Tribune Content Agency

Adding up the damage to America

Here are the dreary details on what's been happening in our nation's capital this week, but be forewarned: It isn't a pretty picture.