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Tax Reform for Economic Growth Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Thinking clearly about tax reform

President Trump has said he is going to move on to tax reform after the debacle with Obamacare repeal. Is there any reason that we can expect greater success with the tax reform effort? I argue no, unless the rules in the House and Senate are modified, and those in Congress, whose brains are connected enough to distinguish between tax rates and tax revenues, take control.

President Donald Trump arrives to sign various bills in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, Monday, March 27, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Less personality, more policy

In the aftermath of the debacle over the Republican effort to repeal and replace Obamacare, President Trump can learn a valuable lesson that will serve him well in the next battle over tax reform and other issues.

This Thursday, May 12, 2016, file photo, shows a sign outside a restroom at 21c Museum Hotel in Durham, N.C. The Associated Press has determined that North Carolina's law limiting LGBT protections will cost the state more than $3 billion in lost business over a dozen years. That's despite Republican assurances that the "bathroom bill" isn't hurting the economy. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)

Transgenderism’s friendly neighborhood media

- The Washington Times

The Associated Press came out with a cost estimate of how North Carolina’s so-dubbed “bathroom bill” — you know, the one that makes clear that boys must stay in their own restrooms, and girls, likewise — is going to cost the state $3.76 billion over the next dozen or years. What the estimate is based on is the hope and prayer that nobody asks questions. Because under scrutiny, the numbers pretty much crumble.

Illustration on the situation of the Korean peninsula by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Possibilities for reunifying the Korean Peninsula

With North Korea threatening its sixth nuclear test, and the pace of its ballistic-missile tests quickening, Pyongyang’s global threat is ever more imminent. Twenty-five years of self-defeating American efforts to negotiate with the world’s only hereditary Communist dictatorship have, not surprisingly, proven fruitless.

Illustration on Ross Perot's fiscal warnings    The Washington Times

The sagacity of Ross Perot

Exhibit A is the national debt, which reached $20 trillion this year — or $164,000 for every income taxpayer in the country. Because politicians don’t have a plan to address this issue that satisfies most of their constituency, they operate as if it doesn’t exist.

Obamacare Repeal Failure Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Botching the Obamacare repeal

As of last week, House Speaker Paul Ryan’s crumbling halfway house — known officially as the American Health Care Act — definitively collapsed.

North Korean Nuclear War Threat Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The North Korean war scare

In 2015 the Intelligence Community declassified The 1983 Soviet “War Scare” — the definitive report by the president’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board on how and why the USSR nearly launched a preemptive nuclear strike during the NATO theater nuclear exercise ABLE ARCHER-83, held in November 1983.

Illustration on U.S./Saudi cooperation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Resetting U.S.-Saudi relations

Saudi Arabia is looking forward to a resumption of strong and friendly relations with the U.S. following the recent visit of Saudi Deputy Crown Prince bin Salman with President Trump at the White House.

Illustration on the GOP and the Federal budget by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Republican budget woes

President Trump and Republicans in Congress have a once in a generation opportunity to dramatically roll back the frontiers of government but will likely fall short because of their lack of candor and finesse.

FILE - In this Dec. 1, 2016, file photo, President-elect Donald Trump speaks at the Carrier Corp. factory in Indianapolis. The $7 million deal to save jobs at the Carrier factory in Indianapolis is poised for approval by state officials nearly four months after President Donald Trump celebrated his role in the negotiations with a post-election visit to the plant. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings, File)

Steering attention left

Meanwhile, here on Earth, mainstream websites, newspapers, TV and radio trash President Trump incessantly. Consumer confidence gallops? New jobs bulge? The stock market soars? Immaterial. The president is teetering, according to reports that so many Americans follow. Just stroll through a recent day’s snippet at Yahoo and you see not one positive angle. Only these:

Huey P. Long (Associated press)

Here comes the judge

- The Washington Times

Neil Gorsuch took the best shots, such as they were, of disheartened, dismayed and despondent Democrats this week, and nobody laid a glove on him. He was as fresh when it was over as when the slugging, such as it was, began.

Related Articles

GOP's Russian problem

I read with great interest Andrew Blake's article, "Trump adviser Flynn discussed sending Erdogan foe to Turkey: Reports" (Web, March 25), which details how President Trump's former national security adviser, Michael Flynn, discussed with Turkish-government officials the possibility of sending Turkish dissident Fethullah Gulen back to Turkey. This is not the first time the retired general has enjoyed the spotlight. There was no investigation by Congress into Mr. Flynn's ties to the Russian government, and now we're learning about another 'oops' on Congress' part.

Boycott "sanctuary cities"

California lawmakers are following the lead of a proposal from a New York City councilwoman and seeking to ban private construction companies that bid on building President Trump's wall from doing further business with their state or city. San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee called the wall "a strong symbolism of division in our country." Forget symbolism; what about reality? On Long Island an MS-13 gang member who was deported four times was charged with the sexual assault of a two-year-old. After hearing this sick and sadistic crime against humanity, how can anyone with a conscience not be in favor of the wall to protect law-abiding American citizens?

This Nov. 11, 2012, photo shows surfers on a broad, sandy beach near the NRG El Segundo power plant in El Segundo, Calif. A new study predicts that with limited human intervention, 31 percent to 67 percent of Southern California beaches could completely erode back to coastal infrastructure or sea cliffs by the year 2100, with sea-level rises of 3.3 feet (1 meter) to 6.5 feet (2 meters). The study released Monday, March 27, 2017, used a new computer model to predict shoreline effects caused by sea level rise and changes in storm patterns due to climate change. (AP Photo/John Antczak)

Bad news for climate change boondogglers

Predicting tomorrow's weather is often a crapshoot. Predicting the weather on a day a century from now is obviously throwing money away. Shoveling cash into schemes for regulating climate patterns generations far in the future is an investment in a fool's gold mine. President Trump vows that Americans won't be fooled again.

Pro-life activists converge in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday, Jan. 27, 2017, during the annual March for Life. Thousands of anti-abortion demonstrators gathered in Washington for an annual march to protest the Supreme Court's landmark 1973 decision that declared a constitutional right to abortion. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Safe, legal and not so rare

Bill Clinton famously said he didn't like abortion, and only wanted to make it "safe, legal and rare." The abortion lobby picked it up as a nice slogan, and used it often. But that was then and this is now. The abortion lobby is proposing now in Hawaii that "pro-life counselors" be required to recruit young women for abortions.

Looking down from the top of a crime family

Ralph Natale, the boss of the Philadelphia-South Jersey Cosa Nostra organized crime family in the 1990s, was the first mob boss to become a government witness.

In this Sept. 8, 2015, file photo, a United Airlines passenger plane lands at Newark Liberty International Airport in Newark, N.J. United said on Monday, March 27, 2017, that regular-paying fliers are welcome to wear leggings aboard its flights, even though two teenage girls were barred by a gate agent from boarding a flight from Denver to Minneapolis Sunday because of their attire. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)

Let the leggings be banned! (Burqas, too)

- The Washington Times

United Airlines, in case you missed the news cycle the last 24 hours, has stirred a major social media controversy with its demand that two little girls cover up their leggings or fly some other plane.

In this Monday, Jan. 23, 2017, file photo, White House Senior Adviser Jared Kushner, right, listens to President Donald Trump speak during a breakfast with business leaders in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. Trump is set to announce a new White House office run by his son-in-law, Kushner, that will seek to overhaul government functions using ideas from the business sector. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

Trump: Beating back bureaucracy with business

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump will announce Monday the formation of a new Office of American Innovation, to be headed by his son-in-law and senior adviser, Jared Kushner. And aside from the George Orwellian-sounding bent -- the ministries of Love, Peace, Truth and Plenty in "1984" that weren't -- it's a fine idea.

True believers never satisfied

The ongoing brouhaha about whether President Trump or his associates have been in cahoots with Vladimir Putin or Mr. Putin's thugs will never be settled to the satisfaction of some Democrats.

The first Brexit

For more than 50 years British historian John Julius Norwich has been generating scores of thoroughly researched, engagingly written books that are damned with the faint praise of being "popular" histories. This is unjust as it is wrong.

In this Feb. 1, 2012, file photo, miles of pipe ready to become part of the Keystone Pipeline are stacked in a field near Ripley, Okla. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)

Keystone moves on, slowly

The Keystone pipeline is inching slowly forward. After more than a decade of back-and-forth bickering between Republicans and Democrats, between business interests and radical environmentalists, the State Department of the Trump administration has finally given its permission, as required by law, to let the oil flow. TransCanada, the company that is building Keystone, praises the new president for clearing the stones, stumps and twigs remaining in the way.

The Republicans couldn't even fire a blank

Marching the regiment up the hill, with every musket fully loaded, and then down again without firing a shot is no way to inspire an army. Paul Ryan's Republicans, who boasted for seven years that they couldn't wait to get their hands on the Democrats and Obamacare, promising to make quick work of repeal and replace, couldn't even get close enough to fire blanks.