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The land of the cheerful giver

The Lord loveth a cheerful giver, as the Apostle Paul tells us, and some of the most generous givers are the most cheerful among the faithful, and they live among us in America.

Scimitar canary illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Islamic jihad comes to campus

The world is witnessing a resurgence of global anti-Semitism not seen since the 1930s and the “Final Solution.” In the Middle East, Hitler-admiring regimes like Iran, and Hitler-admiring parties like Hezbollah, Hamas and the Muslim Brotherhood, are openly planning to finish the job the Nazis started. Even in America, until now the most hospitable place outside of Israel for Jews, the atmosphere is more hostile than at any time in the last 70 years.

Illustration on the history of successful presidents passing a "third term" to their political successors by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The odds against a presidential three-peat

Republicans looking ahead to 2016 take heart: History is on your side. For more than a century, only twice has a party held the White House for at least three consecutive presidential elections. Both times, it took each party’s greatest president of this period — Franklin Roosevelt and Ronald Reagan — to accomplished the feat. That fact should be a major concern to Democrats, who will be seeking their party’s third consecutive term on President Obama’s record.

Union attempts to organize fast food illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The $50 million question

Facing what appears to be terminal decline, the Service Employees International Union has taken to a desperate Hail Mary play to keep their bank accounts well-funded. This week SEIU and its “worker center” front groups, led by Berlin Rosen — a political consultancy with ties to New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and other left-wing groups — staged various media stunts claiming to be “strikes” against fast food restaurants for higher wages.

Protecting the U.S. electrical grid illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Putting America in the dark

The recent temporary blackout in Washington that afflicted the White House, the Congress and interrupted a State Department press conference rightly provoked a spate of media commentary about the vulnerability of the electric grid to terrorist attack. The blackout reportedly was caused by a small explosion resulting from a malfunction in a transformer substation.

Illustration on the packaging of Hillary Clinton's candidacy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The selling of the new Hillary

Joe McGinnis, a young writer who got access to the advertising agency with the Nixon account in 1968, changed the way we thought about electing presidents with his best-seller, “The Selling of the President.”

Illustration on restoring the American dream by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The exceptional thing the successful GOP candidate must say

The successful Republican candidate for president will have to be many things: fearless fighter, relentless advocate for conservative principles, articulate spokesperson for the forgotten middle class, a likable charismatic personality, expert on the complicated dynamics of foreign policy and national security strategy.

Ethnicity mask illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The transracial nation

Not long ago, The New York Times uncovered the artifact that Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush had once listed himself as “Hispanic” on a Florida voter registration form.

Illustration on Obama's killing of Americans without due process by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Can the president kill Americans?

Can the president kill you? The short answer is: yes, but not legally. Yet, President Obama has established a secret process that involves officials from the departments of Justice and Defense, the CIA, and the White House senior staff whereby candidates are proposed for execution, and the collective wisdom of the officials then recommends execution to the president, who then accepts or rejects the recommendation.

Republicans breaking campaign promises illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The wimpy GOP Congress

Last November, Americans sent a stern message to President Obama and the Democrats when they delivered Congress to the Republicans. That’s because Republicans made a lot of promises to them in the last election. Those commitments were instrumental to their victory; they were actions Americans were demanding and Republicans were vowing to deliver.

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Scene from the movie "Little Boy"

'Little Boy': A classic modern film

There are classic films, like the ones on TCM and AMC, and there are modern films. There are few modern classics. "Little Boy," in theaters April 24, could be a modern classic.

Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada pauses during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 14, 2015, following a Senate policy luncheon. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Choking on gall and wormwood

Harry Reid is having shrinking pains, choking on a diet of gall and wormwood. He is not dealing well with the events of last November, when he lost the comfort and prominence of the Senate. The Senate's longtime Democratic leader revealed to an interviewer this week how the not-so-sweet mystery of life continues to elude him. He cannot understand why people don't like him. He thinks it's "unfortunate."

Contained fighting could up U.S. security

Due to indecision by the Obama White House to support moderate Sunni rebels in Syria, Islamic terrorists in Syria (the so-called Islamic State) were able to reposition forces and attack the Iraqi army, which folded and abandoned its U.S. equipment, including many Humvees and 155-millimeter guns.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton takes notes during a roundtable with educators and students at the Kirkwood Community College's Jones County Regional Center, Tuesday, April 14, 2015, in Monticello, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Adventures in the Scooby van

The silly season begins, when nobody follows presidential politics but the men and women of press and tube who are paid to do it. Still, on her first venture out of the shadows we learned several substantial things about "the new Hillary." She stopped at a Chipotle on the highway south of Toledo, en route to Iowa, and nobody recognized her behind a pair of dark sunglasses. She lunched on a chicken burrito bowl (with guacamole) and when she pulled into her hotel in Pittsburgh she was not hungry for further fine dining, and ordered "Scooby snacks" from the room-service menu. She's traveling in an "upgraded" Chevrolet van, "approved" by the Secret Service, christened "the Scooby van."

Illustration on reformation for Islam by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The case for Islamic heresy

By now, you should be familiar with the name Ayaan Hirsi Ali. You should know at least this much about her: She is brilliant, beautiful, black and she has been banned near Boston.

End of the IRS tax code illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The tax code at sunset

We are officially off to the 2016 races. Texas Sen. Ted Cruz was the first official candidate to enter the GOP primary contest, followed by Sens. Rand Paul and Marco Rubio. Many more will undoubtedly follow.

Hold Clinton accountable

As an independent voter, I voted for Bill Clinton the second time around. Back then I spoke out against the Republicans for unmercifully going after him for his sexual involvement with a White House intern. From my perspective the attacks were a detriment to the seat of the presidency and made the entire country look like a soap opera in the eyes of the world. That brings me to former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton.

Austin Bryant celebrates his victory at tether ball with Hogan Conder during recess at Marlin Elementary School in Bloomington, Ind.

When nanny runs amok

In the beginning there were good parents and bad parents. Then came "deadbeat dads," who didn't support their children. "Soccer moms" were (mostly suburban) mothers who spent a good part of their day getting their children to the playing fields on time. Then "helicopter parents" arrived, hovering over everything their kids did.

When sanctions work and when they don’t

At a time when once again, for the umpteenth time in postwar America, the imposition of economic sanctions and just how they should be applied is a hot-button topic in Washington's corridors of power, here comes this provocative book which seems to be telling us that using them is at best almost useless and at worst actually counterproductive.

Fidel Castro, 1962. Associated Press photograph

Reminding Obama about Cuba's history

Does anyone remember what it was that turned America hostile toward the tropical paradise of Cuba? Our president tells us that "we're caught in a time warp, going back to the 1950s and gunboat diplomacy, and 'Yanquis' and the Cold War." Yes, really, "gunboat diplomacy." That is how University of Chicago adjunct law professors talk about American foreign policy. And he adds, "Sometimes those controversies date back to before I was born." So, what got America so riled up over the Castro brothers and Cuban communists even before Barack Obama was born?

Illustration: Death tax by Alexander Hunter for The Washington Times

Kill the death tax

People shouldn't be taxed after they die and small family businesses shouldn't be taxed as they are passed down to the next generation.