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Rogue Banks Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Institutions gone rogue

Are government-created institutions out of control? Domestic and international government institutions and agencies are created on the premise that they will make things better for the people. But all too often, those who lead these institutions and agencies drift away from the core mission or become corrupted. When they do so, they undermine faith in civil society.

Rep. Maxine Waters attends the Black Girls Rock! Awards at the New Jersey Performing Arts Center on Saturday, Aug. 5, 2017, in Newark, N.J. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP) ** FILE **

Maxine Waters’ remark is Secret Service worthy

- The Washington Times

If Maxine Waters wore a Republican hat — if Donald Trump wore a Democratic one — the Secret Service would already be in overdrive right now, busily getting to the root of remarks she made publicly that could be taken as calls for violence against the president.

FILE - In this Jan. 8, 2017 file photo, Harvey Weinstein arrives at The Weinstein Company and Netflix Golden Globes afterparty in Beverly Hills, Calif. New York state's top prosecutor has launched a civil rights investigation into The Weinstein Co. following sexual assault allegations against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein. Attorney General Eric Schneiderman announced the probe Monday. His office says it issued a subpoena seeking all company records (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File)

Sexual harassment up close and personal

While trying not to indulge in schadenfreude over those hypocritical Hollywood elites who’ve claimed to stand for “women’s rights,” only to be accused of sexually harassing them, I noticed “#MeToo” trending on Twitter. At #MeToo, women who have been sexually harassed are invited to post their experiences and many have done so, including four female U.S. senators.

Illustration on unseen Russian influence in Egypt by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Russia’s ominous return to the Middle East

One of the most significant foreign policy events of the last 50 years is the introduction of Russian forces in the heartland of the Middle East and through this development, a restored cooperation with Egypt. Henry Kissinger noted that the Russian deployment of military forces in Syria is “unprecedented in Russian history presenting a challenge that American Middle East policy has not encountered in at least four decades.”

Saving Money with SNAP Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A smart upgrade for SNAP

Imagine Grandma toiling her days away in a factory. That’s the image that came to mind as Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue called for stiffer work requirements for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients. With a $70 billion annual price tag, SNAP is the costliest item in the Farm Bill. Mr. Perdue’s proposal aims to edge out some participants and cut costs. With most beneficiaries being children, elderly or the already working, that’s not an effective solution or one that most people will warm to.

Illustration on the moral and strategic importance of an independent Kurdistan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The triumph of evil in Kurdistan

As Edmund Burke once stated, “The one thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good people to do nothing.”

U.N. Immigration Policy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Undermining U.S. sovereignty over immigration

In his Sept. 19 speech before the United Nations General Assembly, President Trump highlighted the importance of national sovereignty, declaring: “Strong sovereign nations let their people take ownership of the future and control their destiny.”

Illustration on the risk of EMP attacks on the nation's power grid by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How the electric grid has been compromised

Bureaucracies know how to deal with really challenging problems that affect the survival of our country: Kill the messenger.

Illustration on the success of Trumponomics in red states by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Where Trumponomics is working

One reason the two of us were so confident that President Trump’s economic policies would be positive for workers, the economy and the stock market, is that we’ve seen first-hand these policies work in the states. Many liberal economists have been insisting that Mr. Trump’s promise of a 3 or 4 percent growth is a fantasy and that 2 percent growth is the best we can do.

Modest Growth Rate Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The tax cut reality

As Republicans balance competing interests to craft a tax cut, both Democrats and the Trump administration are making outrageous claims.

Making Pyramid Schemes Illegal Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Keeping shady business practices at bay

Scams affect us all. As Nebraska’s attorney general from 2003-2015, one of my key priorities was safeguarding against scams. In 2010, I helped Nebraska’s Legislature pass a model law to protect consumers from pyramid schemes. Similar laws have now been adopted in 21 states.

Roger Goodell. (Associated Press)

The NFL owners with a playbook of their own

- The Washington Times

The owners of the National Football League finally came up with a playbook of their own. Beset by players who want to be political commentators who work from their knees, and by angry fans who only want to watch a football game without insult to the country they love, the owners consulted their playbook and think they can run out the clock.

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In this Dec. 7, 2016, file photo, AXS TV Chairman and Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban listens on Capitol Hill in Washington. Just seven months into the Trump presidency, Republicans and right-leaning independents have begun to contemplate the possibility of an organized bid to take down a sitting president from within.  (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Mark Cuban: Make up your mind -- or shhh

- The Washington Times

Celebrity "Shark Tank" show's Mark Cuban said he is "seriously considering" running for the White House in 2020, Donald Trump be danged. Now there's a race that should be interesting to watch. If it ever happens, of course. Which is may, or may not, or could, or very well won't, apparently depending on the time of day, record of interview, and heat of the moment. In other words: Make up your mind already. Or shhhh.

Handcuffs used on men arrested for prostitution solicitation sit on a table at a hotel in Minot, N.D., on Saturday, Jan. 31, 2015 in this file photo. (AP Photo/Martha Irvine) **FILE**

The myth of the happy hooker

The state has tried to eliminate, regulate and exploit the oldest profession for centuries, and no one has come up with a lasting formula. But now the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco has cleared the way for "prostitution activists" to proceed with a lawsuit in a lower court to overturn the California law banning the trade, and the suit may have constitutional consequences.

Participants in the annual Trick or Treat Main Street go from business to business for candy and other items during the evening Halloween celebration, Friday, Oct. 20, 2017, in Pittston, Pa. (Dave Scherbenco/The Citizens' Voice via AP)

Ghosts on the run

Having given the back of the hand to Christopher Columbus, the snowflakes have gone to work on another suspect holiday, this one the preserve of ghosts and goblins. Just when everyone thought it was safe to be dead, pious ire of the politically correct is turned toward the Eve of All Hallows.

Tracing Ukraine's travails

In a European continent torn by incessant warfare over the centuries, Ukraine deserves sympathy for its most-abused-state status. As the real estate adage holds, "Location is everything." And Ukraine has the misfortune to be snuggled against the southeast corner of Russia, historically its prime tormentor.

Kudos to Fields

I urge anyone who might have missed it in our nano-second news cycle to read Suzanne Fields' most timely column ("Young men's lives matter, too," Web, Oct. 18). In wonderful prose, Mrs. Fields masterfully integrates California Gov. Jerry Brown's recent veto of a bill that would have codified into California law the notorious "dear colleague" false campus rape hysteria of the Obama administration, the progressive feminist media's desire to keep Harvey Weinstein on the front page in order to convince all and sundry that every man really is a Harvey in sheep's clothing, and heaps praise on Education Secretary Betsy DeVos for her clear-sighted fairness and transparency.

Taxes don't curb consumption

Walk into an inner-city kindergarten and at least half of the kids you see are going to be fat, pre-Type-2 diabetics ("Thirst prevails again in Chicago." Web, Oct. 18). In fact, a number of these kids got set up for diabetes in the womb because their mothers were following the federal food guidelines. That's right, kids can develop insulin resistance before they are born. Inner cities are full of fat people, and even some of the skinny ones have fatty livers, fatty pancreases and eventually loss of blood-sugar control, then hyperinsulinemia.

Rep. Frederica Wilson, D-Fla., talks to reporters, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, in Miami Gardens, Fla. Wilson is standing by her statement that President Donald Trump told Myeshia Johnson, the widow of Sgt. La David Johnson killed in an ambush in Niger, that her husband "knew what he signed up for." In a Wednesday morning tweet, Trump said Wilson's description of the call was "fabricated." (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

A clown in a cowboy hat

- The Washington Times

For the good of humanity -- not to mention the notion of self-governance in America -- this woman must be removed from public office.

In this May 23, 2017, file photo, Chelsea Handler arrives at the Netflix Comedy Panel For Your Consideration Event at the Netflix FYSee Space in Beverly Hills, Calif. Handler announced on Oct. 18, 2017, that she is ending her Netflix talk show after two seasons in order to focus on political activism. (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP, File)

Nancy Pelosi, Chelsea Handler: How low can you go

- The Washington Times

How low can you go -- that's the line that comes to mind while reading of House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi's recent sit-down with Chelsea Handler. Yes, that Chelsea Handler -- the one who's known 'round comedy circles as never-too-busy-to-go-vulgar.

Former U.S. President George W. Bush speaks at a forum sponsored by the George W. Bush Institute in New York, Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Bush, Obama, McCain, three peas in a cowards' pod

- The Washington Times

Once upon a time, there was a moral concept that taught if you had a problem with somebody, you went to that person directly and spoke of that matter in private -- you didn't throw darts at public walls. Then came Sen. John McCain. And in speedy order, then came George W. Bush and Barack Obama.