Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Clapper’s off-target intelligence strategy

Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper has just released a new National Intelligence Strategy, the first in five years. It’s a highly unsatisfying read for two reasons.

Illustration on the failures of tne war on poverty by Alexander hunter/The Washington Times

The War on Poverty: 50 years of failure

In January 1964, President Johnson declared “unconditional war on poverty in America.” Since then, the taxpayers have spent $22 trillion on Johnson’s war.

Illustration on the need for ground troops by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The error of relying on air power

It is the 21st-century version of the classic question once posed by The Eagles. So who you gonna’ believe: President Obama or your lyin’ eyes?

Illustration on U.S. China relations by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Russia and China, masters of mischief

The international security meeting in Paris on Monday showcased a world in fear of the growing threat that the Islamic State poses to the global order.

A large American Flag is unfurled on the Pentagon a day before the anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, Arlington, Va., Wednesday, September 10, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

CROCKER: What Patton would think of America 2014

If you took a doughboy of the Great War – say, Gen. George S. Patton – and dropped him in America today, what would he think of the country he fought to defend?

Related Articles

A voter leaves the polls in Mount Pleasant, S.C., on Tuesday, June 24, 2014, after voting in the South Carolina primary runoff. Voters across the state were deciding the GOP nominations for lieutenant governor and superintendent of education, as well as the Democratic nomination for superintendent of education. (AP Photo/Bruce Smith)

49 percent of Americans now say they would vote for a gay presidential candidate

- The Washington Times

Big majorities of Americans - about seven-out-of-10 - say they would be comfortable voting for a presidential candidate who was Protestant, Catholic, Jewish, childless or single. So says a meticulous new Harris Poll which reveals some partisan divides among other demographics. Half of the overall public - 49 percent - would be comfortable voting for a gay presidential hopeful; 36 percent of Republicans, 61 percent of Democrats and 51 percent of independents agree with that.

Illustration on Americans' irritation with Obama by Kevin Kreneck/Tribune Content Agency

Adding up the damage to America

Here are the dreary details on what's been happening in our nation's capital this week, but be forewarned: It isn't a pretty picture.

Illustration on faulty global warming science by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Boycotting the U.N. climate summit

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has sensibly declined to attend yet another climate summit — this time called by Ban Ki-moon for Tuesday in New York under the auspices of the United Nations.

Illustration on potential deadly effects of media language misuse by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

It's not execution, but murder

News media conflation of murder with execution has become deadly — to journalistic standards of accuracy.

Sen. Rob Portman of Ohio was one of three Republicans that voted to end his party's filibuster of the energy efficiency bill. Mr. Portman, who co-sponsored the bill, called its defeat "yet another disappointing example of Washington's dysfunction."

The GOP's youthful Maverick PAC set to host Portman, Cruz, Priebus

- The Washington Times

The term "maverick" used to belong to Sen. John McCain back in the day. Now it's been expanded to represent a growing batallion of young, aggressive Republicans and conservatives who are ready to rumble, and in touch with their inner maverick, or words to that effect. Founded in 2009, Maverick PAC - or MAVPAC - now boasts 2,500 members. The group gathers Friday in the nation's capital for an annual conference that has attracted a stellar line-up of speakers.

EDITORIAL: Why militarize the schools?

But peer pressure, bullying and ambition for good grades aren't the sort of minefield California's schools apparently fear most. They're getting ready for the real thing, deploying mine-resistant vehicles, or MRAPs, against the day an invading army lays a booby trap on the playground.