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President Trump. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A boffo performance on the road

- The Washington Times

The Donald finally catches a break. His trip to the Middle East was planned weeks ago, long before the sacking of James Comey and the media transformation of the voluble sackee from goat to hero. The opportunity to get out of Dodge arrived just in time.

Chart to accompany Rahn article of May 23, 2017

Population death spiral

It is hard to succeed if everyone is leaving. Some of the former communist countries are suffering from a population death spiral, with double-digit population declines over the last 25 years, as can be seen in the enclosed table.

In this May 18, 1971 file photo, political consultant Roger Ailes, who died last week, is shown in his office in New York. From communications guru and TV producer to Chairman-CEO of Fox News Channel, Ailes' used a "fair and balanced" branding approach, targeted at viewers who believed other cable-news networks, and maybe even the media overall, displayed a liberal tilt from which Fox News delivered them with "unvarnished truth." Associated Press photo

The genius of Roger Ailes

Roger Ailes was no genius, not in the league of Stephen Hawking and Albert Einstein. The founding chairman of Fox News Channel, who died last week from complications after suffering a fall, understood and respected Middle America from whence he came.

Illustration on the notion of government subsidy of nuclear power by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why nuclear power subsidies must end

Should utility bills and taxes be used to subsidize money-losing nuclear power plants so they can compete with renewable energy and low-cost natural gas?

Even the Walls have Ears Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A conversation with Condoleezza Rice

On Wednesday, I sat down with former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice to discuss her new book, “Democracy: Stories From the Long Road to Freedom.” The following transcript has been edited for length and clarity.

Un-Happy Meal From High Minimum Wage Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How a CEO misapprehends the minimum wage

Last week, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg made headlines for her Mother’s Day post calling for a minimum wage increase. “It’s long past time,” she claimed, “to raise the federal minimum wage.”

Seth Conrad Rich, a DNC staffer, was killed in July near his home in the District of Columbia. (Image via Rich's LinkedIn profile.)

The strange case of Seth Rich

- The Washington Times

This is the unfortunate story of the killing of a young man named Seth Conrad Rich, a Nebraska-born and -reared young man whose death by two gunshots has resulted in conspiracy theories of the worst kind.

Illustration on imprisoned felons on the voter rolls by Alexander hunter/The Washington Times

The ACLU’s army of ex-cons

Not content with filing nuisance lawsuits all over the country, most of them aimed at thwarting the Trump administration, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is plunging into local political campaigns.

Illustration on Trump's potential effect on economic growth by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Moving toward 3 percent growth

President Trump’s economic team paints a rosier picture about what his policies could accomplish than the economics profession is willing to endorse.

Illustration on Iran's threat to an independent Kurdistan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

An independent Kurdistan

In order to assist the creation of a Shia Crescent from the Persian Gulf to the Mediterranean Sea, the question remains: Is Iran working to thwart the creation of an independent Kurdistan? Are they working together with Syria in order to further this strategic goal? According to an Iraqi source, Iran is working to thwart the creation of an independent Kurdistan by trying to instigate a civil war among the Kurds by supporting groups opposed to Masoud Barzani. They are doing this because they perceive Kurdish autonomy in Northern Iraq to be a threat and they view the internal divisions among the Kurds to be the most effective way to destroy the dream of an independent Kurdistan for the Kurds presently are not united.

Product of Venezuela Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Cry for me, Venezuela

I often say only half-jokingly to students on college campuses who are all in with Bernie Sanders that if they think socialism is such a wonderful economic model: how about a one-way ticket to Caracas?

Higher Temperature Readings Equal More Money Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Degrading Earth’s future climate

Best practice in science is achieved through a minimum of two critical conditions: humility and perspective. If humility and perspective are ignored, science suffers.

President Donald Trump smiles as he listens to Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos, speak during a news conference in the East Room of the White House, Thursday, May 18, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Destroying Donald Trump is all that matters in the newsrooms of the mainstream media

- The Washington Times

Now anything goes. All restraints are loosened, all self-discipline trashed. There’s no cure or even treatment for Trump Derangement Syndrome, a disease as wild and as swiftly lethal as anything imported from the Ebola River valley of the dark continent. The rules and taboos that once guided even the sleaziest excuse for a newspaper no longer apply.

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Saul Bellow's politics

A POLITICAL COMPANION TO SAUL BELLOWIt is hard to overstate the importance of politics in the works of Nobel Laureate Saul Bellow. From his teenage years in high school, Bellow was a profoundly political person, deeply engaged in the ideologies and issues of his day.

Information-leaking hypocrisy

On the one hand, Democrats are outraged over President Trump's "treasonable" interactions with the Russians. On the other, their sympathetic minions in the CIA selectively leak classified material in an attempt to malign and scuttle Mr. Trump's presidency. The hypocrisy is astounding. Too busy castigating Mr. Trump and colluding to pave a path to his impeachment, the Democrats insist that the people's business wait while they conduct their witch hunts.

Hayden enhances Library

When Carla Hayden, the first woman and first African-American to become the Librarian of Congress, visited my hometown to give the commencement address to the undergraduate students at Rutgers University, Camden campus, last week, I was elated. Ms. Hayden is a first in so many ways.

FILE - In this Jan. 27, 2015 file photo, President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama stand with new Saudi King Salman bin Abdul Aziz they arrive on Air Force One at King Khalid International Airport, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Ignoring President Donald Trump's past admonition, U.S. first lady Melania Trump did not cover her head Saturday when they arrived in Saudi Arabia on the opening leg of his first international tour since taking office. Two years ago, then-citizen Trump criticized then-first lady Michelle Obama's decision to go bare-headed on a January 2015 visit with her husband. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Clockwork justice

Racial and religious discrimination is easy to allege and difficult to prove, but taking offense has become the nation's fastest growing industry. Tort lawyers tend the industry with great care and concern.

FILE - In this Nov. 28, 1967, file photo, the five Rockefeller Brothers pose for photos in New York as they gather to receive gold medals from the National Institute of social sciences. From left are: David Rockefeller, President of the Chase Manhattan Bank; Winthrop Rockefeller, Governor of Arkansas; Frank Pace, President of the NISS; John D. Rockefeller 3rd, Chairman of the Rockefeller Foundation; Nelson Rockefeller, Governor of New York; and Laurence Rockefeller, a conservation adviser to President Johnson. David Rockefeller, the billionaire philanthropist who was the last of his generation in the famously philanthropic Rockefeller family died. David Rockefeller was 101 years old. (AP Photo/File)

Tax lessons from our richest state

Soaking the rich is fun, but the rich aren't always as rich as the masses think they are. John D. Rockefeller might have used hundred-dollar bills to light his cigars, as in the popular imagination of his day, but Connecticut is learning that the supply of millionaires and hundred-dollar bills is finite.

President Donald Trump attends commencement exercises at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn., Wednesday, May 17, 2017, where he also gave the commencement address. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

The art of the Trump take-down

- The Washington Times

Taking down President Donald Trump has become an art of late -- a national past-time, like going to a baseball game, or barbecuing on the Fourth of July.

Illustration on Trump administration difficulties by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

The Comey memo

When the news broke this week that President Trump had passed highly classified information to the Russian foreign minister at a White House meeting, administration officials said the story was "false."

Coordinated Preemptive Korea Attack Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Forging a strategy for North Korea

If one consults the great strategists of the human experience such as Karl Von Clausewitz, Sun Tzu, or B.H. Liddell Hart the goal of strategy never changes: it is the application of power in order to attain a clear objective, which in the case for grand strategy could be multi-generational.

How Austen novels are 'revolutionary at their heart'

The default setting for a novel is the present day. We also have historical novels, sci-fic novels, gothic novels, and novels about other worlds -- including chicklit and Scandi Noir. We call them "genre novels" to distinguish them from mainstream fiction about believable characters and events in credible places.

Tyranny's tyranny, no matter flavor

After ratification of the Constitution, Benjamin Franklin was said to have walked out of Independence Hall and been asked by a passer-by, "What have you created?" Franklin replied, "A democracy, if you can keep it." Franklin contemporary Thomas Jefferson is credited with having said, "I hold it that a little rebellion now and then is a good thing " Franklin, Jefferson and many of the Founders were powerful thinkers on social, religious, scientific, moral and secular matters. Yet they knew they needed each other if they had any hope of their new nation surviving.

State Rep. Jody Richards, D-Bowling Green, reads a story to Head Start children at Community Action of Southern Kentucky, Thursday, May 18, 2017, in Bowling Green, Ky. (Bac Totrong/Daily News via AP)

Good First Amendment news

Sometimes there's a nugget of something good in the daily ration of bad news. A T-shirt printer in Lexington, Ky., one Blaine Adamson, won a state court ruling early this month that he was within his First Amendment rights to refuse to print an offensive message on T-shirts ordered by the Gay and Lesbian Services Organization for a "gay pride" parade.

President Donald Trump listens to Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos, left, speak during a news conference in the East Room of the White House, Thursday, May 18, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

A promise not kept

During the late, lamented campaign of 2016, when brave talk was in season, Donald Trump promised faithfully that once he was president he would take the United States out of the infamous Paris climate accord, an international agreement signed and promoted by Barack Obama that locks the United States into all kinds of anti-competitive things "to combat global climate change."