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Sheldon Adelson. (Associated Press)

Now it’s time to pay for the fun

- The Washington Times

Money is not the mother’s milk of politics, as the bundler’s cliche goes, but homemade vanilla ice cream, rich and creamy. Donald Trump hasn’t been getting any. Not much and not lately, anyway.

Saudi Handgun Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The myth of Saudi support for terrorism

Last Friday, the infamous “28 pages” from the 2002 Congressional Joint Inquiry into the 9/11 attacks were declassified. For years, this final section of the report was kept from the public, which led some to believe that it contained evidence that the Saudi Arabian government was behind the attacks, either indirectly by financing al Qaeda or directly by providing support to the actual terrorists on the planes.

Illustration of Ted Cruz as Brutus by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ted Cruz writes a political suicide note

- The Washington Times

Cleveland — As Charles Krauthammer put it, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz wrote “the longest suicide note in U.S. History,” and it was a disjointed, contradictory one that revealed a deeply conflicted and narcissistic man. A principled stand for the party and country? Hardly.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry speaks during a press conference with Britain's Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson at the Foreign Office in London, Tuesday, July 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, pool)

The nightmarish results of Muslim outreach

When President Obama entered office, he dreamed that his hope-and-change messaging and his references to his familial Islamic roots would win over the Muslim world. The soon-to-be Nobel Peace Prize laureate would make the United States liked in the Middle East. Then terrorism would decrease.

Iran Missile Factory Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s Iran delusions

July 14 was the first anniversary of President Obama’s nuclear agreement with Iran. Because the agreement renders our intelligence community deaf and blind to Iran’s nuclear weapons program, the new report from a German intelligence agency that Iran is violating the deal comes as no surprise.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton addresses the The National Education Association (NEA) Representative Assembly in Washington, Tuesday, July 5, 2016. (AP Photo/Molly Riley)

Apple polishing on the stump

Hillary Clinton took pandering to a new level when she addressed delegates to the National Education Association’s (NEA) convention on July 5.

Illustration on the loss of fighting spirit in the U.S. armed forces by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘Don’t give up the ship’

The recent release of the investigative report on the “surrender” of two U.S. Navy heavily armed, 48-foot Riverine Coastal Patrol Boats in the North Arabian Sea on Jan. 12 to slightly smaller, armed Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps Navy center-console fishing-type boats was more than an embarrassment for the Navy.

Illustration on Trump's acceptance speech by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The speech Donald Trump should give tonight to win it all

- The Washington Times

Tonight in Cleveland, Donald Trump will accept the Republican nomination for president of the United States. His ascent is the most astonishing political story of our lifetimes, and he achieved it with breathtaking fearlessness, cleverness, wit and smarts. Most importantly, he had from the start an extraordinary sixth sense of the anger, betrayal and anxiety roiling voters and driving their desire to smash the existing order.

Erdogan and the Brotherhood Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The jihadis in France, the Islamists in Turkey

Streets ran red with blood in both France and Turkey last week. A terrorist atrocity and an attempted coup are quite different events. But underlying both is this question: How are the most dynamic forces within the Islamic world shaping the 21st century?

Anti-EU Movement Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Europe’s challenge after Brexit

New surveys released this week by Britain’s EEF manufacturers’ organization and by PricewaterhouseCoopers predict that the United Kingdom’s June 23 vote to leave the European Union will result in economic slowdown. That may or may not prove true.

Election Day Turnout for Trump Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A Patrick Henry moment

In his column, “The election to terrify us all,” Wesley Pruden warns, “This might be remembered as the year when they gave an election and nobody came. The millions stayed home, the champagne went uncorked, and everybody lived in semi-misery ever after.”

Shia, Sunni and Christian Iraqis pray together in Baghdad at the site of the July 6 truck bombing, the worst such attack since 2003. Associated Press photo

Iraqis united by atrocity

The hell of jihadi terrorism is burning in the hearts of Iraqi citizens even weeks after the worst-ever terror bombing in Baghdad on July 3. The death count is now well above 300, including 172 people whose corpses could only be identified by DNA tests.

Illustration on the relationship between honor killings an Islamist terrorism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘Honor killings’ and Islamic terrorism

The world is in chaos, as Islamic violence is setting the tone with terrorism. Whether it be Orlando or Nice or the Bavarian train slasher, we’re all told it was a “lone wolf” transformed into a monster by “radicalization,” one of the left’s favorite fabricated explanations.

Related Articles

Illustration on the excess brought out in partisans at election time by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Where fools rush in

Presidential campaigns bring out the best and the worst in the American partisan. The nominating conventions evoke exuberance and awe, excessive indulgence and sometimes even quiet dignity. Some speakers express humility and others parade a supercilious arrogance.

BOOK REVIEW: 'This Brave New World: India, China and the United States'

On a crisp November morning last year, when Donald Trump's candidacy was little more than a cloud the size of a man's fist -- and the fist of a man with tiny hands, at that -- it occurred to me that if it ever did take off, a lot of its success would be due to his strongly protectionist stance on global trade.

FILE - This April 28, 2010 file photo shows the Colstrip Steam Electric Station, a coal-fired power plant in Colstrip, Mont. The Colstrip plant, a coal plant serving utility customers across the Pacific Northwest, has agreed to shut down two of its four units by 2022 under a settlement announced Tuesday, July 12, 2016, with environmentalists who sued over alleged air pollution violations. (AP Photo/Matt Brown, file)

Foolishness over fossil fuels

The masterminds who put their heads together to "improve" the planet sometimes only bump those heads together. Environmentalists have confidently -- and arrogantly -- declared that their "green" policies are based on "settled science," but evidence continues to trickle in to dispute that. On paper, saving the world is as elementary as ridding it of fossil fuels. Experience, however, teaches that "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."

Saudis no ally

We are far beyond the point at which America should have awoken to the deep and lasting deception and harm that has been the hallmark of Saudi Arabia's "friendly and cooperative" relationship with the United States ("Secret chapter of 9/11 inquiry released after 13-year wait," Web, July 15).

Removing God from U.S. life

At the Dallas memorial service for the slain police officers, President Obama declared, "We are not as divided as we seem" and "I know America," as though he were the modern father of our country. He also made reference to Scripture, including saying that we are "children of God."

Melania Trump stands at the podium during the opening day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Monday, July 18, 2016. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Melania Trump's home run

Stealing the published words of others is never a good idea, particularly in Washington, but whether it's a felony or a misdemeanor usually depends on who the sinner may be. Democrats often get by with plagiarism, Republicans usually don't.

Illustration on Republican support of Trump at the GOP convention by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Republicans hold their course

- The Washington Times

The political disaster that many predicted last week would begin here in Cleveland with a divisive rules fight, and put a fractured and dysfunctional Republican Party on display for all to see, hasn't happened.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump addresses the Republican National Convention on its second day in Cleveland, Tuesday, July 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

Promises to keep

The first requirement of leadership is the courage to take a stand against determined opposition. The Republican platform adopted at the opening of the party's National Convention in Cleveland is a firm foundation on which America can honor its exceptional heritage and build a better future. These are things that Barack Obama and the Democrats promised and failed to deliver.

BOOK REVIEW: 'A Just Cause: The Impeachment and Removal of Governor Rod Blagojevich'

In his foreword, former Illinois Gov. Jim Edgar writes: "Even in a state stained by corruption at every level of government," where three governors have gone to jail, "none had been impeached until the General Assembly, like a team of surgeons removing a cancer, urgently but methodically excised Rod Blagojevich, the state's fortieth governor."