Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Law Enforcement at the Border Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Immigration reform must start with border enforcement

As a veteran border patrol officer, I can say without any reservations that our immigration system is completely dysfunctional. Immigrants permitted to come to the United States have a cumbersome and expensive time doing so. Those who aren’t permitted to enter waltz across the border by the tens of thousands, and those not allowed to remain here elude deportations, even after committing serious crimes against our citizens.

Palestinian Hamas supporters hold up their hands while chanting Islamic slogans as masked members from the Izzedine al-Qassam Brigades, a military wing of Hamas, march with their weapons on vehicles during a rally a long the street of Rafah refugee camp, Gaza Strip, Sunday, Aug. 21, 2016. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)

The next round of Hamas vs. Israel

Words can bewitch. Soon, the seemingly benign phrase “cycle of violence,” will be applied once again to the Hamas-Israel conflict. The linguistic effect of this application will be to equate terrorism and counterterrorism, further blurring the always-essential distinction between international crime and international law enforcement.

Elmar Abdullayev, 55, stands at a gates of his home hit by shelling in a village of Gapinli, in Terter region of Azerbaijan on Tuesday, April 5, 2016. Azerbaijan and separatist forces in Nagorno-Karabakhk on Tuesday agreed on a cease-fire starting noon local time following three days of the heaviest fighting in the disputed region since 1994, the Azeri defense ministry announced. Gapanli, a village south of Terter, has been one of the hardest hit. Houses bear the marks of the recent shelling; metal doors are riddled with shrapnel, power lines are cut down, craters are seen in the yards. (AP Photo/ Hicran Babayev)

An ‘unfrozen’ conflict in Nagorno-Karabakh

Recently, one of Vladimir Putin’s foreign policy functionaries made another outrageous statement on the status of the Azerbaijani region of Nagorno-Karabakh. Evgeniy Satanovsky, the head of Russian Institute of the Near East, visited the separatist region (in contravention of international law) in mid-June and declared: “As I understand it, the issue that Karabakh is part of Azerbaijan, in terms of military logic and from the standpoint of practical politics is completely closed.”

Safety of Chromium-6 Levels in North Carolina Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Exaggerating chromium risks

Constant claims, counterclaims and accusations about coal ash contaminating surface and underground water are making North Carolinians feel like they’re watching a fast-paced tennis match. Even people with chemistry degrees must feel bewildered by assertions that parts per million or billion of chromium-6 may cause cancer.

Growing the Movement with Hate Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Black Lives Matter’s hypocritical anti-Semitism

In its new platform, Black Lives Matter (BLM) has, despite the total lack of relevance to its own agenda or interests, thrown whatever heft it has behind the anti-Semitic movement to Boycott, Divest, and Sanction (BDS) Israel. In doing so, it is inarguably contributing to the campaign to “other” the world’s only Jewish state and, with it, the Jews themselves.

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (Associated Press)

Virginia’s McAuliffe is for losers

All the fuss about Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe trying to restore voting rights to felons who have served their sentences is just fuss, nothing more. To be sure, it appears at first glance that the chief executive of the Old Dominion is really concerned about civil rights for the downtrodden.

Terrorists Present in the U.S. Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

No plan to stop foreign-born terrorists

For decades, foreign-born Islamic terrorists have been exploiting our immigration system. Almost every type of immigration has been exploited by terrorists, from temporary legal immigration to illegal immigration to humanitarian immigration.

Overheated concern about July’s warmth

Mainstream media report that July was the “hottest” month since 1880 (or as CNN wrongly reported, “ever”). And future Julys will only become hotter.

Gravesite of Main Stream Media Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The legacy media meltdown over Donald Trump

The meltdown of the American legacy media is now complete. Conservatives are sadly aware of the decline of The New York Times, the supposed “newspaper of record,” as the benchmark for legacy media in general.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks in Scranton, Pa. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

For sale, the most brazen president money can buy

- The Washington Times

It’s coming clear now why Hillary Clinton wanted her own email server, free from oversight by anyone, and why she resisted so ferociously enabling anyone from getting even a hint to what she was hiding. Her presidency, if there is one, has been sold, and a new batch of emails pried out of the government by Judicial Watch reveals the going rate for Hillary.

Gen. Jack Vessey Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A soldier’s soldier

Until he died last week at 94, former Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. John W. Vessey Jr. was a living memorial to an earlier America — where God and country were not seen as contradictions, where faith formed the bedrock of personal and national character.

Defining alcohol consumption down

With summer vacation drawing to a close, many parents are eager to pop a bottle of bubbly in celebration.

Russian President Vladimir Putin. **File (Alexei Nikolsky/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

Imperial dreams

Historically, the West has faced an existential threat from both the Persian and Russian empires. The Persian Empire was fueled by the expansionist dreams of Darius and Xerxes, foiled only by the heroism of the Greeks, led by men like Themistocles.

Related Articles

A student teacher in the second-grade classroom of teacher Susanne Diaz at Marcus Whitman Elementary School, goes over lessons with students, in Richland, Wash. (Ty Beaver/The Tri-City Herald via AP)

Saving the public schools

Teacher tenure sounds like a good idea, and maybe in the Republic of Utopia it would be. But in the real world it can invite abuse. A group of students and their parents, backed by several philanthropists in Silicon Valley, are challenging the California teacher tenure system.

The Tactics of George Soros Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Soros smear effect

Washington is not an easy-going town. You come here to argue policy with the big boys -- you should expect some rough-and-tumble. But you also should expect clean fights -- no biting, no spitting, no hitting below the belt. Whatever else divides us, we all value free speech and edifying debate, right?

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is attempting to woo black voters, but GOP campaign veterans say his efforts are too little, too late. (Associated Press)

The media make history

This week I am going to do something unusual. I am going to enter into a conversation with another columnist. Doing so was not so unusual a few decades back. Bill Buckley and James Jackson Kilpatrick did it when provoked and it was always interesting. Yet today a columnist is a godlike figure.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Underground Airlines'

''If you would write a great novel, choose a great subject," an old aphorism declares. If you would write a great "what-if," choose an unspeakable alternative to historical fact. Thus "Underground Airlines" presumes that the Civil War never happened and slavery survives in America now.

#NeverTrump = #DefinitelyHillary

The #NeverTrump movement should look to history to guide its rhetoric and voting behavior. In the 2012 presidential election, between three and five million Republicans abstained from voting, and their absence contributed to President Obama's victory.

Slippery DOJ slope

Although the police in Ferguson, Missouri, did nothing wrong in the Michael Brown shooting, they have been investigated by the FBI and will submit to monitoring by our less-than-pure Department of Justice. The same will happen in Baltimore and very likely in Milwaukee.

The climate blame began in earnest last week with former Vice President Al Gore, who described the deluge as an example of "one of the manifestations of climate change." Those remarks were followed by a rash of supportive articles. (Associated Press)

Al Gore's sugar daddy

The optimist sees the glass half full, the pessimist sees the glass half empty. George Soros sees the glass as the property of someone else so he knocks it over. By knocking it over he spills some of the dark secrets of his so-called Open Society Foundation, revealing how his vast fortune promotes misfortune in America.

Only Trump helping

Wildfires in California have destroyed 96 homes and displaced 80,000 people. Flooding in Louisiana has damaged 40,000 homes and 86,000 people have already applied for federal disaster aid. Meanwhile the soon-to-be former president is vacationing in Martha's Vineyard, partying and playing round after round of golf.

Agents best bet for new plans

"Aetna deals latest blow to Obamacare, pulls out of most markets" reported that in 2017 Aetna, one of the nation's largest health insurers, will sell exchange plans in just four states, down from 15 states this year ("Aetna deals latest blow to Obamacare, pulls out of most markets," Web, Aug. 15).

In this photo taken on Aug. 18, 2016, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to media as she meets with law enforcement leaders at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Hillary and treason

In a remarkably shameless appearance Sunday, Clinton campaign manager Robby Mook told ABC News that "real questions are being raised" about whether Donald Trump "is just a puppet for the Kremlin in this race." Young Mr. Mook, like many of his generation ignorant of the history of his country, should be in serious trouble.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Wear and Tear: The Threads of My Life'

If there was a more dysfunctional marriage than the one between British critic and enfant terrible Kenneth Tynan and American writer Elaine Dundy, you wouldn't want to know about it, let alone be caught up in its maelstrom.