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Illustration on accurately identifying Islamist terror by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Freedom, security — and the truth

With blizzards, deflated footballs and green-lipsticked YouTube personalities dominating recent news, it was easy to miss two hugely important truth-telling moments. If only they had received the same coverage as air pressure in NFL regulation footballs.

A New York City snowplow, loaded with salt, sits parked in midtown Manhattan as light snow falls, Monday, Jan. 26, 2015. Northeast residents are girding for a heavy snowstorm that could bury communities from northern New Jersey to southern Maine in up to 2 feet of snow. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Another snow job

Today, politicians and their ideological fellow travelers in the media use the normal cycles of the seasons to promote “climate change.”

Illustration on the failed policy of enemy combatant internment by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The al-Marri enigma

Ali Saleh al-Marri is a convicted conspirator who entered the United States before Sept. 11, 2001, in order to create a dreaded sleeper cell here that might someday launch an attack on Americans similar to what we witnessed earlier this month in Paris. When the feds woke from their slumber on Sept. 11, they wisely began to search immigration records for persons who came here with no discernible purpose from places known to spawn terrorist groups and who had overstayed their visas. Al-Marri was one such person.

Illustration on heroism replaced by narcissism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Heroes in the age of the selfie

Heroes, real ones, are getting harder to find. One of the few remaining annual surprises in the typical State of the Union address is the president’s introduction of his “mystery guest.” President Reagan introduced the first one in 1982, celebrating one Leonard Skutnik for an extraordinary act of courage.

Conservatism has blossomed into the major intellectual and political force of our time. (Rod Lamkey Jr/ The Washington Times)

Conservatism is now everywhere

There is a problem with the Internet. Its commentary is too often dominated by pinheads. H.L. Mencken used to complain that only idiots write letters to the editor. That might have been true of his day — the 1920s and 1930s — but in our time writers of letters to the editor of newspapers and even of websites are occasionally quite well-informed and even lucid. But others, I am afraid, are indeed pinheads, sitting in their underwear back home, foaming at the mouth, believing that the whole world is profoundly interested in their every word, until the authorities arrive at their homes to take them away.

Illustration on threatened government meddling in the private sector world of sports by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Jumping offsides on ‘Deflategate’

Super Bowl XLIX (49) will be played this Sunday. Sadly, the anticipated matchup between the AFC champion New England Patriots and NFC champion Seattle Seahawks has already had the wind knocked out of its sails — or, in this case, the air out of its footballs.

The Democratic assault on free speech

- The Washington Times

Everybody’s for free speech — until somebody says something he doesn’t like. But the genius of the First Amendment is that it is so direct and plain that even a lawyer or a judge can understand it.

Illustration on the Obama administrations role in Iranian nuclear ambitions by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Iran’s price for Obama’s coveted legacy

The importance of any political event is best measured against its opponents’ reactions. By that yardstick, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s agreement to speak about the dangers of Iran’s pursuit of nuclear weapons before a joint session of Congress is already enormously significant.

Illustration on American's diminished economic freedom by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Regaining lost economic freedom

If you were to rank all the countries of the world based on their level of economic freedom, you’d think the United States would be a shoo-in for first place, right? Surely we would be at least somewhere in the top five.

Illustration on the fall of Yemen by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Yemen’s collapse demonstrates Obama’s foreign policy failures

Last Tuesday night, President Obama assured the American people that their nation is secure because of his leadership. His “steady, persistent resolve,” Mr. Obama proclaimed in his State of the Union speech, has resulted in a “safer, more prosperous world.”

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Getting your Ducks in a Row Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A path to the White House or oblivion

- The Washington Times

As John Sears prepared to wing his way west for a 1975 meeting with former California Gov. Ronald Reagan at which he intended to convince Reagan to hire his team to run Reagan's 1976 campaign against President Gerald R. Ford, I asked him what made him think that Reagan would turn things over to him. Mr. Sear's answer proved prophetic. He said, "because he's had a hundred people tell him that he ought to be president, but I'll be the first to tell him how to do it."

Illustration on President Obama's fantasy State of the Union address by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When politics defies reality

In his recent State of the Union address, President Obama was very upbeat and inspiring, particularly if a listener had no prior knowledge of his many speeches that were quite similar but bore no fruit. It almost appeared that he was living in an alternate universe that bore no resemblance to present day America and the current global stage.

When lies lead to murder

This riveting book is a compelling read not only for correcting a much-mythologized era, but also for reminding us of the harsh and often crass realities that influence all our presidents when they get blindsided by the unintended consequences of their acts.

Make ‘drug-free’ more than slogan

The Berlin Wall divided the city of Berlin into east and west. As such it restricted progress of the city. Like the Berlin Wall, a wall of denial about employee drug use exists in local school systems. Also like the Berlin Wall, drug use restricts progress. However, unlike the Berlin Wall which was constructed of stone, the wall in the local school systems is constructed of marijuana, cocaine and other drugs.

Illustration on the effectiveness of sonograms in deterring the choice to abort by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A GOP abortion bill shouldn't resemble a 'war on women'

As thousands descended on Washington last week for the annual March for Life, the Republican House of Representatives was busy watering down an anti-abortion bill that restricted abortions after 20 weeks, except in cases of rape or incest, with exemptions allowed only after a police report had been filed. This after a small group of moderate Republican female lawmakers challenged the bill and lobbied for a less restrictive measure.

Ali Khamenei, the mullah who is the supreme leader of Iran, tells his Twitter followers that "This barbaric, wolflike & infanticidal regime of #Israel which spares no crime has no cure but to be annihilated." (AP Photo/Office of the Iranian Supreme Leader, File)

Playing the fool’s game

The clock is ticking on efforts to halt Iran's quest for the bomb, and time is running out. When it does, the folly of allowing a rogue state to threaten the Middle East — and the world — with the bomb will be exposed in stark and horrifying relief. Neville Chamberlain was the face of appeasement in the 20th century; Barack Obama would be that face in the 21st.

Illustration on President Obama's fictional record by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The president’s fictional record

If you were a librarian, would you put President Obama's recently delivered State of the Union address in the fiction or nonfiction section? All presidents puff their accomplishments and gloss over their failures, but no previous president has been so blatant in just making up "facts" and numbers that are so disconnected from reality.

Stop U.S. self-disarmament

Common estimates of the number of privately owned guns in the United States are between 300 million and 310 million. No one really knows the exact number, and these figures include both legally and illegally owned firearms.

The truth about communists in Hollywood

At last. After more than a half-century there is now available a book that thoroughly discredits all the movie industry protestations that there were no Communists in filmmaking during and after World War II, when in fact there were hundreds.

A woman waves a Greek flag during a speech by the leader of Syriza left-wing party Alexis Tsipras outside Athens University Headquarters, Sunday, Jan. 25, 2015. A triumphant Alexis Tsipras told Greeks that his radical left Syriza party's win in Sunday's early general election meant an end to austerity and humiliation and that the country's regular and often fraught debt inspections were a thing of the past. "Today the Greek people have made history. Hope has made history," Tsipras said in his victory speech at a conference hall in central Athens. (AP Photo/Fotis Plegas G.)

Now Greeks should dump the Euro

Since 2008, the Greek economy has shrunk by 25 percent, and the stock market is down more than 80 percent.

A New York snow scene following a major blizzard..  (AP Photo/The Syracuse Newspapers, David Lassman)

The Manhattan snow storm: A rush of 'blizzard buddies' - and the Great Kale Panic of '15

- The Washington Times

Only in New York, perhaps? As snow falls and gale force winds howl down city streets, some residents of the Big Apple now seek "blizzard buddies." That's right. They don't want to face Winter Storm Juno alone. Scores of romance-minded New Yorkers have taken to Craigslist with unapologetic invitations for companionship, amour and cocoa - among many other things.

Fool’s errand to expect Cuba change

George Santayana got it right when he said, "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." President Obama's latest move to normalize diplomatic and trade relations with the brutal Cuban regime with little or no guarantee of anything much in return will only empower and enrich the communist leaders even more.

A college or university degree is not the only route to happiness and success. (AP Photo/Susanne Schafer)

The community college illusion

Two years at a "free" community college may seem appealing to young people, fearful of the future and looking for a route to prosperity, but they will be the first to feel disappointment in President Obama's illusionary community-college-for-all scheme. His proposed $60 billion educational subsidy will inevitably diminish the quality of faculties, prevent promising students from obtaining a suitable education, and do little to provide an entryway into the job market. A college or university degree is not the only route to happiness and success.