Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Colin Kaepernick (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The killer wind from Hurricane Donald

- The Washington Times

They said it couldn’t be done, and even if it could, Donald Trump wouldn’t be the man to do it. But a fresh wind from somewhere is blowing through the jungle where the timid, the fearful and the politically correct cower in the shade of the no-no tree.

Illustration on government regulatory obstacles to infrastructure construction by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The national infrastructure dilemma

President-elect Donald Trump has proposed as one of his legislative priorities a $1 trillion national infrastructure program (“Trump’s infrastructure program,” Nov. 28).

Illustration on Boeing's coming future under a Trump administration by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The art of the Boeing deal

- The Washington Times

Consider President-elect Donald Trump’s tweet threatening to cancel Boeing’s contract for Air Force One the first a shot across the bow in an upcoming battle with the aerospace company.

Illustration on Saudi Arabia's growing troubles by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Saudi Arabia’s uncertainties

OPEC member’s decision last week to cut oil output won’t help Saudi Arabia in the long term. The kingdom problems run far deeper and even at $50 a barrel, it will face a large deficit requiring more borrowing and subsidies cuts that will bring more pain on a population accustomed to easy life.

FILE - In this Nov. 19, 2016 file photo, President-elect Donald Trump walks with CKE Restaurants CEO Andy Puzder from Trump National Golf Club Bedminster clubhouse in Bedminster, N.J. Trump is expected to add another wealthy business person and elite donor to his Cabinet, with fast food executive Andrew Puzder as Labor secretary. In the background is Vice President-elect Mike Pence. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

A pro-jobs Labor Secretary

Andy Puzder knows what works and doesn’t work in the real marketplace for labor.

In this Sunday, Nov. 13, 2016, photo, a U.S. Customs and Border Patrol agents pass a section of border wall in Hidalgo, Texas. The idea of a concrete wall spanning the entire 1,954-mile southwest frontier collides head-on with multiple realities, like a looping Rio Grande, fierce local resistance, and cost. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

Taking back the border

Donald Trump may have shocked the world when he was elected president of the United States, but Latino voters proved to be an even bigger surprise. Election Day exit polling showed that Mr. Trump gained 2 percent more Latino voters than Mitt Romney did in 2012, winning a total 29 percent of 13 million Latino voters.

Illustration on the Obama legacy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Time

Assessing the Obama legacy

In his 2016 State of the Union address, President Obama summarized his achievements. That same night, the White House issued a press release touting Mr. Obama’s accomplishments.

Choose Your Fuel at the Pump Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Rethinking the ethanol standard

President-elect Donald Trump cruised to victory promising to get rid of the mandate to buy health insurance. While he’s at it, how about getting rid of the mandate to buy ethanol?

Chattering Filibuster Teeth Unhinged Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Disabling Senate filibuster abuse

Voters might justifiably assume that having now gained control of Congress and the White House, Republicans have complete power to enact all campaign promises in the last election. But without changes to the filibuster, Senate minority Democrats can still block Republican reforms.

Europe's Recent Elections Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Europe’s epochal elections

“The novelty and magnitude of Europe’s predicament make it difficult to understand, tempting to overlook, and nearly impossible to predict. Europe marches us all into terra incognita.” That’s how I closed an article 10 years ago on the topic of Islam’s future in Europe.

The key to engaging with Hispanics

I was reminded this week of 1980, when my father — who was the founder of a national organization representing the interests of Hispanic business owners — got involved with the presidential election in order to support Ronald Reagan.

Illustration on drug use in America by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

How to end America’s drug crisis

As President Trump prepares to confront multiple crises, including national security, foreign policy, and immigration, another crisis looms. It kills tens of thousands of young Americans annually, inflicting unparalleled suffering on American families.

Illustration on matching tax cuts with cuts in government spending by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A model for making tax cuts work

Before President-elect Donald Trump has fully fleshed out his policy agenda, House Republicans are already planning to slam through Congress their own program of repealing Obamacare, repealing regulations Barack Obama issued in the last 60 legislative days of his administration, and enacting substantial tax cuts.

Hirohito Flag Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The incomplete legacy of Pearl Harbor

After 75 years, there are still so many stories about the attack on Pearl Harbor by the Japanese on Dec. 7, 1941, including the tragic loss of more than 2,300 American servicemen, the destruction of 18 ships, the loss of over 150 aircraft and even the element of surprise on that Sunday morning.

Related Articles

Trump must cut China's tentacles

President-elect Donald Trump needs to re-examine President Obama's crumbling pipe-dream policy of using Vietnam to contain China. While our Southeast-Asia policy has myopically focused on China's growing occupation of and base construction on the South China Sea Islands, China has made a Hail Mary pass and outflanked Vietnam by building a new deep-water port in Cambodia.

A congressional aide said the legislation is aimed to thwart U.S. spy agencies from giving secrets to an investigation of NSA activities by a German parliamentary committee. The panel was formed after spying disclosures from renegade NSA contractor Edward Snowden. (Associated Press)

Pardon me, please

Politeness is always welcome, but it's not owing to an outbreak of good manners that President Obama is hearing a barrage of "pardon me." Rather, it's a sign that a president is soon to leave the White House, taking with him his power and authority to grant clemency to those on the nation's naughty list.

Illustration on Donald Trump, Israel and Middle East Peace by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

U.S.-Israel relations on the mend

The consensus in Israel is that the relationship between the Jewish state and the United States is going to improve in a Trump administration, says former Israeli ambassador to the U.S., Zalman Shoval.

Joel Cazares, left, of Santa Ana, Calif., of Building Healthy Communities joins other immigration rights activists in a news conference in front of Santa Ana city hall in Santa Ana on Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2016, to voice their support for Santa Ana becoming a sanctuary city. The move comes after Trump campaigned on promises to build a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border and calls for tougher immigration enforcement. (Paul Rodriguez/The Orange County Register via AP)

Are sanctuary cities legal?

Last week, President-elect Donald Trump re-emphasized the approach he will take in enforcing the nation's immigration laws, which is much different from the manner of enforcement utilized by President Obama.

The problem with all that ethanol is where to pour it.

Elected Democrats are criticizing President-elect Trump's Cabinet nominees for their supposed lack of experience ("Donald Trump picks Ben Carson, former campaign rival, as housing secretary," Web, Dec. 5). Sen. Jeff Merkley, Oregon Democrat, complains that Dr. Ben Carson, nominee for secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, "has no professional experience in either government or housing policy."

On 75th anniversary, remember Nimitz

For Pearl Harbor, the Japanese forged a strategic weapon of six heavy carriers for a coordinated attack by 360 planes on Sunday, on Dec. 7, 1941. Never before had any country executed or planned a raid by more than two carriers on any naval or land target.

This Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2015 photo shows a street sign in front of a corn field at an uncontrolled rural intersection where a driver was killed in an August crash near Maxwell, Iowa. Corn grows up to 12 feet tall and this time of year can be a serious hazard for motorists in rural areas of the Midwest. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Draining the ethanol tank

Red may be the color of Donald Trump's America, but yellow is the color of the nation's most favored cash crop. Corn is good, especially sweet corn swathed in butter for supper on a gentle summer's night. Mules like field corn, and so they should.

Retired Marine Corps Gen. James Mattis stands backstage as he waits to be announced by President-elect Donald Trump as his Defense Secretary at a rally at the Crown Coliseum in Fayetteville, N.C., Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

A job for a mad dog

Like nearly all government agencies, the Defense Department wastes money faster than the taxpayers can earn it, and a study by the Pentagon proves it. The study reveals that nearly one in every four dollars the Pentagon gets is wasted while generals, admirals and their friends in Congress cry for more, lest the nation be left defenseless in a hostile world.

Illustration on Bob Dylan's being awarded the Nobel Prize for literature by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How Bob Dylan copped a Nobel

When I heard that Bob Dylan had received the Nobel Prize for literature, I was mildly surprised. He writes music, popular music. As did George Gershwin and Irving Berlin, both of whom almost certainly wrote better music.