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FILE - In this July 9, 2015 file photo, a Wall Street sign is seen near the New York Stock Exchange in New York. U.S. stocks moved lower on the last day of the year as the market headed for a sluggish end to 2015. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

Who is best to reform Wall Street?

In order to reform the financial industry, the next President needs to understand what the fixes should be or risk an overreaction that makes the excesses worse.

Arrogant Iranian Actions Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Iranian arrogance

Iran’s recent capture of two U.S. Navy 47-foot Riverine Command Boats (RCBs) that were on a routine transit from Kuwait to Bahrain on January 12 is another example of the arrogance and contempt Iran holds for America and our political leadership.

Illustration on deporting persons who have overstayed their visas by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A fresh approach to the immigration conundrum

Our broken immigration system has been bad for the country and a source of political division for well over a decade. Some want a so-called “comprehensive” solution to the crisis, but the prospects for it actually happening (let alone being a solution) are not good amid our divisions. It’s time to rise above the existing gridlock and build a national consensus based on national security.

Illustration on the costs of green energy by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Unearthing an all-of-the-above energy approach

Last month in his final State of the Union Address, President Obama abandoned his belief in an “all-of-the-above” approach to energy policy — one that blends the use of emerging and established energy resources for the American people and the American economy.

Crisis in Civic Education Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

College ignorance and the threat to liberty

Media outlets around the country have reported that 10 percent of college graduates think Judith Sheindlin — better known as TV’s “Judge Judy” — is a member of the U.S. Supreme Court. Behind this embarrassing yet hilarious finding is the fact that there is a serious crisis in American higher education.

Illustration on the West's failure to take Muslim culture seriously by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Islamist wears Dolce & Gabbana

In the “culture” section of the venerable Atlantic magazine last month, there was a news item I wouldn’t want you to miss: “The Italian fashion house Dolce & Gabbana has just launched a line of hijabs (headscarves) and abayas (cloaks) in the label’s signature playful, theatrical aesthetic.”

Illustration on the need for a new U.S. military rifle by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Obama’s search for a ‘safe’ gun

Just after the Battle of Gettysburg, Christopher Spenser, inventor of a revolutionary repeating rifle, escorted Abraham Lincoln out to the East Lawn of the White House to do a bit of target shooting. Lincoln was so impressed that he ordered Gen. James Ripley, the Army’s chief of ordnance, to purchase tens of thousands of Spenser’s repeaters at once and issue them to soldiers.

Illustration on rape and Muslim cultural practices by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Arab rape game

Lobbing firecrackers into the crowd gathered in the square outside Cologne’s cathedral on New Year’s Eve, a thousand-strong violent flash mob of Middle Eastern and North African Muslim men then took their celebration to the next level, breaking into smaller groups and isolating German women to rob, grope, fondle and in two cases (so far), rape them.

President Barack Obama speaks at the Righteous Among the Nations Award Ceremony at the Israeli Embassy in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Obama’s Holocaust remembrance

Chutzpah is one of those Yiddish words that defy exact definition. Merriam Webster lists synonyms like “audacity,” “nerve,” “cheek” and “gall.”

Related Articles

The Failure of Multiculturalism Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The failure of multiculturalism

Just as radar warns of approaching storms, so does the flood of migrants entering Europe warn us of a deluge yet to come, not only for Europeans, if they continue to allow unrestricted immigration, but for the United States.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a rally at Abraham Lincoln High School in Council Bluffs, Iowa, Sunday, Jan. 31, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Compromising national security

This has not been a good week for Hillary Clinton. She prevailed over Sen. Bernie Sanders in the Iowa Democratic presidential caucuses by less than four-tenths of 1 percent of all votes cast, after having led him in polls in Iowa at one time by 40 percentage points.

Illustration on winning the hearts of voters by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Making free with a vote in New Hampshire

Votes are stubborn little things. Votes have none of the sparkle and shine of some of the campaign rhetoric. Votes don't soar, they sink in. Votes are precious and deeply felt by the man and woman who casts one, but the candidates stop catering to votes as soon as they're cast.

Dislike of Cruz just anger

As an intermediate-school teacher, I know that it is usually the best teachers who are the most disliked by the unsuccessful, unproductive students. These teachers don't take the easy path of avoiding the confrontation caused by attempting to correct the failure-producing attitudes of such students. Rather, they accept the disdain they receive for seeking to improve poor academics.

Freedom, liberty not party issues

I think most Americans believe that our three branches of government have lately failed to live up to their responsibilities to the people of this country.

Oregon State Police man a roadblock at the intersection of highways 395 and 20 outside of Burns, Ore., Wednesday morning, Jan. 27, 2016. Authorities were restricting access on Wednesday to the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge headquarters being occupied by an armed group after one of the occupiers was killed during a traffic stop and eight more, including the group's leader Ammon Bundy, were arrested. (Dave Killen/The Oregonian via AP)

Western ways matter

There's nothing like a fatal shooting to rile a community. The chain of events that led to the death of a rebellious rancher along a country road in Oregon last week is still under investigation, but for Americans who yearn for the wide-open spaces of the West, freedom's last refuge, the tragedy spells oppression. To them, Western lives matter.

Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., speaks at a town hall in Sioux City, Iowa, Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

The scramble for the top

The Iowa caucuses rarely produce the winner in November, but they always produce panic in the camps of the losers. It's an exaggeration to say the caucuses Monday night decided anything but temporary winners, but winning is always better than losing.

Illustration on the Clinton "curse" by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Clinton Curse returns

In the many decades I have had the pleasure of covering the Clintons I have developed several themes about them that have over the years been validated by fact. One theme is that there is a Clinton Curse.

Diplomacy Based on Human Rights Perceptions Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A flawed U.S. approach to young democracies

During the mid-1970s, President Jimmy Carter began tying U.S. cooperation with other nations as much to Washington's perception of their human-rights records as to the strategic interests of the United States.