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Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton gives an acceptance speech after accepting the Trailblazer Award during the LGBT Community Center Dinner at Cipriani Wall Street on Thursday, April 20, 2017, in New York. (AP Photo/Kevin Hagen) ** FILE **

The Democratic Party’s ‘Gong Show’

Finally, the Democrats admit it wasn’t the Russians, James B. Comey or sexism that brought Hillary Clinton down. We are now told by journalists, leading Democrats, and even a former Democratic presidential candidate, that it was the inept dysfunction of the party itself, Hillary, and her abused and frightened team that has reduced them all to irrelevant, vapid political busybodies.

FILE - In this March 18, 2017 file photo, Congressional candidate Rob Quist meets with supporters during the annual Mansfield Metcalf Celebration dinner hosted by the state's Democratic Party in Helena, Montana. He is trying to fire up the party faithful in his race against Republican Greg Gianforte in a May 25 special election to fill Montana's sole congressional seat. (AP Photo/Bobby Caina Calvan, File)

Hiding his socialism beneath a cowboy hat

- The Washington Times

Fresh from special election defeats in Kansas and Georgia, Democratic professionals and activists alike are focusing on the election to fill Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s Montana congressional seat as one more chance to chip away at the Republican majority in the House.

Afghanistan Peace Plan Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Resolving the Afghanistan crisis

The U.S.-led war in Afghanistan has not only continued unabated for over 15 years, making it America’s longest war, but has no end in sight.

In this April 25, 2017 photo provided by ABC 7 Eyewitness News in New York, a wooden hammock lay on the sidewalk in New York. Police say that an tourist from England was injured and taken to the hospital when the hammock fell from the building she was talking near and struck her. Police believe wind may have blown the wooden framed hammock off the building's terrace. (ABC 7 Eyewitness News via AP)

Taking the cuffs off the cops

The Obama Justice Department made a habit of federalizing local police forces by threatening litigation and securing a settlement in the form of a consent decree. That turned out to be an exercise in anti-police bias which, happily, Attorney General Jeff Sessions is now reversing.

Marine Le Pen (Associated Press)

The status quo survives in France, but in ruins

- The Washington Times

The French easily embrace contradiction and chaos. It’s what makes their politics work: “Plus ca change, plus c’est la meme chose,” and they said it first: “The more things change, the more they stay the same.” The Sunday national election in France proved it again.

Unrest in Venezuela Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Venezuela’s coming civil war

- The Washington Times

As American public attention has been focusing on terror attacks in Paris, the crisis in Syria and the nuclear-armed lunatic running North Korea, Venezuela to our south is about to explode into violence and civil war with incalculable consequences in our own hemisphere.

Ivanka Trump, listens as her father President Donald Trump, talks via a video conference to astronauts on the International Space Station, Monday, April 24, 2017, from the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

100 days of the GOP eating its own

- The Washington Times

It’s rounding on 100 days of the President Donald Trump administration — and surprise, surprise, it’s not just Democrats who are pointing wild fingers at the White House for this and that, for what have you and what not. criticizing, condemning and generally crying about how things are progressing. It’s Republicans, almost as much.

Illustration on the consequences of questioning current conventional wisdom by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Shut up and go away

Columbia University, from which I have a degree, has set aside rooms where straight white males — like me — are told they are unwelcome. How should I respond to their annual fund drives?

Illustration on the recent Paris terror attack and the French national elections by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The police vs. the PC police

As is almost always the case, signs of trouble preceded the latest shooting in Paris, which left one police officer dead and wounded two bystanders before police killed the gunman, later identified as French national Karim Cheurfi, a known criminal with a long, violent record. ISIS claimed to be behind the attack. According to police, a note praising ISIS fell out of Cheurfi’s pocket when he fell.

Better-educated Immigrants Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

One-upping Donald Trump’s crackdown on immigration

President Trump’s crackdown on immigrants committing crimes and employers abusing H-1B visas to replace qualified Americans with low-wage foreign workers may be welcome. However, those fall far short of the comprehensive reform needed to better align immigration policy with the needs of the country.

FILE - In this March 22, 2017, file photo, Antonio Reyes of Brownsville, Texas, stands by the U.S.-Mexico border fence near his home. Reyes said he's seen people scale the border fence that bisects his backyard and jump down in seconds. Sometimes they carry bales of what appear to be drugs. A higher wall is "still not going to stop them," he said. "They'll shotput it or whatever they have to do." (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)

Protecting our southern border with U.S. mariners

As chairman of the Coast Guard and Maritime Subcommittee in the House of Representatives, I am proud to be an unwavering defender of the Jones Act — a critical U.S. national security law that requires vessels moving from one U.S. port to another must be U.S.-built and U.S.-crewed.

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President Donald Trump walks past China's Ambassador to the United Nations Liu Jieyi, right, and National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster as he arrives for a working lunch with ambassadors of countries on the United Nations Security Council, Monday, April 24, 2017, in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Making government perform for Americans

Throughout the presidential campaign, Trump supporters were asked what drew them to their preferred candidate. Time and again, they pointed to his "outsider" status. Fed up with conventional politicians, they decided to take a chance on someone different -- someone likely to shake things up.

In this Wednesday, May 18, 2016, photo, the Home Depot logo appears on a credit card reader at a Home Depot store in Bellingham, Mass. The Home Depot Inc. says in a new federal lawsuit that Visa and MasterCard are using security measures prone to fraud, putting it and other retailers at risk of hacking attacks by cyber thieves. Atlanta-based Home Depot says new payment cards with so-called "chip" technology, rolled out in the U.S. in recent years, remain less secure than cards used in Europe and elsewhere in the world. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

A Trump supporter worth listening to

Like the old E.F. Hutton commercials, there are some people who, when talking, are worth stopping what you're doing and paying attention. Mr. Marcus, the co-founder of The Home Depot, which revolutionized the hardware store industry, is one of those people. His recent endorsement of President Trump's achievements during his first 100 days as president is worth considering and echoing.

A local resident holds a sign as he listens to Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speak at a rally for Omaha Democratic mayoral candidate Heath Mello, Thursday, April 20, 2017, in Omaha, Neb. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Riding the tiger

"He who rides a tiger is afraid to dismount," a Chinese proverb cautions the unwary. That's where the Democrats, flailing in a search for a way out of the wilderness, find themselves in their warm embrace of Trump Derangement Syndrome.

GOP, speak up on costs

The Republican Party is failing to articulate key facts, primarily financial, affecting proposed and operative major legislation. This is akin to a bank failing to inform a customer that a credit card has been maxed out.

FILE -- In this Jan. 16, 2017 file photo, Richard Ratcliffe, husband of imprisoned charity worker Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, poses for the media during an Amnesty International led vigil outside the Iranian Embassy in London. The family of Zaghari-Ratcliffe who was detained in Iran while on a trip with her toddler daughter says all efforts to appeal her five-year prison sentence in court have failed. Ratcliffe, who works for the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of the news agency, found out this weekend that her appeal to Iran's supreme court failed. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant, File)

Addicted to uranium

When gentlemen compete, they honor the rules of the game and accept the referee's calls. But no one would mistake the rulers of the Islamic Republic of Iran for gentlemen, and their gamesmanship in pursuing nuclear weapons is deadly serious. As the mullahs make a bid for more uranium, They have been called out for cheating. The United States is obliged to withhold approval of a new supply of the radioactive material until the regime can prove it's not up to mischief. Anything else is simply tomfoolery.

No freedom on liberal campuses

"Wellesley students advocate hostility on campuses to silence conservative 'hate speech'" (Web, April 20) exposes the eerily Orwellian nature of the events unfolding in our institutions of "higher learning." At Wellesley College, the case is being made for using force and violence to stifle the free speech of those who "refuse to adapt their beliefs." In February, students rioted and set fires at the University of California, Berkeley, to prevent an appearance by conservative personality Milo Yiannopoulos.

Every president must have 'his own SOB'

Chris Whipple, a documentary filmmaker and award-winning TV producer, is a talented journalist who has interviewed all 17 living chiefs of staff as well as numerous people who served with them. His prose is clear, crisp and often evocative, and for the most part his observations ring true as he tracks the development of the office.

In this Saturday, Feb. 11, 2017, file photo, U.S. President Donald Trump, right, listens to Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe as they make statements about North Korea at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File) ** FILE **

North Korea must be dealt with

- The Washington Times

North Korea, long a thorn in the side of America -- a thorn that sharpened considerably under the "strategic patience"-slash-do-nothing leadership of Barack Obama -- has seized a third American citizen. And the regime must be dealt an aggressive blow.