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Centennial High School senior Doyle Trout, left, and his classmates react as his childhood and high school photographs appear on the screen during the senior slide show during graduation on Saturday, May 16, 2015. Trout, a four-time state wrestling champion who lost his left leg in an accident, is going to the University of Wyoming on a wrestling scholarship. Wyoming is honoring Trout's scholarship, and he hopes to wrestle again someday but doing that won't be easy.(Francis Gardler/The Journal-Star via AP) LOCAL TELEVISION OUT; KOLN-TV OUT; KGIN-TV OUT; KLKN-TV OUT

What I know: advice for the real world

Make the face you show the world—in interviews, on the job, socially and professionally—the reflection of what’s in your heart and mind.

Paula Jones smiles during a news conference in Dallas, in this April 16, 1998, file photo. Encouraged by an outside lawyer, Paula Jones is ready to insist on $2 million, half from President Clinton and half from a New York tycoon, in exchange for dropping her sexual harassment lawsuit, two legal sources involved in the case said Saturday, Oct. 17, 1998. (AP Photo/LM Otero) ** FILE **

Paula Jones: Reprise of a famous bimbo eruption

- The Washington Times

For the Republicans, worthy or not, Hillary and Bubba are the gift that keeps on giving. Whoever is responsible for writing the thank-you notes has a big job ahead. The dynamic duo keep a network of warehouses just to house and keep track of the gifts. No wonder Hillary needs her own Internet server.

Illustration on the move to remove Andrew Jackson from the twenty dollar bill by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The cheap currency of judging historical figures by today’s standards

New York Times columnist Gail Collins is on a tear. Her sense of civic rectitude oozes from her prose. Her characteristic breezy haughtiness is on full display. The moral imperative that has caught her fancy and led to two columns in as many months: Getting that angular-faced Andrew Jackson off the $20 bill and replacing him with a woman, preferably an African-American or American Indian.

Illustration on Net Neutrality by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

New rules make the Internet’s future look very 20th century

Like a thief in the night, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) recently denied eight separate petitions requesting the agency delay the implementation of new Internet regulations while they are challenged in court. While the late-afternoon news dump and decision was predictable, it is no less disappointing that the Internet will soon be subjected to 20th century telephone monopoly-era regulations.

No substitute for seriousness in Iraq

A recent weekend brought two very different dispatches from the front lines of the global war on terror. The first was a tale of tactical success; the second a narrative of strategic failure.

Positive Messages Hit the Mark Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Conservatism, the Chevy of American leadership

Imagine General Motors trying to sell you a Chevy truck by airing an ad featuring a Ford F-150 pickup truck bursting into flames, killing a family of four and ending with anguished relatives waiting for news of their loved ones in a hospital emergency room.

Illustration on adjusting Section 215 of the Patriot Act by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Amending the Patriot Act, not ending it

The Senate, which will never be known for an overly demanding work schedule, returns from its week-long recess a whole day early to deal with the mess being made of one of our most important anti-terrorist intelligence programs. That program, now encompassed by Section 215 of the unfortunately named Patriot Act, has its roots in the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978, or FISA.

Illistration on adjusting Export-Import bank policies by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A Reaganesque solution to the Ex-Im Bank dilemma

Opposition to the U.S. Export-Import Bank (Ex-Im) is now at the point where the bank’s reauthorization is genuinely in doubt. Spurred by accusations of corporate welfare, crony capitalism and outright corruption, opponents believe the Ex-Im Bank’s palpable violation of free-market principles fully warrants its early demise.

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Rodgers and Hart before Hollywood

Even the most talented composer of songs is lucky if he can find one lyricist as a collaborator, but Richard Rodgers was blessed with two great ones, first Lorenz Hart and then Oscar Hammerstein.

President Obama will ask Congress for $2 billion to deal with the crisis that has seen thousands of unaccompanied children, mostly from Central America, illegally surge across the U.S.-Mexico border.  (AP Photo/Eric Gay, Pool)

Disorder on the border

Texas is flooded, and it's not just the water. The state has been inundated with illegal immigrants surging across its border, egged on by President Obama's unprecedented grant of amnesty to millions who have no right to be here. Though powerless to stop the rain, a federal court has reinforced a legal barrier meant to stem the flow of humanity that threatens chaos in Texas and other border states. The tide of lawlessness may be turning.

Policing for profit

Reform of civil-forfeiture laws is an idea whose time has come. This is an issue that unites conservatives and liberals, Republicans and Democrats. FreedomWorks, on the right, and the Center for American Progress, on the left, invited writers, bloggers and think-tank analysts to a daylong conference the other day to talk about abuses of civil-forfeiture, which the Heritage Foundation rightly calls "a legal tool that allows law enforcement officials to seize property that they assert has been involved in certain criminal activity."

CNN, the sinking ship

I just watched an hourlong special on CNN, "35 Years of CNN," primarily because nothing else was on. This program amounted to 60 minutes of news personalities boasting about the network being the "only news organization" present at major historical events, such as the beginning of the Iraq war. I found all this in-house hype entertaining. CNN has, in fact, been on the air 35 years. But what has it accomplished in three-and-a-half decades? Not much, if anything.

Tax reform headed in wrong direction

As a small-business owner, I am concerned by what I've read and heard regarding Congress' efforts to overhaul our overly burdensome tax system. I support reforming the tax system to make it simpler and easier for all businesses to understand, but I worry that what Congress is proposing will be a tax-reform system geared toward large corporations, and that it will leave small businesses holding the bag and without any relief.

Then-New York Gov. George Pataki (right) is now poised to enter the GOP race for 2016, saying the party needs to veer away from social issues and concentrate more on fiscal responsibility and conservative principles. (Associated Press)

George Pataki next up to announce presidential intent, vows to 'defeat Islamic terror'

- The Washington Times

Another 24 hours, and another Republican hopeful comes to call on American voters. George Pataki will announce his plans to run for president on Thursday morning; with a touch of drama, the former New York governor will journey to Exeter, New Hampshire for his big reveal. The historic town of 9,242 was more or less the birthplace of the Republican Party, founded in 1853 right there in the local Squamscott Hotel.

Ferreting out the fakers

Fairly or not, polygraph examiners for the Central Intelligence Agency and other institutions that require security clearances for staff are not necessarily the most popular guys in the coffee shop. And for good reason: much of their professional lives are devoted to ferreting out secrets their subjects would prefer to leave untold.

Illustration on alternatives to inner-city public schools by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

An escape route from inner-city schools

Before he passed away recently, John M. Templeton, the distinguished physician and philanthropist, questioned: "Should we tolerate a public educational system with its entrenched self-interest which virtually every inner-city parent knows is destroying any hope or possibility of their children achieving meaningful opportunity in a 21st century economy?" A growing number of parents say no.

Illustration on the anti-semitism of the BDS movement by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Resisting the longest hatred

Robert S. Wistrich, who died suddenly last week, was considered the foremost scholar of anti-Semitism, which he called "the longest hatred," one that appears to be metastasizing in the current era.

FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2013 file photo, then-Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks at the State Department in Washington. On Friday, the State Department posted 296 Benghazi-related emails from Hillary Clinton's private server.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

Let's see the server

There's a media consensus that there's no "smoking gun" in the emails that Hillary Clinton, the former secretary of State and presidential candidate, has "persuaded" the department she presided over for so long to release to the public.

In this May 24, 2015 photo, police pick up a pair of shoes after a double shooting in Baltimore. Baltimore city police said dozens of people have been shot and at least eight killed in a series of separate weekend shootings. The Baltimore Sun reported that 35 people have been killed so far in May, making it the deadliest month in Baltimore since December 1999. (Colin Campbell/The Baltimore Sun via AP)

Collateral damage in the ghetto

The morgue in Baltimore is getting crowded. The riots that convulsed the city last month have subsided, and the fusillade of rocks and bricks and the burning of cars and shops has been replaced by a more frightening violence -- murder in wholesale lot.