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U.S. President Donald Trump, center, gets up to leave after making a quick statement at a meeting during the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters, Monday, Sept. 18, 2017. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Donald Trump, the right guy to rein in the United Nations

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump took the United Nations to task in recent remarks at the global body’s New York headquarters, telling those attending a special forum on “management, security and development” that the entity was in dire need of reform. It’s about time America snipped the U.N.’s wings.

Chart to accompany Rahn article of Sept. 19, 2017

What the hurricanes teach

Hurricanes Harvey and Irma were as powerful as the big South Florida hurricanes of 1926, 1928, and 1935, but the death toll was very small compared to the earlier hurricanes in the area, even though the population is now more than 10 times the size. The Great Galveston hurricane of 1900 is estimated to have cost 6,000 to 12,000 lives. The hurricanes that have hit the U.S. in the last 50 years have resulted in relatively few lives lost, with the exception of Hurricane Katrina where an estimated 1,833 died.

Duplicitous Durbin Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When Democrats try to impose a ‘religious test’

- The Washington Times

The attempted Senate mugging of Notre Dame law professor Amy Coney Barrett by Democratic Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Dick Durbin was ugly and may have amounted to an attempt to impose an unconstitutional “religious test” on a judicial nominee seeking Senate confirmation, but said more about the muggers than their intended victim.

One of 35 immigrants from 23 countries awaits the start of the naturalization ceremony that will transform them into American citizens at Northeast Jackson International Baccalaureate World Middle School in Jackson, Miss., Monday, Sept. 18, 2017. The immigrants underwent an extensive security check as well as study and testing on U.S. history, civics and government, as part of the requirements to earning citizenship documentation. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

The ignorant nation and its legacy

At a National Archives ceremony last Friday in Washington, D.C., 30 immigrants became naturalized U.S. citizens. In a video, President Trump encouraged them to embrace the “full rights, and the sacred duties, that come with American citizenship.”

Illustration on the North Korean threat by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

There’s no easy living with a nuclear-armed North Korea

We cannot learn to live with a nuclear-armed North Korea because it is a pistol aimed at our heads by the North’s dictator Kim Jong-un, China’s dictator Xi Jinping and Russia’s dictator Vladimir Putin, that sooner or later will go off.

In Praise of Asylum Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A thank you to America

On Sept. 6 at 9:57 a.m., the U.S. government accepted my application for political asylum in the United States. I want to thank the U.S. government and the great American people for taking us into their embrace and their wings at a moment when I, along with my family, am faced with the greatest adversity of my life.

The Capitol is seen at sunrise as Congress returns from the August recess to face work on immigration, the debt limit, funding the government, and help for victims of Hurricane Harvey, in Washington, Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Washington’s unethical ethics watchdog

Before “fake news” there was CREW — the ridiculously self-proclaimed Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington. This supposed government ethics watchdog has always been more of a partisan lapdog to left-leaning politicians. But now — according to a leaked document authored by Democratic hit man David Brock — CREW is set to dramatically expand its size and scope to be a key player in pursuit of impeaching President Trump and disrupting Republican priorities.

Illustration on infrastructural development in America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Building a stronger America

The infrastructure in China is impressive. My recent visit extremely impacted my perspective on the overall transportation systems in the United States as I witness that China has a big advantage with their wonderful airports, road systems and with their unique Shanghai Maglev Train. I had the opportunity to ride on the world’s fastest commercial train; it has maintained its record since 2004.

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan and other Republican leaders repeatedly cited the Byrd rule, which applies only in the Senate, as the rationale behind every retreat in their attempt to repeal Obamacare. (Associated Press/File)

Tax reform doomed if Republicans use Obamacare repeal model

There is universal agreement that the tax code is a disaster, and a general consensus among Republicans about what needs to be done. Tax reform could unleash the American economy, sparking the growth that has been lacking for a decade. Can it actually get done?

Illustration on The Washington Post's appraisal of Jeff Sessions' report on U.S. violent crime by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Post deserves these four Pinocchios

In a Sept. 1 “fact check,” The Washington Post claimed to evaluate Attorney General Sessions’ comments about rising violent crime in the United States. Specifically, this “fact check” is of Mr. Sessions’ repeated statements that “violent crime is on the rise in America, especially in our cities.”

Illustration on American commercial and private air traffic by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

America’s unfriendly skies

Liberals love to portray the Republicans as the party of the rich and powerful. The GOP has tried valiantly to shed that criticism, but then why are so many in the party defending the special interest favors that go to private and corporate jet owners over the interests of all the rest of us? Do Warren Buffett and LeBron James really need a taxpayer subsidy to jet across the country?

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The melancholy memoir of a little engine that couldn't

There are plenty of snappy titles that Hillary Clinton might have chosen for her personal account of the 2016 presidential race. "Born to Lose," "Running on Empty," "The Sun Also Sets" and "What a Way to Go" all spring to mind. "What Happened" does not. A question mark at the end might have helped. But then people could point to the name written in oversized capital letters directly under the title on the dust jacket, concluding that the answer to "What Happened?" was "Hillary Rodham Clinton."

FILE- In this Thursday, Sept. 7, 2017 file photo, President Donald Trump, center, gestures as he greets the Amir of Kuwait Sheikh Sabah Al Ahmad Al Sabah as he arrives at the White House in Washington. Kuwait says it will expel North Korea's ambassador and four other diplomats from its embassy in Kuwait City. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

The art of no deal

Someone should lend Marc Short, the White House director of legislative affairs, a copy of President Trump's book, "The Art of the Deal." The president rightly rebuked his predecessor's negotiators and promised better ones in his own administration, but Mr. Short could use some tips. His suggestion last week that funding for the Mexican border wall doesn't necessarily have to be included in a compromise with Democrats over DACA is giving away the president's store.

Religious bigotry in the Senate

Dianne Feinstein is one of the few independent Democratic voices left in the U.S. Senate. She's a former mayor of San Francisco, and knows a nut when she sees one, and as the senior Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee she has learned things there that would sober anyone but the most dedicated peacenik.

Say thank-you to local eateries

Today, why not participate in National Cheeseburger Day? Ignore all health-food-police rants about how unhealthy hamburgers are and treat yourself by going to your favorite fast-food place, diner, restaurant or steak house and order a cheeseburger.

Obama still working from the shadows

Many leftists are still calling for President Trump's tax returns. This, of course, is just another ploy, like the Russian-collusion story, to try to get something on Mr. Trump that can be magnified and distorted.