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Illustration on imprisoned felons on the voter rolls by Alexander hunter/The Washington Times

The ACLU’s army of ex-cons

Not content with filing nuisance lawsuits all over the country, most of them aimed at thwarting the Trump administration, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is plunging into local political campaigns.

Illustration on Trump's potential effect on economic growth by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Moving toward 3 percent growth

President Trump’s economic team paints a rosier picture about what his policies could accomplish than the economics profession is willing to endorse.

Illustration on Iran's threat to an independent Kurdistan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

An independent Kurdistan

In order to assist the creation of a Shia Crescent from the Persian Gulf to the Mediterranean Sea, the question remains: Is Iran working to thwart the creation of an independent Kurdistan? Are they working together with Syria in order to further this strategic goal? According to an Iraqi source, Iran is working to thwart the creation of an independent Kurdistan by trying to instigate a civil war among the Kurds by supporting groups opposed to Masoud Barzani. They are doing this because they perceive Kurdish autonomy in Northern Iraq to be a threat and they view the internal divisions among the Kurds to be the most effective way to destroy the dream of an independent Kurdistan for the Kurds presently are not united.

Product of Venezuela Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Cry for me, Venezuela

I often say only half-jokingly to students on college campuses who are all in with Bernie Sanders that if they think socialism is such a wonderful economic model: how about a one-way ticket to Caracas?

Higher Temperature Readings Equal More Money Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Degrading Earth’s future climate

Best practice in science is achieved through a minimum of two critical conditions: humility and perspective. If humility and perspective are ignored, science suffers.

President Donald Trump smiles as he listens to Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos, speak during a news conference in the East Room of the White House, Thursday, May 18, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Destroying Donald Trump is all that matters in the newsrooms of the mainstream media

- The Washington Times

Now anything goes. All restraints are loosened, all self-discipline trashed. There’s no cure or even treatment for Trump Derangement Syndrome, a disease as wild and as swiftly lethal as anything imported from the Ebola River valley of the dark continent. The rules and taboos that once guided even the sleaziest excuse for a newspaper no longer apply.

Illustration on the crisis in Venezuela by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Venezuela’s self-made crisis

Time is running out for Venezuela, a nation of 31 million with perhaps the world’s largest proved reserves of crude oil. The consequences of its descent for its neighbors and for the United States, whether into dictatorship, civil war, or bloody chaos, demand an immediate response — well beyond the call for dialogue, partial targeted sanctions, and resolutions.

The Swamp is Winning Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why swamp fever must be cured

The accusations in the media against President Donald Trump are reaching hysterical levels. This has also been labeled “Trump Derangement Syndrome,” and is characterized by a reporter’s firm belief (shared by many Democratic politicians and Hillary Clinton supporters) that Mr. Trump is illegitimately occupying the Oval Office, is not fit for presidential duty, and must be ousted one way or another.

Coordinated Preemptive Korea Attack Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Forging a strategy for North Korea

If one consults the great strategists of the human experience such as Karl Von Clausewitz, Sun Tzu, or B.H. Liddell Hart the goal of strategy never changes: it is the application of power in order to attain a clear objective, which in the case for grand strategy could be multi-generational.

Illustration on Trump administration difficulties by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

The Comey memo

When the news broke this week that President Trump had passed highly classified information to the Russian foreign minister at a White House meeting, administration officials said the story was “false.”

U.N. Secretary General Antonio Guterres, center, addresses the European Parliament, while EU Parliament president Antonio Tajani leaves in Strasbourg, eastern France, Wednesday, May 17, 2017. (AP Photo/Jean-Francois Badias)

EU deepens its own crisis with attacks on Hungary, Poland

The European Parliament has condemned Hungary for human rights issues and a breakdown of the rule of law. Brussels is now threatening all-out financial war against both Hungary and Poland, among others, for alleged human rights abuses and anti-democratic policies and actions. But with conservative governments insisting on their sovereign right to protect their borders and preserve their national identities, Europe is headed for an existential crisis from which it may not recover in its current form.

Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto, top left, pauses while speaking to the press, at the end of a press conference where he announced measures intended to protect journalists, in Mexico City, Wednesday, May 17, 2017. Pena said he is taking actions to halt slayings of journalists, without giving specifics, and promised more resources to help those under threat. Past measures have been ineffective in stopping the bloodshed among the country's media workers. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

When the press plays ‘gotcha,’ nobody wins

It’s a difficult time to be proud of everything about America. The president is vilified from all sides (some criticism deserved, some not), and what’s difficult to defend is the democratic process as we’ve used it to produce both the likes of Donald Trump and the press that rushes like lemmings to judgment.

Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon talks, during First Minister's Questions at the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh, Thursday May 11, 2017. Britain will hold a general election on June 8. (Jane Barlow/PA via AP)

The big hack attack and the NHS

The ransomware cyberattack that wormed its way into at least 74 countries recently exposed new vulnerabilities in the United Kingdom’s National Health Service (NHS), as if it weren’t vulnerable enough.

Illustration on the challenge of Middle East peace negotiations by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Five steps toward achieving Middle East peace

Donald Trump’s decision to visit Saudi Arabia during his first overseas trip as president creates the perfect opportunity for his administration to take positive steps toward addressing five key needs in the region.

Related Articles

How Austen novels are 'revolutionary at their heart'

The default setting for a novel is the present day. We also have historical novels, sci-fic novels, gothic novels, and novels about other worlds -- including chicklit and Scandi Noir. We call them "genre novels" to distinguish them from mainstream fiction about believable characters and events in credible places.

Tyranny's tyranny, no matter flavor

After ratification of the Constitution, Benjamin Franklin was said to have walked out of Independence Hall and been asked by a passer-by, "What have you created?" Franklin replied, "A democracy, if you can keep it." Franklin contemporary Thomas Jefferson is credited with having said, "I hold it that a little rebellion now and then is a good thing " Franklin, Jefferson and many of the Founders were powerful thinkers on social, religious, scientific, moral and secular matters. Yet they knew they needed each other if they had any hope of their new nation surviving.

State Rep. Jody Richards, D-Bowling Green, reads a story to Head Start children at Community Action of Southern Kentucky, Thursday, May 18, 2017, in Bowling Green, Ky. (Bac Totrong/Daily News via AP)

Good First Amendment news

Sometimes there's a nugget of something good in the daily ration of bad news. A T-shirt printer in Lexington, Ky., one Blaine Adamson, won a state court ruling early this month that he was within his First Amendment rights to refuse to print an offensive message on T-shirts ordered by the Gay and Lesbian Services Organization for a "gay pride" parade.

President Donald Trump listens to Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos, left, speak during a news conference in the East Room of the White House, Thursday, May 18, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

A promise not kept

During the late, lamented campaign of 2016, when brave talk was in season, Donald Trump promised faithfully that once he was president he would take the United States out of the infamous Paris climate accord, an international agreement signed and promoted by Barack Obama that locks the United States into all kinds of anti-competitive things "to combat global climate change."

Selling out Israel will backfire

When an unidentified high-ranking State Department official said that the Western Wall was not part of Israel — despite the wall's having been indisputably in Israel proper for the past 50 years — there were immediate protests from not only Jews, but evangelical Christians as well. Now, to the dismay of those concerned about the security of Israel and its biblical and historical background, President Trump's national security adviser, H.R. McMaster, is refusing to contradict this official's ludicrous statement ("Top Trump aide won't say if Western Wall is part of Israel," Web, May 16).

In this May 16, 2017, photo, President Donald Trump welcomes Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan to the White House in Washington. The Trump administration faced growing calls Thursday for a forceful response to violence by Turkish presidential guards on American soil, who were briefly detained this week but then set free. The unseemly incident added to U.S.-Turkish tensions that are being compounded by a growing spat over U.S. war strategy against the Islamic State group in Syria. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

No use trying to satisfy demanding Democrats

A close relative shared with me his thoughts on the odd situation we find ourselves in these days, where Republicans are in charge of the Congress and the White House yet it feels as if the minority Democrats are running the show.

In this Sept. 13, 2016, file photo, House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Molly Riley, File)

Jason Chaffetz's right: Where's the memo, Mr. Comey?

- The Washington Times

House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Jason Chaffetz, in a Thursday "Good Morning America" interview, wondered aloud where the now-famous James Comey memos were -- and whether the fired FBI director really was going to release them for public viewing. These are good questions. The American public has a right to see the so-called evidence being used to take down President Donald Trump.

In this May 3, 2017, file photo, FBI Director James Comey listens on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Comey: Higher-ups never asked for halt to FBI investigations

- The Washington Times

James Comey, just-fired FBI director, said in a Senate hearing earlier this month that he's never been asked by higher-ups to back off an investigation for political reasons, an interesting remark given the fact President Donald Trump's now being accused of that very thing.

In this May 4, 2017, file photo, the U.S. flag flies in front of the Capitol dome on Capitol Hill in Washington. A North Korean parliamentary committee sent a rare letter of protest to the U.S. House of Representatives on Friday, May 12, 2017, over its new package of tougher sanctions. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

A dumb amendment for a dumber age

May 20 marks 25 years since the 27th Amendment to the Constitution was declared ratified -- more than 200 years after it was first proposed to the states.

Contraception in Catholic Colleges Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Catholic collegiate contraception complicity

President Trump's latest executive order titled "Promoting Free Speech and Religious Liberty," potentially ends the enforcement of the Obama administration's Health and Human Services (HHS) contraception mandate requiring all employers -- including religious institutions -- to provide health insurance that covers contraception.