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Illustration on unconventional war by Linas Garsys/The Washington Tmes

Winning an unconventional war

War is — and always will be — hell. The Law of Armed Conflict is not meant to change that — only to make it a little less hellish. There are weapons you agree not to use. In exchange, your enemy doesn’t use those weapons against you. You treat captured combatants humanely. You expect the same when your soldiers are taken prisoner.

Draining Military Morale Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The military’s malaise

There’s a cloud of malaise worthy of Jimmy Carter that has settled over the nation’s military. The man who should be able to clear away the cloud, Defense Secretary Ashton Carter, won’t be able to do anything about it.

This image provided buy the Library of Congress shows an artists rendering of the surrender of Confederate General Robert E. Lee to Union General Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865. (Associated Press)

Historical loops of presidents and wars

This Presidents Day, when we commemorate the past and present leaders of this country, it’s also a time for Americans to reconsider the patterns of American power through our history and consider where they want the pattern to continue as we get ready to elect a new leader into office.

Illustration on the mediocre U.S. economic recovery by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

An economy mired in mediocrity

For seven years, President Obama’s economic recovery has been all “faux” and no “go.” The one thing America elected him to do in 2008 — restore the economy — still remains effectively undone as growth continues to be lackluster. It has become clear that when it comes to America’s economy, he takes a uniquely fatalistic approach to its performance.

Illustration on the relationship between Hillary Clinton and Goldman Sachs by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Pinned to Wall Street

When Goldman Sachs, the powerful, multibillion-dollar Wall Street investment bank, offered Hillary Clinton $675,000 for three speeches, she readily accepted.

Spiro Agnew Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How Spiro Agnew shaped Republican rhetoric

Spiro Agnew today is what he characterized himself as in 1968. Richard Nixon tapped the unknown governor of Maryland to be his Republican vice presidential running mate: “not exactly a household word.”

Duplicitous attacks on the Maldives

It is a compelling tale. A longtime political activist leads his party to victory in a closely fought election in a country famed for its pristine archipelagos and on the front of the war against climate change. There is no doubt that Mohamed Nasheed, the former president of the Maldives, was adept at using the international media to promote his agenda while in government.

A student teacher in the second-grade classroom of teacher Susanne Diaz at Marcus Whitman Elementary School, goes over lessons with students, in Richland, Wash. (Ty Beaver/The Tri-City Herald via AP)

Let no child be left unconfused

- The Washington Times

Mae West, the famous philosopher of the boudoir, would hardly believe her fortune today. “So many men,” she once complained, “so little time.” She was the kind of girl who set out to “climb the ladder of success, wrong by wrong.”

Illustrations on Christians and Yazidis in Syria and Iraq by Lians Garsys/The Washington Times

Forsaken for their faith

It’s now a couple of weeks of news cycles since we learned from satellite imagery that the Islamic State had destroyed the monastery of St. Elijah, which for more than 11 centuries served as a spiritual oasis for the promulgation of Christianity in the Middle East.

Cost of Ethanol on the Economy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Renewable Fuel Standard deceit

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) wants Americans to pay more for their groceries. That’s the only way to explain the agency’s decision to mandate the use of corn-based ethanol in our gas supply.

Changing Campaign Financing Rules Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

An alternative to nonstop political fundraising

America’s campaign finance laws are often a convenient scapegoat for all of our country’s ills. Witness Democratic socialist Sen. Bernie Sanders invoking campaign spending in response to seemingly every other debate question.

Illustration on bad teachers by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Teachers who can’t teach

Anew study in the New England Journal of Medicine has a surprising conclusion. It finds that over the past decade, 1 percent of physicians accounted for 32 percent of malpractice claims. In other words, health care providers could eliminate one-third of malpractice and its associated health, legal and economic costs by removing the worst 1 percent of doctors.

GOP Talent Pool Fading Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The disappearing governors

The Iowa caucuses may have only muddied the waters in the presidential race, but they almost definitively decided one thing: the next president will not be a governor. That’s an amazing revelation because just one year ago all the smart money was betting that the next president would be a Republican governor.

Illustration on U.S. development of reusable rockets by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A dangerous partnership with Russia

It is with a terrible sense of deja vu that I find myself again warning American lawmakers about our reliance on Russian rocket engines to loft military satellites. For more than a decade, America’s workhorse rocket, the United Launch Alliance’s (ULA) Atlas V, has been powered with RD-180 engines imported from Russia.

Comparing Abortion to the Holocaust Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How abortion dehumanizes everyone

Over 50 years ago, Adolf Eichmann, the architect of Nazi Germany’s machinery of death, was executed by hanging after his 1961 conviction by an Israeli court.

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This 'catch-and-release' not Bush's

The lead paragraph in "Obama reinstates 'catch-and-release' policy for illegal immigrants" (Web, Feb. 4) appears to include a lie when paired with information in the next paragraph. The clear implication is that "catch-and-release" was a George W. Bush policy. In fact Bush inherited and subsequently ended the policy.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Frost: That was the Life That Was'

This is an informative and entertaining book about a talented and complicated man, and if it is not quite a model biography, it is certainly a model authorized biography.

Knowledge gains up to students

Thank you, Michael Poliakoff, for pointing out the lack of capability of many college graduates ("College ignorance and the threat to liberty," Web, Feb. 3). While agreeing with the points Mr. Poliakoff makes, it should be noted that the problems he describes pervade the whole educational system and apply equally to middle and high schools.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks in Derry, N.H. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)

Hillary's tin-ear disease

Willie Sutton, the famous bank robber of a bygone age, and Hillary Clinton are two of a kind. Someone, probably a psychology major working on a term paper, once asked Willie why he robbed banks. He answered simply, "because that's where the money is."

Protestors against asylum seekers being deported, gather for a rally in Sydney, Australia, Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016. Australia was resisting mounting international pressure not to deport child asylum seekers, with a minister warning on Thursday that allowing them to stay could attract more refugees to come by boat. (AP Photo/Rob Griffith)

Australia's migrant tide

The immigrant surge throughout the world is not just south to north. Migrants are surging to Australia, too, and Australia's highest court has ordered a temporary respite from a migrant threat like that in Europe and North America.

Logo courtesy of NFL and CBS Sports.

Beer, cheer and a big TV: Americans drop $15.5 billion on their Super Bowl splurge

- The Washington Times

It is a big, bustling, hungry audience: media analysts anticipate that 189 million U.S. fans are expected to watch the fiftieth Super Bowl on Sunday, with another 100 million tuning in worldwide. Big game culture is in force: the National Retail Federation says Americans will spend $15.5 billion on team apparel, decorations and of course the traditional menu of pizza, nachos, beer, hoagies, chili and other goodies - like chicken wings. Americans will scarf down 1.3 million of them according to the National Chicken Council, a meticulous industry group which says this figure is up by 3 percent since last year. Not to be outdone, Dominos expects to sell 12 million pizzas.

Trump, Cruz not right for U.S.

I have always believed the people of Iowa to generally be good-natured, decent individuals who make up the heartland of America. That image has sustained a hard hit with the stunning and sad selection of Republican candidates Sen. Ted Cruz and Donald Trump as front-runners in the Iowa presidential caucuses.

Article V convention for change

Republican presidential hopeful Sen. Marco Rubio is correct: The federal government is out of control ("Marco Rubio amplifies call for constitutional convention, courts conservative voters"). Our national debt will soon be $20 trillion, and that does not even include the close-to-$100-trillion in unfunded liabilities.

President Barack Obama closes his eyes while a prayer is made at the National Prayer Breakfast in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016. The annual event brings together U.S. and international leaders from different parties and religions for an hour devoted to faith. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The profits of doom

"Doomsayer" is probably not on Al Gore's resume but it's as descriptive as "almost president." It perfectly describes the attention he has attracted in the decade since he took to the stage at the Sundance Film Festival and set off global warming fears with his agitprop film, "An Inconvenient Truth."

ASSOCIATED PRESS
Herds of Asian elephants in Malaysia's Taman Negara National Park in Pahang state are apparently larger than feared, according to an examination of the dung they leave behind.

A dilemma for Jumbo

Liberty and freedom are man's natural desires, but like everything else liberation is complicated, as man and elephant are learning in Myanmar, or Burma as it was called for centuries. Myanmar is making its way back into the real world after sitting it out in isolation for almost a hundred years.

Arrogant Iranian Actions Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Iranian arrogance

Iran's recent capture of two U.S. Navy 47-foot Riverine Command Boats (RCBs) that were on a routine transit from Kuwait to Bahrain on January 12 is another example of the arrogance and contempt Iran holds for America and our political leadership.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Widow'

"The Widow" arrives from England recommended as "twisty psychological suspense" and "an electrifying debut thriller." It's not either of these. It's more like a jigsaw puzzle. From the get-go you know how the final picture looks: in this case, you soon realize that Glen Taylor is the villain who abducted two-year old Bella Elliott.