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Illustration on the gradual revelation of the Obama administration's true nature by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Taking back America

Never in my lifetime did I believe this great nation would be taken down and withdrawn from its world leadership position by its own leadership.

Illustration by Clement, National Post, Toronto, Canada

Troubled times for Angela Merkel

Angela Merkel tops the Forbes magazine list of the hundred most powerful women in the world for the fourth consecutive year, but these are difficult days for the German chancellor.

Illustration on the prescient warnings of Reagan's "A Time to Choose" speech by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A Reagan refresher course on freedom

- The Washington Times

On Oct. 27, 1964 — 50 years ago next Monday — a tall, handsome man strode to a podium draped with red, white and blue bunting. Perhaps only he — and the most savvy political observers — knew it at the time, but the speaker was about to launch a transformational political movement.

FILE - In this Jan. 30, 2010, file photo, Vice President Joe Biden, left, with his son Hunter, right, at the Duke Georgetown NCAA college basketball game in Washington. Hunter Biden is expressing regret for being discharged from the Navy Reserve amid published reports that he tested positive for cocaine. The Wall Street Journal reports that Hunter Biden failed the drug test last year and was discharged in February. In a statement issued Thursday, Oct. 16, Biden doesn't say why he was discharged. He says he's embarrassed that his actions led to his discharge and that he respects the Navy's decision. The vice president's office declined to comment.(AP Photo/Nick Wass, File)

The Hunter Biden chronicles

Everything you need to know about Beltway nepotism, corporate cronyism and corruption can be found in the biography of Robert Hunter Biden.

Illustration on excessive government regulation of oil by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

Opening the tap for crude-oil exports

Not many years ago, the idea of “peak oil” was all the rage. The concept, first identified in 1956 by M. King Hubbert, a geologist working for Shell Oil, held that there was a finite amount of oil in the ground and that oil production would peak in the 1970s and then decline.

Underfunding of Charter Schools in D.C. Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

D.C. charter schools deserve equal funding

As Washington gets ready to select a new mayor, D.C. voters should insist that to get their vote, a candidate should pledge to provide all students in the District equitable treatment when it comes to school funding.

Illustration on Ron Klain by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Treating Ebola with politics

When the then-spreading Ebola virus threatened our nation last week, President Obama put one man in charge of coordinating the government’s response who had zero experience in handling infectious diseases.

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In this Sept. 30, 2014, file photo, Gordon Kamara, left, is sprayed by Konah Deno after they loaded six patients suspected to have been infected by the Ebola virus into their ambulance in the village of Freeman Reserve, about 30 miles north of Monrovia, Liberia. *AP Photo/Jerome Delay, File)

It's the Ebola incompetence, stupid

There are a few things in the world that we know for sure, including the existence of Ebola, what those infected go through, and the fact that, as of now, there is no cure or official universal treatment that mitigate its fatality rate said to be around 70 percent.

Rising Sea Levels Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Another EPA alarm about rising seas that aren't rising

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy visited Miami Beach recently to raise awareness about the need to "stop global warming" in order to save the region from dangerous sea-level rise.

In this Oct. 1, 2014 photo, placards advocating a position to keep casino gambling in Massachusetts rest against a wall in the entrance to the Plainridge Racecourse harness racing track in Plainville, Mass. The Plainridge Park Casino is under construction adjacent to the harness racing track in Plainville. Voters will decide in the Nov. 4 election whether to repeal a 2011 law that opened the door for casinos in the state. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

Pew Research poll finds motivated conservatives twice as likely as liberals to vote on Nov. 4

- The Washington Times

Conservatives are twice as likely as their liberal counterparts to go to the polls Nov. 4. No really. "Although overall turnout among the public is likely to be around 40 percent, 73 percent of those who hold consistently conservative attitudes are likely to vote in the midterm, as are 52 percent of those with mostly conservative views," reports the Americans Trends Panel, a substantial new gauge of the upcoming midterm election by the indefatigable Pew Research Center.

Shortly before mailing his own ballot, U.S. Senator Mark Udall, D-Colo., speaks inside a coffee shop on a campaign stop to remind voters to mail in their ballots, in the Five Points area of Denver, Monday, Oct. 20, 2014. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Showing proper ID is a fact of life

If you've ever tried to board a plane, cash a check or rent a car, you've almost surely had to show some form of identification with your picture on it. Millions of Americans produce them every day to do dozens of everyday tasks and think nothing of it.

Illustration of Charles Hagel by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

BABBIN: The Pentagon's war on the global climate

The Pentagon's "2014 Climate Change Adaptation Roadmap," published last week, demonstrates how thoroughly and deeply liberal "climate change" ideology is being embedded in our military establishment.

Illustration on U. S. Ebola preparedness by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

BURR: Making Ebola preparedness a priority

It is unsettling that in discussing shortfalls in the federal government's response to the Ebola crisis, some Beltway observers have resorted to the traditional Washington shell game: blame the budget.

Blowing billions

Spending $17.9 trillion is hard work. Dispensing cash at a rate of $1 million per hour would require 2,040 years to rack up a sum as large as the national debt. It's not that big-spending bureaucrats are lazy, but that their hard work has created their own special expertise at wasting money.

FILE- In this Sept. 10, 2014, file photo, North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory speaks to members of the media in Raleigh, N.C. In a letter dated Oct. 6 to French officials, McCrory said the plain packaging proposal may detract from more effective ways of curbing cigarette use. The French bill requiring neutral cigarette packs by 2016 is slated for debate in French Parliament next year. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)

Races for the statehouse

With little mystery about the prospects of continued Republican control of the House of Representatives, attention is focused on the Senate, where there is a lot of uncertainty. This focus gives short shrift to the important races for the statehouses, where Democrats are looking for bright spots but where the Republicans may produce several surprises.

This undated handout photo provided by Revolution shows Ron Klain, a former chief of staff to Vice President Joe Biden.   A longtime Democratic operative, Klain was tasked Friday by President Barack Obama with running the government's response to the Ebola crisis. (AP Photo/Revolution)

Ebola crisis needs more than a bureaucrat czar

President Obama's confused and timid response to the Ebola crisis has done nothing to calm the fear that stalks America, and choosing a well-connected Democratic lawyer, lobbyist and what the White House calls "an implementation expert" isn't likely to make anyone feel better. Ronald A. Klain has no medical, scientific, public health or administrative experience to become the nation's Ebola czar.