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The Hillary Effect on Women Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton’s problem with women

Two weeks before the election, Hillary Clinton appears on track to win the presidency and become the first female commander in chief. She can credit her surge in the polls this last month to women — primarily her opponent’s offensive comments unearthed from a decade ago and the various accusations that have suddenly surfaced and have dominated the media.

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton greets supporters following a "Get out the vote," rally at Curtis Hixon Waterfront Park, Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016 in downtown Tampa, Fla. (Loren Elliot/Tampa Bay Times via AP)

Hillary’s anti-transparency bargain

President Obama recently condemned the Republican Party, claiming that its “central principle” is to suppress voting. But, while his administration piously pledges to protect voting rights, it has almost guaranteed that Americans will be blindfolded on Election Day. While the Justice Department will deploy election monitors at polls in 25 states, no one watched Uncle Sam.

Illustration on NATO fiscal responsibility by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A threadbare alliance

Historians and political scientists commonly describe the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) as the most effective military alliance in contemporary history. It was the bond between the United States and Western Europe that helped contribute to the decline and eventual collapse of the Soviet Union.

Illustration on the 2016 campaign by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why Donald Trump is still the safer choice

America is a two-party system and after party conventions select the nominees, we have two choices and only two choices. Both nominees have demonstrated serious character flaws. The current spotlight is on lewd, vulgar comments from Donald Trump that cannot be defended. Nevertheless, his words could never be used to justify a vote for Hillary Clinton and her leftist agenda.

Donald Trump arrives at a Trump rally at Sanford Orlando International Airport in Sanford, Fla., Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016. Trump is pledging to bolster the government's investment in the space program, a boon to the Space Coast of Florida. (Stephen M. Dowell/Orlando Sentinel via AP)

The staying power of populism

Despite evidence from the 2016 presidential campaign, doubts dominate about populism’s ability to win America’s ultimate prize. “It can’t happen here” is as wrong as the political establishment’s misreading of the populist movement itself. Populism’s history here and abroad argues a populist triumph could eventually occur — if not this November, then soon.

Missile Attack Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Iran’s proxy missile attacks

The recent missile attacks attributed to Yemeni Houthi rebels, with assistance from the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) and Hezbollah, demonstrate Iran’s classic use of proxies to promote its political agenda. The Houthi rebels denied any involvement in the missile attacks.

Illustration on non-voters by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

In defense of the nonvoter

Between now and Nov. 8, Americans will be inundated with good-intentioned public service announcements urging them to take the time to vote. And to buttress that argument, statistics about the usual low turnout rate — about 60 percent or so — will suggest that this American trend is somehow illustrative of a major defect in the body politic.

John Podsesta (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The coming media settlement with Hillary

- The Washington Times

There’s no one more repentant and eager to promise reform than the town drunk coming off a week at the bottom of a bottle. Some of “the top political reporters in the country,” as they think of themselves, will be soon looking for similar redemption.

The Tail Wagging the Middle East Dog Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Mistaking the cause of Middle East turmoil

President Obama might sandbag Israel in pursuit of something Palestinian leadership rejects — peace with the Jewish state. The blow reportedly may fall in the interregnum between the Nov. 8 election and the Jan. 20 inauguration of the next president.

Illustration on human trafficking and open borders by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The other open-borders commodity

Some proponents of the current open borders policy also claim to be defenders of women’s rights. It is, therefore, supremely ironic that one unintended consequence of open borders is a substantial spike in sex trafficking of young girls. That’s the major takeaway of a trip to South Texas earlier this month.

Illustration on Hillary's support of partial birth abortion by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Reconsider ‘Never Trump’

While Democrats perpetually circle the wagons, Republicans engage a perpetual circular firing squad. The same holds true for many evangelicals. Democrats and secularists count on it.

Britney Corbett oversees a ninth-grade math at Washington Leadership Academy in Northeast D.C. The technology-focused high school charter, which opened its doors in August, teaches students the basics and how to write computer code and use drones. (Julia Porterfield/The Washington Times)

Black students matter

Money talks and the NAACP walks away from its mission to ensure educational equality for black kids.

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Illustration on voter regret by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When voters have regret

Four years from now, will you regret having voted for the person you chose this year for president? In decision theory, there is a concept called "regret," which is the emotion experienced when realizing that an alternative course of action would have likely resulted in a more favorable outcome.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Rogue Heroes'

They were the pirates of the desert, the mavericks of war who took terrifying risks to infiltrate behind enemy lines -- and World War II might not have been won without them.

Former President Bill Clinton, left, accompanied by Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at debate watch party at the Craig Ranch Regional Amphitheater in North Las Vegas, Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016, following the third presidential debate. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

The Clintons' top 10 pay-to-play scandals

- The Washington Times

The Clintons' have been involved in an elaborate pay-to-play scheme, auctioning off their personal time and government access, to the highest bidder. The Clinton Foundation was the vehicle used by foreign governments and dignitaries, in which they would donate money to in exchange for time with the potential next president, the former president, or beneficial treatment from the U.S. government while Hillary Clinton was serving as Secretary of State.

Bill Clinton the real danger to women

The recent disclosure of Donald Trump's past 'locker-room' blather remains disheartening. But what are more than taxing to digest and countenance are the self-righteous pontifications from the likes of assorted major media columnists and other hypocritical miscreants of the far left regarding this regrettable Trump behavior.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump arrives to speak at a campaign rally at Regent University, Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016, in Virginia Beach, Va. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

A little tease by the Donald

Donald Trump may be having a little fun, even if his friends and foes, who are worrying about what happens on Nov. 8, are not. They're not sure why he said he wouldn't accept defeat, nor what, exactly, he meant. He hardly clarified his meaning to them the next day when he said he would accept the voters' verdict "if I win."

Hillary unsafe at any 'speed'

While all of Queen Clinton's media and all of the establishment cockroaches are scurrying out from under their rocks and clamoring for Donald Trump to withdraw from the race, it is perhaps worthwhile to recall Hillary Clinton's own hypocritical track record on issues of character ("When character is in season," Web, Oct. 19).

Obama-sanctioned misogyny OK

President and Mrs. Obama have invited numerous rappers to the White House over their years in residence, rappers whose lyrics are not only as misogynistic as the Donald's spoken words back in 2005, but much more violent ("And they call it puppy love," Web, Oct. 18).

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton greets supporters during a campaign event at University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Sunday, Oct. 23, 2016, in Charlotte, N.C. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

The peril in the polls

Public-opinion polls can be infuriating. They're often read as if they're telling us how to vote, rather than a speculation on how what we'll do. Indeed, some voters who want to be part of a fashionable majority will take them that way, and hitch a ride on a bandwagon.

Illustration on Hillary's contradictory positions by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary, the hypocrite

In the modern history of American politics has there ever been a bigger hypocrite than Hillary Clinton? Her 30 years in politics has taught us clearly that Hillary lives by one set of rules and wants to impose different rules for everyone else.

Unequal Access for Land Owners Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

No equal justice for landowners

Lawyers are expensive, especially when citizens fight the federal government. That is why, in 1980, Congress passed the Equal Access to Justice Act (EAJA), which authorizes those who prevail in litigation against the federal government to collect attorney's fees and expenses, that is, unless federal lawyers were "substantially justified," in bringing and litigating the case. Sadly, a Wyoming federal district court recently turned the EAJA on its head.

In this photo taken Oct. 5, 2016 file photo, Hillary Clinton's campaign manager John Podesta speaks to members of the media outside Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's home in Washington. Hacked emails reveal internal disagreement among top Clinton aides about her determination to hold a Clinton Foundation summit in Morocco that later drew attention over its reliance on large donations from foreign governments.  (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

When major media looked the other way

Two Democratic Party campaign operatives lost their jobs last Tuesday after being caught red-handed on video describing how to incite violence at Donald Trump rallies and how to commit massive voter fraud.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Fates and Traitors: A Novel of John Wilkes Booth'

"Fates and Traitors," Jennifer Chiaverini's new historical novel, starts on a high note: "A sound in the darkness outside the barn -- a furtive whisper, the careless snap of a dry twig underfoot -- woke him from a fitful doze ... There ... quick footfalls, and, more distantly, the jingle of spurs."

Justifying Ones Views on Abortion Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary's faith

"Secretary Clinton, I want to explore how far you believe the right to abortion goes," asked Fox News Channel's Chris Wallace, moderator for the third and final presidential debate. "You have been quoted as saying that the fetus has no constitutional rights. You also voted against a ban on late-term, partial-birth abortions. Why?"

Integrity, honesty absent at FBI

The FBI and Department of Justice are prosecuting retired four-star Gen. James Cartwright for mishandling classified information, in the apparent belief that this shows the American public the FBI is willing to prosecute even big-shots.