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Warren G. Harding (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Donald Trump, the unstoppable force of nature — maybe

- The Washington Times

The dogs bark, the flies scatter, the gasbags at the conventions send enormous clouds of toxic waste to hover over Cleveland and Philadelphia that won’t dissipate until Labor Day, and the caravan moves on. Election Day approaches, and rarely have so many been so disappointed with the choice before us.

Fathers Absent from "Black Lives Matter" Movement Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Black Lives Matter’s real agenda

Unless you have been “off the grid” for a while, you have heard a lot in the news about Black Lives Matter. This “movement” has gotten a lot of press and some notable praise from celebrities and politicians, including positive mentions from President Obama. But I suspect that most people, including many who have tweeted #blacklivesmatter, have not visited its website.

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's position in support of the Democratic base by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton’s mixed messages

- The Washington Times

Black Lives Matter, Black Panthers, Occupy Wall Street, Socialists, Communists, those who want to strip God from their party platform, LGBTQ activists, Planned Parenthood, Hispanics, white-working class union workers, Wall Street, and climate-change mongers, all have a place in the Democratic Party.

Illustration on the relationship between Pakistani government corruption and the rise of Islamist violence by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How religious extremists thrive

As Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton spar over security and foreign aid, those of us living in Pakistan wonder how we ended up in the rearview mirror of the debate. American taxpayers spend billions of dollars per year in Pakistan — a nuclear state with religious extremists baying at the door — and next door in Afghanistan, where the Taliban are ensconced.

Church and State Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Defending religious liberty

I write with a deep and growing concern about the future of religious liberty in the United States.

Mike Pence, Conservative Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why Pence makes sense

Whenever I talk to conservatives across the country about the presidential election, a common refrain is that they find Donald Trump refreshing in many ways. They like that he eschews political correctness and promises to stand up for ordinary Americans against the elites.

SM-3 Missile Defense Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Defending against the growing missile threat

Both Iran and North Korea are rogue nations developing and testing new missile technologies at an alarming rate. Iran threatens U.S. forces and has missile technology to carry out those threats. North Korea has successfully tested missiles that can be fired from submarines and is threatening to use them.

Illustration on expanding health care choices for veterans by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Remodeling veterans’ health care for the 21st century

From 2007 to 2009, I served as undersecretary for health in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Overseeing the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), I often saw the best of what our nation offers veterans recovering from the wounds of war in a system staffed by committed health professionals devoted to providing quality care.

Fethullah Gulen     The Washington Times

A Gulen factor in Turkey’s turmoil?

As the dust settles in Turkey following the bloodiest coup in recent history, questions continue to surface about who was behind the recent uprising. In the midst of the unfolding drama, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan accused rival Fethullah Gulen of being behind the putsch.

Clinton Scandals Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A vivid symbol of scandal

Democrats gathered for their convention in Philadelphia know Hillary Clinton did not escape her latest bout with scandal unscathed. While Hillary once more remained one step ahead of the law, she is several steps behind the public. She could not have picked a worse time for her latest foray into the ethical morass.

North Korea Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho talks to a reporter after a break during the 23rd Asean Regional meeting in Vientiane, Laos, Tuesday, July 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)

Disappointment with China

China’s reaction to the decision of the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague that there was no evidence that China had exercised exclusive control over the waters or resources historically in the South China Sea was disappointing but expected.

Illustration on the Democratic National Convention by Tim Brinton

Chaos at the Democratic National Convention

Cleveland versus Philadelphia. So many predicted a cataclysmic disaster for the Republicans during their convention. Yet, it ended up being an organized, well-run event showcasing the reformation of the Republican Party and propelling Donald Trump to the biggest post-convention bounce for either party since 2000.

Related Articles

Illustration on the bus tax by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A regulatory plague from Austin

All plagues, whether they are biological or destructive policy ideas, begin at some specific place and time. The city of Austin, Texas, is now the place of origin of what could be a very costly experiment.

Illustration on all terrain powered wheelchairs for veterans by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Wheelchairs for veterans

Many Americans are familiar with the military creed of never leaving a fallen comrade behind, a commitment that has served as the real-life inspiration for Hollywood movies chronicling daring rescue operations under impossible odds of injured or captured service members.

Trump on TV Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trump's acceptance speech

Donald Trump's acceptance speech at the Republican National Convention was too long -- 75 minutes -- and too loud. Modulation is the key to good public speaking. One's voice should rise and fall like the tide, which allows really important points to be made whether the volume is low or high. His adult children are better speakers.

In-Activist Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How to defeat activists

This month, Congress passed a bill requiring all genetically improved foods to be labeled. But it's essentially meaningless. Genetically improved foods are just as safe as the veggies in a backyard garden, and virtually all foods -- organic or not -- have been genetically improved at some point in their history.

The office of New York Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman told Reuters that it routinely seeks input from outside organizations but pursues cases based only on the merits. (Associated Press)

Challenging the climate change bullies

A few months ago, news broke of an astounding assault on free speech. No, the media didn't present it that way, but that's how some conservatives, myself included, characterized it. And with good reason.

U.S. indeed less safe now

When you look at the statistics of the past 10 years, crime has been trending downward. Even with the increase in crime in the largely Democratic inner cities such as Chicago, Baltimore and Washington, the overall national trend of major crimes in America has been down until this year.

An anti-Hillary Clinton demonstrator stands with a sign in downtown Philadelphia, Monday, July 25, 2016, on the first day of the Democratic National Convention. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Brotherly love in Philadelphia

The Democrats, like a pig stuck in a barbed wire fence, have a lot to cry about. Their nominee got the telephone call from the governor (or in this case the FBI) with the hoped-for stay of execution, their national convention just barely escaped implosion, but the landslide victory they expected only a month ago doesn't look like that any longer.

Illustration on leveraging U.S. visas against China's territorial aggression in the South China Sea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Reversing China's South China Sea grab

The South China Sea (SCS) is currently the focus of a dispute between the People's Republic of China (PRC), Taiwan, the Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia and Brunei. The PRC has preemptively deployed military personnel and equipment to enforce their claims to a trumped-up, self-identified but unrecognized "nine-dash line," an imagined boundary that is inconsistent with international law and commonly accepted international behavior.

Chinese President Xi Jinping speaks during a meeting with World Health Organization Director-General Margaret Chan, not shown, at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, Monday, July 25, 2016. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, Pool)

The clouds on the horizon

When China spits, Asia swims. Everybody east of Suez learns that ancient tribute to the size and ambitions of the Middle Kingdom. Now Asia hears the harsh hocking noise that sounds suspiciously like China clearing its throat.