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Demonstrators sharing opposing views argue during a rally Thursday, April 27, 2017, in Berkeley, Calif. Demonstrators gathered near the University of California, Berkeley campus amid a strong police presence and rallied to show support for free speech and condemn the views of Ann Coulter and her supporters. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

Spooked by the power of words, words, words

- The Washington Times

The only thing anyone is allowed to hear on campus is a slogan. Thinking is so 20th century (and early 20th century at that). The adults paid to be in charge have retreated to a safe place, where never is heard an encouraging word and the skies are cloudy all day.

Illustration on fixing the net neutrality law by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Controlling the nation’s internet

Do you remember the last time you had an issue with your internet connection and the federal government cheerfully helped you resolve it? Me neither. Yet the same federal government who spent $2 billion on a website that was more likely to dish out electric shocks than work properly is now literally in control of our nation’s internet, under the false rubric of promoting “net neutrality.”

Immoral Illegal Drugs Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why buying illegal drugs is immoral

Purchasing illegal drugs is an immoral act, regardless of where one stands in the legalization debate. When drugs are legally prohibited, criminal organizations assume control of production and distribution, making violence inherent in the process. Drug proceeds are used to fund criminal and terrorist organizations, enabling them to murder innocent people, attack police and military, bleed our tax dollars, and destroy the rule of law.

Illustration on gun control debate by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Challenging inaccurate information about guns

When you receive glowing media attention and have hundreds of millions of dollars to spend, you don’t really have to debate. Michael Bloomberg just announced last week that he would be putting $25 million into next year’s House and Senate races. From 2013 to 2016, he donated $48 million toward congressional races. By contrast, the NRA contributed a measly $2.1 million. And Mr. Bloomberg spent about 85 percent more on lobbying, more on television advertising, and much more for state and local political races.

Illustration on the Clinton campaign by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How Hillary doomed her ‘inevitable presidency’

While we’re examining the accomplishments of Donald Trump’s first 100 days — putting his man on the U.S. Supreme Court is the biggie — Hillary Clinton is getting the once-over (and the second and third) for all the reasons why she’s not the first woman to preside over her own first 100 days in the Oval Office.

Illustration on the Trump White House decision to broaden media access by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Talking right

President Trump did something Monday I have long advocated. He met with a small group of conservative journalists, pundits and radio talk show hosts. I was among them.

This May 23, 2016, file photo, shows the northernmost boundary of the proposed Bears Ears region, along the Colorado River, in southeastern Utah. Western Democrats are pressuring President Donald Trump not to rescind land protections put in place by President Barack Obama, including Utah's Bears Ears National Monument. Obama infuriated Utah Republicans when he created the monument on 1.3 million acres of land that is sacred to Native Americans. (Francisco Kjolseth/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP, File)

Go, Trump, go — pare back the national monuments

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump is taking aim at some of Barack Obama’s national monuments, as well as at designations made by other presidents. And this is great news. Terrific news. When it comes to the country’s national monuments, this White House’s attitude should be one of slash and burn — not conserve and preserve.

Illustration on the dangerous complications of the Obama/Iran nuke deal by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Tangled in Obama’s Iran nuclear trap

On April 18, the State Department certified Iran to be in compliance with its commitments under the Iran nuclear deal (Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA). As France’s iconic foreign minister, the Marquis de Talleyrand, once reportedly said: “This was worse than a crime; it was a mistake.”

Illustration on the sources of Trump's ideas by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The anatomy of a Trump decision

When Donald Trump’s Florida lawyer Paul Rampell first proposed turning the future president’s Mar-a-Lago estate into a private club, Mr. Trump pronounced the idea “dumb.” Over the next month, Messrs. Rampell and Trump argued back and forth about the idea until Mr. Trump finally agreed with Mr. Rampell.

DAY 40 - In this Feb. 28, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump, flanked by Vice President Mike Pence and House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., gestures on Capitol Hill in Washington, before his address to a joint session of Congress. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, file)

Ending the threats of a government shutdown

We are looking at another potential federal government shutdown this week. The high drama over passing a budget, passing spending bills under regular order, and the lifting of the debt ceiling has gone on for far too many years.

Illustration on a possible replay of 1927 for the Democrat party in 2020 by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Will 2020 be another 1972 for Democrats?

The year 1968 was a tumultuous one that saw the assassinations of rival candidate Sen. Robert F. Kennedy and civil rights icon Martin Luther King Jr. Lyndon Johnson’s unpopular lame-duck Democratic administration imploded due to massive protests against the Vietnam War.

Democrats can’t chart their way forward in this wilderness

Like most minority parties that lose the White House, the Democratic Party is without a national leader. Their legislative caucuses in the House and Senate have elected leadership, but the party itself has several elected officials fighting to lead it into the future, all with an eye toward 2020. And the party’s most visible figures aren’t exactly fresh faces.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton gives an acceptance speech after accepting the Trailblazer Award during the LGBT Community Center Dinner at Cipriani Wall Street on Thursday, April 20, 2017, in New York. (AP Photo/Kevin Hagen) ** FILE **

The Democratic Party’s ‘Gong Show’

Finally, the Democrats admit it wasn’t the Russians, James B. Comey or sexism that brought Hillary Clinton down. We are now told by journalists, leading Democrats, and even a former Democratic presidential candidate, that it was the inept dysfunction of the party itself, Hillary, and her abused and frightened team that has reduced them all to irrelevant, vapid political busybodies.

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A man walks up the steps of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals building Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017, in San Francisco. A federal appeals court refused Thursday to reinstate President Donald Trump's ban on travelers from seven predominantly Muslim nations, dealing another legal setback to the new administration's immigration policy. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

Sanctuary cities ruling a despicable sign of lawless times

- The Washington Times

My, how far we've come. Used to be a time when the Constitution was the country's rule of law, the Bible and its Judeo-Christian principles, the national moral compass. Now? That prize goes to the ones with the loudest mouths, deepest pockets and -- even more shamefully -- most activist courts on their sides.

The Death of Obamacare Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Not letting the Obamacare crisis go to waste

Republicans should take a lesson from Democrats. During President Obama's battle to enact Obamacare, his chief of staff, Rahm Emanuel, famously said, "You never want a serious crisis to go to waste. What I mean by that is an opportunity to do things you could not do before."

Afghanistan Peace Plan Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Resolving the Afghanistan crisis

The U.S.-led war in Afghanistan has not only continued unabated for over 15 years, making it America's longest war, but has no end in sight.

In this April 25, 2017 photo provided by ABC 7 Eyewitness News in New York, a wooden hammock lay on the sidewalk in New York. Police say that an tourist from England was injured and taken to the hospital when the hammock fell from the building she was talking near and struck her. Police believe wind may have blown the wooden framed hammock off the building's terrace. (ABC 7 Eyewitness News via AP)

Taking the cuffs off the cops

The Obama Justice Department made a habit of federalizing local police forces by threatening litigation and securing a settlement in the form of a consent decree. That turned out to be an exercise in anti-police bias which, happily, Attorney General Jeff Sessions is now reversing.

FILE - In this March 18, 2017 file photo, Congressional candidate Rob Quist meets with supporters during the annual Mansfield Metcalf Celebration dinner hosted by the state's Democratic Party in Helena, Montana. He is trying to fire up the party faithful in his race against Republican Greg Gianforte in a May 25 special election to fill Montana's sole congressional seat. (AP Photo/Bobby Caina Calvan, File)

Hiding his socialism beneath a cowboy hat

- The Washington Times

Fresh from special election defeats in Kansas and Georgia, Democratic professionals and activists alike are focusing on the election to fill Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke's Montana congressional seat as one more chance to chip away at the Republican majority in the House.

A war started by 'carnivorous lemmings'

Today's visitors to the older sections of Charleston, S.C., find themselves in an enchanting time warp. The beguiling facade of the antebellum South -- the mannerly charm, the tastefully understated elegance, even the dignified courtesy of the mostly black service personnel -- all reflect the surface allure of an elegant way of life that has mostly gone with the wind. Happily, what little remains now is supported by the tourist trade rather than by slave labor.

Scalpel, not hatchet fixes voter rolls

In a recent editorial, The Washington Times urges the League of Women Voters and Common Cause to join an effort by Judicial Watch to remove voters from the registration rolls in Montgomery County, Maryland ("Preserving voting rights in Maryland," April 23). Based on our knowledge of Maryland's voter-registration system, we cannot support this misguided effort.

Help or get out

House Speaker Paul Ryan has served in the U.S. House of Representatives since 1999. Prior to becoming speaker in October, 2015, Mr. Ryan served on the House Ways and Means Committee as well as on the House Budget Committee. With all of this experience, why didn't he have a health-care bill ready? Why didn't he have a budget bill? A tax-reform bill?

U.S. special representative for North Korea policy Joseph Yun, center, answers questions from reporters following meeting with Japanese and South Korean chief nuclear negotiators to talk about North Korean issues at the Iikura Guesthouse in Tokyo Tuesday, April 25, 2017. North Korea marks the founding anniversary of its military on Tuesday, and South Korea and its allies are bracing for the possibility that it could conduct another nuclear test or launch an intercontinental ballistic missile for the first time.   U.S. envoy Yun says he and his counterparts from Japan and South Korea agreed to coordinate "all actions" on North Korea. (Toru Yamanaka/Pool Photo via AP)

Getting serious about North Korea

President Trump has called the entire U.S. Senate to the White House Wednesday for a rare top-level briefing on what's going on with "the crazy fat kid" in North Korea. The president will have all hands on deck and he expects 100 senators to be there. They'll be greeted by Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, Defense Secretary James Mattis, Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats and Gen. Joseph Dunford, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

President Trump has arguably done more than his predecessors to get the border wall along the U.S. frontier with Mexico finally realized. Despite congressional promises, little construction progress has yet been made. (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

A barrier to the wall

The U.S. government just dodged a headlong run into a wall. Democrats threatened to vote against an interim budget deal if President Trump includes a down payment on a wall on the southern border. It's a mark of the lengths politicians of the liberal persuasion will go to destroy the Trump presidency. National security is held hostage in a high-stakes game of chicken.

Former President Barack Obama pauses as he hosts a conversation on civic engagement and community organizing, Monday, April 24, 2017, at the University of Chicago in Chicago. It's the former president's first public event of his post-presidential life in the place where he started his political career. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

Obama to net $400,000 in 'fat cat' speech

- The Washington Times

Well, well, well. Guess Barack Obama, who spent much of his eight years in the White House pointing critical fingers at Wall Street and Big Business, isn't as adverse to the buck as he lets on. The ex-prez is about to earn $400,000 to deliver a speech at a Wall Street conference being run by Cantor Fitzgerald LP -- the same type of people Obama used to blast as "fat cats."

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel speaks during a press conference where sanctuary cities, which don't arrest or detain immigrants living in the U.S. illegally, and Chicago violence, two issues raised by President Donald Trump, were discussed on Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Matt Marton) ** FILE **

Chicago's Rahm Emanuel pushing more gun control

- The Washington Times

Yes, this is probably the way to go -- when criminals holding illegally owned firearms shoot and kill and pour blood into the city streets, the way to make the community safer is to rip guns out of the hands of legal and permitted owners. That sounds about right. You go, Chicago.