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President Donald Trump boards Air Force One at Morristown Municipal airport, Sunday, Sept. 24, 2017, in Morristown, N.J. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Critics call Trump ‘self-interested’ like it’s a bad thing

- The Washington Times

As a businessman, a builder and a real estate tycoon in the most fiercely competitive real estate market on the planet, President Trump has spent his entire life exercising his own considerable self-interest. He built a huge and admirable fortune trying to make a buck for himself.

Illustration on the rise of materialism and anti-religious bigotry on Capitol Hill by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hate, Bernie style

Two remarkable things unfolded last week. The Democrats openly embraced socialism in the form of single-payer health care. And they announced a secular, anti-Christian test for public office. The two go together like Abbott and Costello. Or better yet, since this is far from funny, Marx and Lenin.

Illustration on CIA use of drones by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The CIA’s drones fly into a storm

The Central Intelligence Agency’s authority to use lethal force is usually discussed only in the quietest corners of the intelligence community. These authorities are usually implemented pursuant to carefully-prescribed top-secret “presidential determinations” that authorize specific actions.

Justin Kandor Causing Trouble in New Hampshire Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Some New Hampshire candor about Jason Kander

Let America Vote founder Jason Kander is a smirking menace. The former Missouri secretary of state wants to come to New Hampshire, cast aspersions on our elections, and use his wokeness as a springboard to bigger things.

George McGovern. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The sad tale of two stumbling parties

- The Washington Times

We’ve heard the words and music of this song before. The hoariest cliche in American politics, presented as accomplished fact by every wise head in academe and media after every wipe-out election, is that the losing party is finished. Kaput. Destroyed. Done for. Dead, as in the graveyard.

Royhingya refugees from Myanmar receiving food from Bangladeshi aid workers          Associated Press photo

A refugee emergency and the terrorism it breeds

Bangladesh has been a haven for the Rohingya people since they began fleeing unprovoked oppression in their home state of Rakhine on Myanmar’s western shore, bordering Bangladesh, in 2015. Denied citizenship in their own country, the Rohingya have been in conflict not only with the other citizens of Rakhine but also with the government of Myanmar, which considers many of them to be anti-government insurgents. The United Nations describes the Rohingya as one of the world’s most persecuted people.

Trump's Door and Wall Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

MAGA and DACA

What does it mean to ‘Make America Great Again’? That’s a seemingly simple question with no simple answer, but an important part of it is certainly fixing our broken systems.

Illustration on possible solutions to the North Korea situation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump, the statesman, at the U.N.

President Trump is right. His speech at the United Nations was his third act of Reagan-like statesmanship, after the historically accurate, morally rooted and inspirational speeches in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and Warsaw, Poland. This time, he pointedly spoke for those who cannot speak in Iran, North Korea, Venezuela, and suppressed people around the world. It was a tour de force, and it’s hard to disagree with any word. Once again, Ronald Reagan would be nodding.

Illustration on Russia's attacks on Ukraine by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

Taking Putin seriously

President Trump mentioned the word sovereignty 21 times in his address to the United Nations Tuesday, but said little about Russia’s efforts to seize parts of Ukraine, piece by piece, and threaten other neighboring states.

In this June 2, 2017, file photo, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt speaks to the media during the daily briefing in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

Scott Pruitt, in fight for EPA life — literally

- The Washington Times

Scott Pruitt, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, has apparently generated so much controversy that radical green peeps are threatening him with near-regularity, to the point he’s now getting extra armed protection. Seriously, folks, some perspective, please. Are trees that important?

Angst of the Loser Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The perennial taste of sour grapes

On her current book tour, Hillary Clinton is still blaming the Russians (among others) for her unexpected defeat in last year’s presidential election. She remains sold on a conspiracy theory that Donald Trump successfully colluded with Russian President Vladimir Putin to rig the election in Mr. Trump’s favor.

Related Articles

Illustration on President Trump's impending legal troubles by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump's tightening legal noose

The Donald Trump I know is a smart guy who often thinks a few steps ahead of those whose will he is trying to bend. But I lately wonder whether he grasps the gravity of the legal peril that is beginning to show up around him.

Steering clear of 'neighborhood clashes' in Asia

East and South Asia have been more prone to wars over sovereignty issues than any other region in the world since World War II. India-Pakistan and China-India conflicts were frequent in the 1960s. Communist countries in East Asia have not been immune from fighting each other. Soviet Russia and China clashed in border disputes, as have Vietnam and China.

President Donald Trump walks to his seat after speaking during a luncheon with African leaders at the Palace Hotel during the United Nations General Assembly, Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017, in New York. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Premature applause for the Trump trio

The point of political affiliation, like fan loyalty, is to join a team to win. Donald Trump promised voters weary of being beaten like a drum that if he were elected they would soon "get sick of winning." That hasn't happened. Yet. So it shouldn't surprise anyone that most Americans are cheering the president for linking up with the Democrats to post some victories. They might restrain the high-fives, though. Those triumphs come with a hefty price tag.

More pain and suffering on campus

History is complicated, and rarely is anything settled about the facts of what happened, and why, in wars, revolutions and crusades past. Historians are the first to say that those who think they know it all usually don't. But it's usually the ignorant who yell the loudest.

Campuses run by mob rule

Long ago and far away faculties ran universities, and students, by in large, got a good education. Today universities are run by professional administrators and campus mobs. What students get can hardly be described as a good education ("Nine arrested at Ben Shapiro speech as Berkeley officials express 'relief' that protest wasn't worse," Web, Sept. 15).

Cops who shoot innocents must pay

Does anyone remember the case of the Minneapolis police officer killing an unarmed Australian woman a few months ago? In case you have forgotten, Justine Damond called 911 because she thought someone was being sexually assaulted outside her home. After the police showed up, she walked out to their car. Officer Mohamed Noor killed her.

President Donald Trump talks with reporters about the Graham-Cassidy health care bill during a meeting with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi at the Palace Hotel during the United Nations General Assembly, Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017, in New York. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump takes leadership reins, pushes top items of agenda

First, President Trump marshalled the full attention and focus of the federal government in response to hurricanes Harvey and Irma, winning broad praise for the federal government's response. Criticism has not come, despite the size and scope of the storms and the harsh partisan atmosphere.

MSNBC co-host Joe Scarborough slammed the left-wing violence in Berkeley, California, over the weekend, saying there's nothing "anti-fascist" about using force to shut down free speech. (MSNBC)

Joe Scarborough agrees: Trump's U.N. speech a winner

- The Washington Times

MSNBC's Joe Scarborough, normally no fan of Donald Trump's -- to put it mildly -- nonetheless came out in defense of the president's speech before the United Nations. In short, Scarborough actually liked it. Check the skies for flying pigs.

Protesters march in support of former quarterback Colin Kaepernick outside Ford Field and an NFL football game between the Detroit Lions and the Arizona Cardinals in Detroit, Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Jose Juarez)

Colin Kaepernick: Apologize

- The Washington Times

Colin Kaepernick, the quarterback known these days more for his on-field displays of anti-Americanism than for his tossing skills, now says he's ready to play. Well, isn't that special. No apology? No play. That's what I say, anyway.

A Chinese honor guard member is caught in his flag as he stands at attention during a welcome ceremony for Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

Assessing Chinese imperialism

If you have not heard of One Belt, One Road you are missing what could be the landmark tale of this entire century. It is a saga of China's grand strategy that could threaten American interests at every level.

Illustration on Hillary's newest book by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

'Hillary, here is what happened'

What did I tell you? Late in November of last year, after the presidential election that finally ended the Clintons' 24-year pursuit of power in Washington and their diminishment of the Democratic Party, I wrote that the Clintons were finished. I had consulted my sources. What is more, I reported that on election night Hillary had a "meltdown." That is why she never showed up to thank her supporters who were milling around New York City's Javits Center all night. Few others in the media reported it. Yet now I have still more evidence, provided by Hillary herself.

Easy Pickin's Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The real danger to U.S. national security

President Lyndon Baines Johnson (LBJ) was usually more interested in delivering tirades than seeking advice, but in February 1968 LBJ needed answers. According to Gen. William Westmoreland, the commander of U.S. Forces in Vietnam, the unanticipated Tet Offensive had transformed the Vietnam War. If LBJ wanted to win the war in Vietnam, Westmoreland and the Joint Chiefs insisted they needed 200,000 more troops.

Illustration on protectionism from Whirlpool by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When the government plays referee in a competitive market

Whether intentional or not, a lot of President Trump's rhetoric on trade, both as a candidate and since, has rekindled in some pundits a teary-eyed nostalgia for protectionism. Odes to America's working class, who are seemingly cast aside in our nation's quest for cheaper, foreign-made products, have proliferated our airwaves and dominated political pages.