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President Trump listens as Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi speaks during a meeting in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. In an eventful week of politics, Mr. Trump will need to restore his credibility so he can handle the next crisis, says Matt Mackowiak. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

President Trump will need to rebuild his credibility for the next crisis

While President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee held up superbly under long days of confirmation hearings questioning, and the administration and the House GOP leadership furiously worked to assemble votes for the Obamacare replacement bill, the scene at Monday’s House Intelligence Committee hearing verged on the truly incredible.

Illustration on the Class of '21 by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Class of ‘21, in hot pursuit of their Brave New World

The college Class of ‘21 is racing with caught breath and trembling fingers to check their email, pick up their snail mail, and steel themselves to read those college acceptance and rejection letters. Many schools have already dispatched congrats and regrets to thousands of applicants, and the Ivies still have a week to go before they put their letters in the mail.

Illegal Voter Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

From Free State to sanctuary state

- The Washington Times

Maryland is quite a place. The state’s voters elected a Republican governor in 2014, but control remains in the hands of the same “progressives” who enjoy veto-proof majorities in both houses of the legislature on most issues. They vote as if former Gov. and presidential wannabe Martin O’Malley is still ruling the roost in Annapolis.

Henry Sanchez, 18, is one of the students charged with rape. (Associated Press)

Maryland’s ‘safe’ environment

A rough translation of Maryland’s state motto is “Strong Deeds, Gentle Words.” In the case of a 14-year-old girl who was recently raped and sodomized in a restroom at Rockville High School by two males students, both immigrants, one facing a deportation hearing, that motto in practice has been reversed.

Illustration on the confirmation of Neil Gorsuch by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

When politicians judge jurists

I have spent this past week watching the Senate Judiciary Committee interrogating U.S. Circuit Judge Neil Gorsuch. Judge Gorsuch is President Trump’s nominee to fill the vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Military Buildup House of Cards Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The dangers of loose talk about winning wars

On several occasions, President Trump has exclaimed that America would start “winning” its wars again. Although these seemingly sensible announcements had a pleasing resonance among the many, it overlooked the obligations of serious strategic analysis.

Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 22, 2017, during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Democrats’ blinkered look at Gorsuch

There was a remarkable exchange between Sen. Dianne Feinstein, ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, and Judge Neil Gorsuch, President Trump’s nominee to replace Justice Scalia on the Supreme Court, during Tuesday’s confirmation hearing.

Illustration on Kim's North Korea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump’s pivot to North Korea

America can do anything but America can’t do everything, at least not within a four-year time frame. That suggests that the American president — any American president — needs to prioritize.

Illustration of Chuck Brunie by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Chuck Brunie, an investor exemplar

What are more important to the health of an intellectual movement, writers and academics or investors and philanthropists? That thought occurred to me when I was informed of the death of Chuck Brunie, the former longtime chairman of the board of the Manhattan Institute and the chairman emeritus of The American Spectator.

Illustration on the sixty vote threshold rule in the Senate by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The pernicious no-debate filibuster

As habitually practiced since only the mid-1990s, by doing absolutely nothing, with almost no accountability accruing to them (using the “no-debate stealth filibuster”), the minority in the U.S. Senate can easily — and nearly always — either stop every legislative effort from even coming to the floor, or far more insidiously, sabotage it.

White House press secretary Sean Spicer speaks to the media during the daily press briefing at the White House, Tuesday, March 21, 2017, in Washington. Spicer discussed healthcare, immigration, and other topics. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Fake legal standing

The Hawaii federal court’s recent nationwide block of President Trump’s new executive order on immigration is troubling. The court’s decision turns on its head the important requirement that persons have legitimate “standing” to invoke the power of the federal courts.

Unanswered Questions in the Mideast Conflicts Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A slippery slope in Iraq and Syria

The good news is various forces are attacking ISIS (the Islamic State) and its control of territory is weakening. But as it does, historical adversaries are converging on the battlefield and American troops are standing between them in ever-increasing numbers. What began as limited airstrikes has become an American ground presence. Changes begun in the previous administration continue in the current one.

Energy Industry Red Tape Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Declaring energy independence

The United States is about to reach a major energy milestone. A new government report predicts that the nation is on track to become a net energy exporter within the decade.

President Donald Trump speaks at the National Republican Congressional Committee March Dinner at the National Building Museum, Tuesday, March 21, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) ** FILE **

The Trump budget and Big Bird

The liberal fainting couch continues to get a workout. Since President Trump announced his budget last week, the poor liberal base has been pummeled with hysterical headlines announcing Mr. Trump’s desire to destroy the Meals on Wheels program. Once he’s done with that, he’ll murder Big Bird. And then after that, the evil and depraved genius has figured out how to completely eradicate all the “arts” in America.

Related Articles

This Dec. 9, 2016 image released by NBC shows Arnold Schwarzenegger, the new boss of "The New Celebrity Apprentice," at a press junket in Universal City, Calif.  Schwarzenegger said Friday that he's through with "The New Celebrity Apprentice," and he's blaming President Donald Trump for the television reality show's recent poor performance. The former California governor said he wouldn't mind working with NBC and producer Mark Burnett again "on a show that doesn't have this baggage." (Paul Drinkwater/NBC via AP)

Hey, Ahh-nold: Trump won. Let it go

- The Washington Times

Arnold Schwarzenegger -- remember him? He used to star in some of Hollywood's hottest films, some decades back -- has taken to Twitter with a 40-second rant against President Donald Trump. It's self-promotion, at its worst.

FILE- In this Dec. 15, 2016, file photo, Judge Andrew Napolitano waits for an elevator in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York. Fox News Channel has pulled legal analyst Napolitano from the air after disavowing his on-air claim that British intelligence officials had helped former President Barack Obama spy on Donald Trump.  The move was first reported by The Los Angeles Times on Monday, March 20, 2017. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Fox benches Napolitano amid wiretap fizzle

- The Washington Times

The fallout from President Donald Trump's wiretapping claims against Barack Obama have turned from the White House toward Fox News, and now, according to several reports, Andrew Napolitano, the outlet's frequent "Judge Napolitano" legal commentator, has been benched. Eh. He'll be back. And back soon -- rightly so.

In this June 22, 2016 photo, Border Patrol agents stands near a border structure in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

Illegal? Travis County, Texas, is the place to be

- The Washington Times

The Department of Homeland Security is playing the shaming game, and releasing name of jails in local communities that won't get in lawful line and honor detainer requests from the federal authorities. Good. And the award for Best Place to Get Arrested as an Illegal is ... Travis County, Texas.

File - This Monday, Dec. 21, 2015 file photograph provided by the Israeli Ministry of Defense shows a launch of David's Sling missile defense system. A senior Israeli air force official says a joint U.S.-Israeli missile interceptor will be operational soon, completing the country's multi-layer defense system. He said Monday that David's Sling, meant to counter medium-range missiles possessed by Iranian-backed Hezbollah militants in Lebanon, will be operational in early April. (Ministry of Defense via AP, File)

The Strategic Defense Initiative at 34

When a politician promises something that "holds the promise of changing the course of human history," we naturally assume it's typical overstatement. But when President Ronald Reagan said that on March 23, 1983, in reference to his Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI), he was exactly right.

Obamacare Stain on the GOP Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Purity and politics

Readers of a certain age may recall ads for Ivory Soap, which claimed to be 99 and forty-four one-hundredths percent pure. If the soap could have reached 100 percent purity, the company would likely have made the claim.

President Donald Trump points as he speaks during a rally at the Kentucky Exposition Center, Monday, March 20, 2017, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Immigration Googlespeak

In the face of intense criticism of his initial executive orders restricting travel and immigration to the United States President Trump didn't back down and didn't double down. He and his administration calmly and methodically revised and then reissued them. That's the way things are done in the business world, or at least should be.

Illustration on Federal subsidies for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting by Linas GArsys/The Washington Times

Testing for turncoats

Do you think the federal government spends too much? Taxes too much? And should reduce the deficit? Most Americans agree except when it comes to specific spending programs they like. The people "hire" members of Congress to make these difficult choices. Much of what the federal government does is not authorized by the Constitution or justified by proper cost-benefit analysis, so is without merit.

Illustration on the subsidized nature of the American academy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why colleges lean left

Anti-right turbulence has again raised the question of why America's college campuses lean so left. The better question for those lamenting this lack of intellectual diversity is why its absence continues to surprise. It would be hard to find conditions more conducive to a leftward tilt than our campus Cominterns.

Illustration on PETA's euthanizing of animals by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Making a pet project of hypocrisy

Environment maven Al Gore selling his cable network to fossil-fuel-funded al Jazeera. Leonardo DiCaprio traveling thousands of miles on fuel-gobbling yachts and private jets while bemoaning climate change. PETA killing animals.

The spy among us

Everyone loves a good spy story. But it can be hard to tell if the story is fact or fiction; this is especially the case with spy memoirs. Jack Barsky's page-turning memoir, "Deep Undercover," has a ring of authenticity to it. Most of the book is written using recreated dialogue, but is it true?

Wiretap claim's good timing

A lot of folks are calling for "evidence" of the Trump Tower wiretaps. You don't start an investigation with evidence. That's what the investigation develops. You start with indications and develop the evidence or lack thereof. However, regardless of what the investigation unearths, President Trump's tactic and timing were brilliant.

This image released by Sesame Workshop shows Julia, a new autistic muppet character debuting on the 47th Season of "Sesame Street" on April 10, 2017, on both PBS and HBO. (Zach Hyman/Sesame Workshop via AP)

Curing addiction to government art

Big Bird doesn't live at the Public Broadcasting System anymore, but some people have not got the word. Big Bird has moved uptown to new digs at Home Box Office, a subsidiary of Time Warner. They've even moved the street where Big Bird and Oscar the Grouch live. Sesame Street runs off Columbus Circle in Manhattan now.

Vacation tips for Obama

It was interesting to read that former President Obama is vacationing in Tahiti ("Obama in Paradise: He's in Tahiti for a month," Web, March 16). This son of a World War II Pacific veteran (my late father was at the Battle of Midway) would suggest to Mr. Obama that he expand his travels to Guadalcanal, Saipan, Iwo Jima, the Coral Sea, Midway and Pearl Harbor so that he might appreciate the sacrifices made by the "Greatest Generation."

Hospital workers walk by a journalist on a stakeout checking his mobile phone outside the forensic department of Kuala Lumpur Hospital, where the body of Kim Jong Nam, exiled half brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong Nam, has been kept, in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Monday, March 20, 2017. Malaysian police said Sunday that they are hunting for more North Korean suspects over the killing of Kim Jong Nam who was poisoned to death at Kuala Lumpur's airport on Feb. 13. (AP Photo/Daniel Chan)

Taming North Korea

If demography is destiny, in North Korea the guiding force is ancestry. Like his grandfather and father before him, Kim Jong-un suffers delusions of grandeur, surrounded only by frightened sycophants, coveting a place among the world's important nations. As Pyongyang edges closer to building a working nuclear missile capable of reaching the United States, Mr. Kim must get the right response to his vow to annihilate his enemies. Tough talk from the United States and its allies is only a stopgap. The solution, short of war, lies with China.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., speaks with reporters at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, March, 14, 2017. The White House and Republican leaders in Congress are scrambling to shore up support for their health care bill after findings from the Congressional Budget Office estimated that 14 million people would lose insurance coverage in the first year alone under the GOP replacement for Obamacare. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

So you want truth, Schumer? You first

- The Washington Times

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, never one to shy from a chance to showcase the Republicans as bad for the people, has now stepped forward to use the president's previous wiretapping claims and Monday's hearings on Capitol Hill about said wiretapping to demand Donald Trump admit he was wrong -- right now, to the American people and to Barack Obama. What a bloviating showboat.

FILE - In this Tuesday, March 7, 2017, file photo, House Intelligence Committee Ranking Member Adam Schiff, D-Calif., speaks with reporters about the committee's investigation into Russia's involvement in the recent U.S. presidential election, on Capitol Hill in Washington. On Sunday, March 19, 2017, Schiff and House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes, R-Calif., were among a number of lawmakers who said on news shows they had seen no evidence that the Obama administration ordered wiretaps on Donald Trump during the campaign. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)

Schiff's disingenuous try at painting Trump as dangerous

- The Washington Times

For those who didn't have time to tune in to the House Intelligence Committee's hearing for the FBI's James Comey and the NSA's Michael Rogers, here's a hint of what you've missed: a Democratic take-down attempt of President Donald Trump. A Democratic ploy to showcase the president as dangerous to America's security.