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Marine Le Pen     Associated Press photo

The status quo survives in France, but in ruins

- The Washington Times

The French easily embrace contradiction and chaos. It’s what makes their politics work: “Plus ca change, plus c’est la meme chose,” and they said it first: “The more things change, the more they stay the same.” The Sunday national election in France proved it again.

Unrest in Venezuela Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Venezuela’s coming civil war

- The Washington Times

As American public attention has been focusing on terror attacks in Paris, the crisis in Syria and the nuclear-armed lunatic running North Korea, Venezuela to our south is about to explode into violence and civil war with incalculable consequences in our own hemisphere.

Illustration on the consequences of questioning current conventional wisdom by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Shut up and go away

Columbia University, from which I have a degree, has set aside rooms where straight white males — like me — are told they are unwelcome. How should I respond to their annual fund drives?

Illustration on the recent Paris terror attack and the French national elections by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The police vs. the PC police

As is almost always the case, signs of trouble preceded the latest shooting in Paris, which left one police officer dead and wounded two bystanders before police killed the gunman, later identified as French national Karim Cheurfi, a known criminal with a long, violent record. ISIS claimed to be behind the attack. According to police, a note praising ISIS fell out of Cheurfi’s pocket when he fell.

Better-educated Immigrants Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

One-upping Donald Trump’s crackdown on immigration

President Trump’s crackdown on immigrants committing crimes and employers abusing H-1B visas to replace qualified Americans with low-wage foreign workers may be welcome. However, those fall far short of the comprehensive reform needed to better align immigration policy with the needs of the country.

FILE - In this March 22, 2017, file photo, Antonio Reyes of Brownsville, Texas, stands by the U.S.-Mexico border fence near his home. Reyes said he's seen people scale the border fence that bisects his backyard and jump down in seconds. Sometimes they carry bales of what appear to be drugs. A higher wall is "still not going to stop them," he said. "They'll shotput it or whatever they have to do." (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)

Protecting our southern border with U.S. mariners

As chairman of the Coast Guard and Maritime Subcommittee in the House of Representatives, I am proud to be an unwavering defender of the Jones Act — a critical U.S. national security law that requires vessels moving from one U.S. port to another must be U.S.-built and U.S.-crewed.

Illustration on CUFI by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A boost for U.S.-Israeli ties

“An unidentified guest uses a Trump Hotel branded umbrella as she walks into the West Wing of the White House,” read the caption of an Associated Press photo in the Washington Examiner picturing an attractive young woman whose face is becoming increasingly familiar in Washington political circles.

Constitutional Change in Turkey Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

What Turkey’s referendum reveals

The outcome of the Turkish vote on constitutional changes, notwithstanding lingering allegations of fraud, represents further evidence of a crumbling global status quo.

Catching Illegal Voters Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Protecting the right to vote

A jury of 10 women and two men in Tarrant County, Texas, found Rosa Ortega guilty of voting illegally and sentenced her to eight years in jail.

Illustration on the Trump dollar by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Donald Trump’s dollar

President Donald Trump’s assertion this week that the “dollar is getting too strong” led to a sharp decline in the value of the greenback.

Illustration on the true intent of the Muslim Brotherhood by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Earning its terrorist designation

In an April 11 Brookings Institution report titled “Is the Muslim Brotherhood a terrorist organization?” senior fellow Shadi Hamid states that the Trump administration’s proposed designation of the Muslim Brotherhood as a terrorist group “could have significant consequences for the U.S., the Middle East, and the world.”

Bill O'Reilly (Associated Press)

The high price of Fox hunting

- The Washington Times

The famous bimbo eruptions are back (as if they had ever really gone away), and for once Bubba appears to be in the clear. No new accusations of rude behavior have been lodged against him.

Illustration on a poll-driven view of America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Misleading polls and fake news

Newscasts continue to be filled with references to polling numbers that suggest President Trump and his policies are deeply unpopular, and that the American people overwhelmingly oppose the actions taken by America’s 45th president during his first 100 days in office.

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Dr. Jumana Nagarwala (henryford.com)

Genital mutilation takes a hit

A Michigan physician was charged this week with the ritual mutilation of the genitals of two sisters, one 6 and the other 7 years old, revealing a sordid -- and illegal -- practice in certain Muslim communities that has put up to 500,000 young American girls at risk of this barbaric mutilation.

GOP good at splitting own vote

The crowded field in Georgia's 6th Congressional District election (11 Republicans vs. one Democrat) poses the question of whether Georgians are aware of the perils of splitting the vote within their own party. They came very close to snatching defeat out of the jaws of victory. Either they are very young voters or they have forgotten history.

U.S. airlines must up service game

I read with great interest "Trump signs executive order for 'buy-American, hire-American' policy" (Web, April 18). Last week I flew on American Airlines from Philipsburg in St. Maarten to Charlotte, North Carolina. To the passengers' surprise, there was no in-flight media entertainment on the flight, which lasted four hours and 16 minutes.

Eat real food, not carbs

Ever hear the one about the medical professional who proclaimed that 80 percent of what medical doctors do is not backed by double-blind, randomized, controlled trials? Unfortunately, it's no joke. For the uninitiated, these trials are the best way to demonstrate cause and effect. The implication: Medical quackery is alive and well in your doctor's office. Medical mistakes are the third leading cause of death.

Mike Huckabee hates Comcast, too

- The Washington Times

Apparently, having a "former presidential candidate" or "former governor" next to your name doesn't get you any better Comcast cable service than the average no-name Joe. Just ask Mike Huckabee.

New York billionaire George Soros spent $7 million on Democrats in election races in 10 states to try to influence criminal justice reform from the inside. In two such contests, outspent Republicans dropped out before the election. (Associated Press)

George Soros and his shady $4.8 million U.S. taxpayer deal

- The Washington Times

George Soros, the self-declared billionaire philanthropist who amuses himself by capsizing and upsetting national economies and by pressing all-things-progressive in politics, has a curious expenditure of taxpayer cash in the amount of $4.8 million. Curiously enough, the money's been sent to Macedonia -- a country that leans conservative, in direct contrast to Soros' own personal political interests.

Former Fox News person Gretchen Carlson speaks during the Women in the World Summit at Lincoln Center in New York, Thursday, April 6, 2017. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

Gretchen Carlson, ex-Fox-er, presses Congress to fight for women, victims

- The Washington Times

Gretchen Carlson, one of the many now-former Fox News talents to come forward in recent months to speak of sexual harassment at the cable giant, is now pressing Congress to get in the employee rights game by passing a bill that would make it easier for workplace victims of criminal behaviors to come forward and sue -- without having to use the corporation's forced arbitration clause.

In this Feb. 1, 2017, file photo, a fire set by demonstrators protesting a scheduled speaking appearance by Breitbart News editor Milo Yiannopoulos burns on Sproul Plaza on the University of California, Berkeley campus. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)

Coulter, Milo, Rice and the loss of free-thinking at colleges

- The Washington Times

The latest college cave to petulant student demands involves Ann Coulter and Berkeley, and the cancellation of the conservative firebrand's speech over fears of violence. Hey, Berkeley, how about sending out the cops to deal with the law-breakers -- rather than squelching the free speech of the innocent?

A woman collecting money for charity stands next to a quote written on an information board at Tower Hill underground train station, written in defiance of the previous day's attack in London, Thursday, in this March 23, 2017, file photo. On Wednesday, a man went on a deadly rampage, first driving a car into pedestrians then stabbing a police officer to death before being fatally shot by police within Parliament's grounds in London. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham) ** FILE **

Charity keeps America free

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump's senior advisers, deep in the weeds of tax reform, are reportedly looking at ways to save the middle class by placing more financial responsibilities on the shoulders of the wealthy -- and part of the plan being discussed is to limit the level of deductions charitable organizations can take. This is the wrong way to go.

Emergence of Redneck Porn Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Redneck porn

The 20th century gave us a good many new literary genres. Modernism, Futurism, Dadaism. Later on there was Post-modernism, Structuralism, Deconstruction. And now there's a new literary genre: Redneck Porn.

Illustration on progressivism and government by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Apocalyptic liberalism

Shortly after the 2008 election, President Obama's soon-to-be chief of staff, Rahm Emanuel, infamously declared, "You never let a serious crisis go to waste."

Studio portrait of Bess Truman

First lady Melania's reclusive counterpart

First lady Melania Trump isn't alone in recent history to walk to a different social and activist beat in the nation's capital -- with her young son as her first priority. For a similar reason, Elizabeth Virginia Wallace Truman, better known as first lady Bess Truman, spent most of her White House years at home in Independence, Mo. To be sure, Bess never was content with the capital's attendant social activities, a feeling generated by her husband's first Washington service as a senator beginning in 1935.

Illustration on the March for Science by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Goose stepping for science

Imagine yourself in Moscow in 1950, taking part in a March for Science. Science in the Soviet Union had been suffering for many years under Trofim Lysenko, a third-rate biologist who promoted unsound agricultural policies.

North Korean school girls react upon seeing their photograph being taken as they walk along Mirae Scientists Street on Wednesday, April 19, 2017, in Pyongyang, North Korea. Tensions have spiked in recent weeks over North Korea's advancing nuclear technology and missile arsenal. But in Pyongyang, where war would mean untold horrors, few people seem to care much at all. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

What next with North Korea?

There was a moment at Press Secretary Sean Spicer's White House briefing Monday that was significant. Asked by a reporter about North Korea's missile launch last weekend, Mr. Spicer said the administration was aware of the launch and that "it failed." End of story. Next question, please.

Illustration on the Syrian conundrum by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

A sober look at the confusion in Assad's Syria

Was "Tomahawking" Syria for an alleged gas attack justifiable retribution, misfeasance, malfeasance or just a mistake? Was it a warning to China and North Korea as some have advanced? (This is the same line of thinking that bombing Hiroshima and Nagasaki was really aimed cautioning the Soviet Union.) Why would China, the "celestial kingdom," powerful in her own right, pay attention; why would North Korea, in the hands of a madman, even care?