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President Barack Obama eats shave ice with daughter Malia at Island Snow, Thursday, Jan. 1, 2015, in Kailua, in Hawaii during the Obama family vacation. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Obama lives in ignorance of Islamic threat

- The Washington Times

President Obama has a happy and untroubled life on Fantasy Island, where he lives in splendid isolation from the world where the rest of us live. He is never troubled by terrorists, whether Islamic, Jewish or Episcopalian. All rough places have been made plain, manna falls right on time every morning, the water is pure, clear and cold, and golf courses where everybody breaks par stretch to a happy oblivion. The ants never get into his pants.

Illustration on success and college degrees by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Scott Walker’s real-life diploma

Without a college degree you can go on to create a computer empire like Dell, Microsoft and Apple, build an airline company like Jet Blue, found an organic food company like Whole Foods, or just become a run-of-the-mill tech nerd and create WordPress, DropBox, Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Spotify, Threadless or Pinterest. But some say you can’t be president of the United States.

Underfunding of Charter Schools in D.C. Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The war on school choice in Milwaukee

Milwaukee public schools are doing their best to block the expansion of school choice in the city—and the kids are the ones suffering.

Global Isolation of Israel Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Using boycotts to delegitimize Israel

Symbols count. For many, what they want to believe determines what they consider true. Needless to say, many in the Middle East do not want to believe in Israel’s existence. As a consequence, Harper Collins one of the world’s largest publishing houses, sold English language atlases to schools in the Middle East that omit the state of Israel.

Skilled computer hackers love Cyber Monday, and sneaky business spikes on this day. (Denver Post via Associated Press)

Getting serious about cybersecurity

The Sony attack, courtesy of North Korean-sponsored cyberterrorists, was one of the biggest media stories to end 2014. Salacious information pulled from private emails was leaked to the press, who dutifully reported the embarrassing details of individuals’ private correspondence, not to mention various trade secrets, business plans and valuable intellectual property.

Illustration on the rate of black babies being aborted in America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Aborting black America

“Black lives matter” has become the slogan of anti-police protests across the nation, but the target of the protests is so misplaced that the motives of the so-called civil rights leaders behind the movement must be questioned. Do they really care about black lives? Or are they cynically exploiting isolated incidents, such as the death of Michael Brown, to inflame the black population and advance their own political interests?

An anonymous art installation showing a broken pencil is displayed on the pavement near the Charlie Hebdo office in Paris, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015. Terror attacks by French Islamic extremists should force the country to look inward at its "ethnic apartheid," the prime minister said Tuesday as four men faced preliminary charges on suspicion of links to one of the gunmen. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

Say no to walking on eggshells

People of the civilized world must say no to walking on eggshells around radical Islam and beyond.

A large component of the Obama administration's climate-change agenda is to restrict carbon dioxide emissions from existing power plants. Washington regulators set a goal of reducing CO2 emissions 30 percent by 2030, which would mostly target abundant and affordable coal-fired generation. (AP Photo/Andy Wong, File)

Global climate policy after Lima

In his State of the Union address, President Obama again confirmed that “saving the climate” remains one of his top priorities. Yet the recently concluded confab in Lima, Peru, didn’t really conclude anything — certainly no binding protocol to limit emissions of carbon dioxide — but “kicked the can down the road” to the next international gabfest in Paris, scheduled for December.

Illustration on the impact of anti-Semitism on France by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘First they came for the Jews’

A widely distributed political cartoon by Ranan Lurie, published after the massacre of four Jews in a kosher supermarket in Paris, depicts a tiny shrub above ground and just below the surface, supporting the plant, is a web of thick twisted roots spread in the design of the swastika.

If you peered into your neighbor's bedroom with a high-tech device, you'd be prosecuted or sued.  MANDATORY CREDIT; MAGS OUT; TV OUT; INTERNET USE BY AP MEMBERS ONLY; NO SALES

Who will keep our freedoms safe?

While the Western world was watching and grieving over the slaughter in Paris last week, and my colleagues in the media were fomenting a meaningless debate about whether President Obama should have gone to Paris to participate in a televised parade, the feds took advantage of that diversion to reveal even more incursions into our liberties than we had known about.

Related Articles

Illustration on the need for sanctions against Iran by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The case for deadline-triggered sanctions

Experienced negotiators know this: The side most willing to walk away from the table generally wins. The side that seems desperate for a deal loses. Yet President Obama is telling the entire world that he needs an agreement with Iran's rulers more than they need an agreement with him.

Give single mothers college chance

Peter Morici's language about single mothers in the op-ed about President Obama's proposal for free community college is problematic ("Obama's bogus community college giveaway," Web, Jan. 14). Mr. Morici creates a vision of the impoverished single mother who lacks confidence, suffers emotional distress, lacks reading and math literacy and is waiting in the wings to enter and disrupt institutions of higher education. He resorts to fear mongering to falsely warn of this "risky" type of student in effort to dissuade the public's approval of Obama's plan.

A downfall advanced by bad jewelry

It was a 2,800 carat diamond necklace that many people thought was ugly and it may be that Queen Marie Antoinette never either wore it or saw it, but it made a bitterly ironic contribution to the collapse of her world and her consequent death.

Illustration on accusations of racism against the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences by Alexander hunter/The Washington Times

Al Sharpton vs. Hollywood

Last week, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences unveiled its 2015 Oscar nominations. Popular movies, including "The Imitation Game," "Boyhood" and "The Theory of Everything," received some positive recognition. Other films, including "The LEGO Movie" and my personal favorite, "Mr. Turner," received lesser nominations or were snubbed in certain categories.

Illustration on pro-life millennial voters by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The abortion intensity gap

In 2008 and 2012, the Democrats trampled over Republicans when it came to mobilizing and recruiting the younger generation. In 2008, Barack Obama beat John McCain among 18- to 34-year-olds by 34 points; in 2012, Mitt Romney lost by 23 points to President Obama in the same age group. It was a trouncing by any standard.

Community Outreach through Athletics Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Choosing the challenging road to reconciliation

A few days ago I had the pleasure of sitting down with Edward Mullins, president of the Sergeants Benevolent Association of the New York Police Department, to discuss potential ways of improving community-police relationships. He has been working with outstanding community leaders like Pastor A.R. Bernard, and they sincerely want to achieve a highly successful outcome to a problem of trust that has spread throughout the nation.

Volunteers tie the wooden cross that was carried through the streets of Etna, Pa., a Pittsburgh suburb, to the larger cross in the cemetery where their annual "Drama of The Cross", service was done on Good Friday, Friday, April 18, 2014. Clergymen from Christian churches in the borough organize a trek with volunteers carrying the wooden cross through borough streets to the cemetery as part of their services for the holiday. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

A Christian's response to insult

In the aftermath of the Charlie Hebdo terrorist attack, it's worth recalling how Christians respond to insult, by turning the other cheek, forgiving our enemies, and loving those who persecute us.

Turkey's Cyprus incursion nothing new

Guy Taylor's "Newsmaker Interview" with Turkish Cypriot negotiator Ergun Olgun ("Cypriot union threatened by dispute over oil and gas rights," Web, Jan. 11) is a public relations ploy by Turkey to lure the public away from Turkey's latest violation of international law: its 'gunboat diplomacy' in the eastern Mediterranean and incursion into Cyprus' Economic Exclusive Zone (EEZ).

Chips off the block

Credit card fraud is everybody's headache. If the hackers haven't got to you yet, they will. There's a new weapon against the hackers, called "chip-and-PIN technology," but replacing a billion credit cards is expensive and some of the big banks are reluctant to put out the millions (and millions) of dollars to pay for it. The federal government is using chip-and-PIN cards but not many private users in the United States have access to it.

Former Navy SEAL and author of the book "American Sniper" Chris Kyle poses in Midlothian, Texas. (AP Photo/The Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Paul Moseley)

‘American Sniper’ hits close to home

From the Alamo to Audie Murphy, Texans revere our war heroes. As the closing credits for "American Sniper" rolled across the screen last weekend, a packed audience lingered in the dark silence, reverent and maybe stunned by what they had just seen. The reason: The movie depiction of Navy SEAL Chris Kyle's heroic life of service provided an increasingly rare glimpse of what were once unquestioned American truths.

Obama's persistent tax delusion

Apparently President Obama did not get the message that he and his party were trounced in the November elections. By handing the Senate to the Republicans and providing a larger GOP majority in the House, the American people voted for divided government, meaning that they want either gridlock or cooperation and production. I believe their overwhelming support for Republicans signifies an interest in the latter, yet one would not know it from the way the president is behaving.

No halo for Holder on forfeiture fix

Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. announced on Friday that the Justice Department would cease sharing confiscated private property with state and local police agencies under its Equitable Sharing program. Asset forfeiture has recently been widely denounced by both liberals and conservatives as an civil liberties atrocity that has victimized innocent Americans across the nation. A Washington Post report suggested that the policy change was part of Mr. Holder's efforts "to burnish his place in history."

After the Massacre Azerbaijan 1990

From tragedy to independence

Twenty-five years ago today, while then-President George H.W. Bush was delivering his State of the Union message before a joint session of Congress in Washington, Soviet troops attacked unarmed civilian protesters in the Azerbaijani capital of Baku, killing some 133 people and wounding hundreds of others.

Another White House gaffe

Last Friday Secretary of State John Kerry brought James Taylor to the stage to sing "You've Got a Friend" to the French people ("John Kerry in Paris, set for James Taylor croon: 'You've Got a Friend,'" Web, Jan. 16). It was widely seen as the Obama administration's way of saying sorry after failing to send any high-level officials to the "Je Suis Charlie" March in Paris, which was attended by 2.7 million people, including 40 heads of state.

Illustration on The State of the Union Address by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama sings the same old song

Here's a suggestion for Joni Ernst, the new Republican senator from Iowa, who will deliver the GOP response to the State of the Union address Tuesday night. Get a chorus together and open with this old Sammy Cahn-Jule Styne number: "It seems to me I've heard that song before; it's from an old familiar score, I know it well, that melody."

We're making it needlessly difficult for Americans to save and invest. That hurts job growth and depresses wages.



(Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)

The shared benefits of tax reform

Lawmakers in Washington have plenty of work ahead of them this year, so the temptation to punt on everything but the "hot" issues will be strong. Here's one they should tackle without hesitation: tax reform.

Gary Becker

The lions of liberty

People are a bit more free and prosperous as a result of the work of Gary Becker, John Blundell, Leonard Liggio, Gordon Tullock and Henry Manne, all of whom passed away during the last eight months.