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John Kennedy     Associated Press photo

Goats in the White House

- The Washington Times

It’s the conceit of every age that it’s uniquely entitled to all the superlatives: it’s the best, the worst, the biggest, the smallest. Nothing before was anything like the present age, nor is it possible that anything in the future will surpass it.

Illustration on the potential political rift presented by the upcoming election by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When an election produces a political realignment

What do the election years 1800, 1828, 1860, 1896, 1932 and 1980 have in political common? They are usually described as “critical” or “realigning” elections by historians who argue they produced a significant realignment in our political system.

President Barack Obama speaks at the 2016 White House Tribal Nations Conference held in the Mellon Auditorium in Washington, Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Another useless Iraq surge

Pessimists and cynics are annoying, mostly because events prove them to be right far more often than they are proven wrong. Sometimes pessimism is the necessary result of an examination of history.

Illustration on new moves toward animal liberation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Food for thought about animal liberation

Peter Singer, Princeton professor and author of the book “Animal Liberation,” will be taking his radical views center stage at the upcoming “The Future of Food” event in Washington, D.C. Hosted by the extremist Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), the choice of Mr. Singer to keynote the event offers a peek at just how out of touch animal liberation activists are: While Mr. Singer is against eating animals, he’s OK with the idea of having sex with them.

The Second Jacksonian Revolution Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When ‘deplorables’ took back their country

The 1829 inauguration of Andrew Jackson ranks as the most raucous in American history. Presidents in those days traditionally held open house for the general public after being sworn in, but no one anticipated that hordes of Jackson’s rough-and-tumble supporters would descend on the nation’s capital for the big day or that they would troupe over to the White House following his inaugural address to shake his hand and guzzle free booze.

Growing the American Economy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How to jump-start the economy

As the presidential debates get underway, we hope that the moderators set personalities aside and spend some quality time asking questions of both candidates about their plans to grow the American economy.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump waves to the crowd during a rally in Roanoke, Va., Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016. Trump faces Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton in the first of three debates Monday.  (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Terrorism, refugees and Donald Trump

Hilary Clinton’s refugee plan is an open invitation for Radical Islam’s unyielding nature to run roughshod over American culture.

Federal Land Grab Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Grinding westerners under the federal boot

The federal government owns an estimated one-third of all the land in the United States. But this is only a rough estimate, because even the federal government does not actually know how much land it controls.

Illustration on the contrasting media coverage of Hillary and Trump by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The apoplectic liberals

- The Washington Times

Is it journalistic malpractice to quote each side of the argument and leave it to readers to draw their own conclusions?

A study in nuclear contrast

Astudy in contrast: North Korea is killing itself to get an atomic bomb; Kazakhstan is rich because it gave its nukes away.

Charlotte police encountering protesters earlier in the week.           Associated Press photo

A riot that dares not speak its name

- The Washington Times

Charlotte is the conversation we’re getting about race in America, with rioting, death and looting, encouraged by the noise of the mob, the purple rhetoric of certain newspapers, bloody mayhem on the television screen, and encouragement, no doubt unintended, by the president of the United States. It’s a carnival out there, but not much conversation.

Illustration on two possible economic futures by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Liars, statistics and politics

This presidential season Americans have been treated to the usual outrageous campaign promises and extraordinary candidate alibis about past transgressions, but those pale in comparison to claims about gains in family incomes served up by the Obama administration last week.

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President Barack Obama greets people in the audience during a ceremony East Room of the White House, Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016, in Washington, after awarding the 2015 National Medals of Arts and 2015 National Humanities Medals. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The president's farewell tour

Sarah Bernhardt, the French superstar at the end of a career as "the most famous actress the world has ever known," famously set out on a farewell tour that was so successful she repeated it, several times.

Rep. Lewis deserves medal

The Philadelphia Liberty Medal is a highly reputable prize. Rep. John Lewis of Georgia is an excellent choice for this year's recipient ("John Lewis awarded Liberty Medal for civil rights work," web, Sept. 19). The prize has an established history and Mr. Lewis is an effective congressman.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign stop in Orlando, Fla., Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016.  (Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel via AP)

Answers for Hillary

Hillary Clinton is smart -- she has the academic credentials to prove it -- but she can't figure out why she isn't scoring above 50 percent in the public-opinion polls. Life on the hustings just ain't fair.

Call terrorism by its name

When will terrorist actions actually be called terrorism by the leaders of this country? After the explosion in New York City, Gov. Cuomo stated that there was no evidence of international terrorism connected to it.

Protesters surround a police vehicle in Charlotte, N.C. on Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2016. Authorities used tear gas to disperse protesters in an overnight demonstration that broke out Tuesday after Keith Lamont Scott was fatally shot by an officer at an apartment complex. (Jeff Siner/The Charlotte Observer via AP)

Rioting in North Carolina

Black lives matter, and they matter so much that everyone, black or white, is responsible for protecting them. That begins with demanding that "demonstrators" and "protesters" pay a little respect to the black lives they say they honor.

No purse from this sow

Fellow Democrats, wake up. There is nothing -- absolutely nothing -- in either the soul or the track record of Hillary Clinton that should make voters enthusiastic. Virtually every day a new scandal surfaces, and the rumors are that the really big scandals have yet to emerge ("Millennial voters spurning Clinton, but not for GOP," Web, Sept. 19).

Liberals' refugee penance

This week the United States welcomed its 10,000th Syrian refugee. There are 30,000 more waiting in line. This helping of distressed human beings is a big thrill to confused Democrats. It doesn't matter that last Sunday bombs were set off in New York and New Jersey, or that nine people were sliced with a cleaver in Minnesota. And what was the glue that connected these events? Muslim hatred of western values.

President Barack Obama speaks at the U.S.-Africa Business Forum at The Plaza Hotel in New York, Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Working overtime against the economy

Barack Obama is worried about the legacy he'll bequeath to history in just three months. Like all presidents he wants to be remembered as a good president if not a great president, but he keeps doing things that will render the memory of his presidency as something forgettable between the work of Chester Alan Arthur and Jimmy Carter.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Scorched Earth: Restoring the Country After Obama'

"Scorched Earth: Restoring the Country After Obama" by Michael Savage is just what you'd expect from the stalwart radio talk show host -- a no-holds-barred, tell-it-like-it-is recounting of leftist-controlled life under the Obama administration and warning of the potential dire decline of America if such administration policies continue under a Clinton presidency.

Illustration contrasting Trumpand Hillary on Islamic jihadism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

More terror, more denials

In Florida Monday, following the bombings in New York and New Jersey, Donald Trump referred to the captured bombing suspect, Ahmad Khan Rahami, as an "evil thug." He then added, "Hillary Clinton is a weak and ineffective person and I will tell you, if you choose Donald Trump, these problems are going to go away far, far greater than anybody would think."

Illustration on the 2016 presidential contest by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Pop goes the presidency

Every presidential campaign draws on familiar pop culture references to bring the candidates down to earth. Critics use the references to illuminate the differences between voters of different generations.

Trump Boxing Glove Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How Trump can knock out Hillary in the first debate

- The Washington Times

It promises to be the greatest show on earth: the first presidential debate to be held Monday night at Hofstra University in New York. Rarely has a political event attracted this kind of Super Bowl-level excitement, curiosity and anticipation. Then again, rarely have we had two presidential candidates who light up the political sky like Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.