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Barack Obama      Associated Press photo

Rough justice for Obama and the Saudis

- The Washington Times

Throwing a stone at Saudi Arabia, where stoning women is the national sport, is great fun, and nobody deserves an occasional stoning like the Saudis, just to let the king and his legion of princes know how it feels.

Illustration on the undermining of the Hyde Amendment by Linas GArsys/The Washington Times

The life-saving amendment

Today marks 40 years since the life-saving Hyde Amendment was first enacted. This annual appropriations amendment stops taxpayer dollars from being used to fund most abortions and abortion coverage through government programs like Medicaid.

A Complete Takeover Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

ISIS in the Middle East and now here

A comprehensive strategy to defeat Islamic supremacists must include not only a war plan to defeat the enemy on the active battlefields of the Middle East, but it must also address how to defeat this enemy now inside the United States.

Illustration contrasting the media vetting of candidates Obama and Trump by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A biased media in action

- The Washington Times

If Donald Trump becomes the next president of the United States he’ll be more thoroughly vetted by the media than Barack Obama.

FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012 file photo, smoke rises over Saif Al Dawla district, in Aleppo, Syria. Residents in the rebel-held districts of Aleppo have a reprieve from the incessant bombings by Syrian government warplanes and the promise of an end to the crippling siege that has left produce stalls bare. (AP Photo/ Manu Brabo, File)

Vladimir Putin’s bombings

Donald Trump, who has been Vladimir Putin’s chief U.S. apologist, remains strangely mute about the rising death toll caused by Russian airstrikes on Syrian hospitals and other civilians in Aleppo.

Madison Gesiotto, Miss Ohio 2014, also writes the 'Millennial Mindset' column for The Washington Times.

Why I’m a Miss USA competitor supporting and inspired by Donald Trump

The stage lights burned brightly. An audience of thousands stretched out into the dark recesses of the arena. I was standing on the Miss USA stage, a dream come true for so many young women and an incredible memory that I will treasure for years to come. But, an even greater experience that stemmed from my time at Miss USA was my time with Donald Trump.

Illustration on Israel's nuclear strategy in light of use of nuclear weapons by other actors by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

On the eve of new atoms

The first post-World War II employment of nuclear weapons will probably be launched by North Korea or Pakistan. Should circumstances actually turn out this way, the resultant harms would impact not only the aggressor state and its victims, but also selected strategic nuclear policies in certain other states. The most significant example of such an impact would likely be Israel.

A Bangladeshi rickshaw transports a passenger in Old Dhaka, Bangladesh, Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016. Rickshaws are the most popular means of public transport in Dhaka. (AP Photo/A.M.Ahad)

Restoring free trade with Bangladesh

Since achieving independence in 1971, Bangladesh has been a strong friend and ally of the United States. Once defined by humanitarian help and development support, the relationship between the United States and Bangladesh is now firmly based on bilateral trade and investment. Today, Bangladeshi products find their way into virtually every American household.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016, in Melbourne, Fla. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Voting for growth

Voters must shake up Washington if they want a more prosperous future.

FILE - In this Saturday, Aug. 13, 2016 file photo, a soldier from the 1st Battalion of the Iraqi Special Operations Forces listens to an address by his commander after a training exercise to prepare for the operation to re-take Mosul from Islamic State militants, in Baghdad, Iraq. The disparate groups that make up Iraq's security forces are converging on the city of Mosul, lining up for a battle on the historic plains of northern Iraq that is likely to be decisive in the war against the Islamic State group(AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo, File)

What to do when a ‘narrative war’ fails

Apologies to White House spokesman Josh Earnest, who this week claimed we are in a “narrative war” with the Islamic State, or ISIS, but here’s the only narrative that the current crop of jihadists will understand: “When I am president of the United States, I will be eager and able to unleash on you history’s biggest, baddest collection of warriors, and should you choose to oppose them on the battlefield, they will kill you and break your stuff. Guaranteed.”

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's bellicose attitude by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When the Donald is the dove

It’s interesting when a longtime Democrat and long-ago speechwriter for John and Robert Kennedy declares he will vote for Donald Trump. That’s what Adam Walinsky did in Politico Magazine the other day. It’s even more interesting when hostile Democrats rush to defend Hillary Clinton from Mr. Walinsky’s attack, as Peter Beinart did in an article in The Atlantic calling Mr. Walinsky’s piece an “absurd and dishonest essay.”

Egg Shell Helmet Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Inmates’ defective work

A scathing report of a joint investigation by the Justice Department’s Inspector General and the Defense Criminal Investigative Service found that the Bureau of Prisons’ Federal Prison Industries (FPI) produced more than 100,000 combat helmets that were defective and would “likely cause serious injury or death to the wearer.”

Fresh Start Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The human face of overcriminalization

A young man from a low-income family sells small amounts of marijuana when real opportunity eludes him. He’s arrested and incarcerated several times. After being convicted and serving his sentence, he leaves prison with a record that will follow him for the rest of his life.

Related Articles

Trump must save us from Clinton

Slamming Donald Trump is nothing new for the liberal media, but when it blindly endorses Hillary Clinton, who has a history of malfeasance, abuse of power and corruption, they hurt America and the people.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton shake hands during the presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Playing not to lose

All that trouble, all that anticipation of "the debate of the century," and all that anti-climax. Neither Donald Trump nor Hillary Clinton moved the needle so much as a millimeter.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Real Peter Pan: J.M. Barrie and the Boy Who Inspired Him'

J.M. Barrie was already a successful playwright when he fell in love with the Llewelyn Davies family -- mother, father, children -- and from this pivotal event, the most significant of his long life, would come the work for which he remains best known, "Peter Pan, Or the Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up."

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton are introduced during the presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Presidential debate winners and losers

- The Washington Times

To the probable consternation of his critics, Donald Trump came off as authentic and, compared to Hillary Clinton, the more likable of two much-disliked presidential wannabes in their first head-to-head presidential debate Monday night.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks during the presidential debate with Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Trump going after Clinton, but on the facts

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump is hitting Hillary Clinton on the facts. Yes, he's getting agitated, and raising his voice, and yes, sniffing - but he's being strong, and firm, and not sexist. He's making simple points, that resonate. He's getting in her face like no other Republican would dare, he's interrupting. She's battling him on his ground.

Erdogan no U.S. ally

Ali Cinar scales the heights of absurdity in trying to portray Turkey as a reliable American ally ("Turkey's critical anti-terror role," Web, Sept. 13). Turkey gave the Islamic State and the Nusra Front arms, free passage across the Syrian border, and even hospitals for their wounded. And now we're supposed to believe they're fighting the Islamic State?

Worse off under Obama

Does anyone else find it interesting that President Obama had to reach all the way back 150 years to slavery to find a time in which African-Americans were in a worse situation than they are now, after eight years of his administration ("Obama mocks Trump: Even 8-year-olds know slavery was bad for black people," Web, Sept. 23)?

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, left, stands with Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton before the first presidential debate at Hofstra University, Monday, Sept. 26, 2016, in Hempstead, N.Y. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

Beyond the debates

We heard a lot of promises Monday night, when Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton at last took the measure of each other face to face. Both the Donald and the gentle lady from the Clinton counting house were trying to show us how they would lead the nation, dispatch the nation's enemies and bestow all the free stuff that voters have come to expect as their due.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Lusitania: The Cultural History of a Catastrophe'

There have been so many books about the sinking by a German submarine of the British liner Lusitania off the Irish coast in May 1915 that you may well ask if we need another. Only the Titanic, felled by an iceberg three years earlier, spawned more books.

Illustration on reviving the war on drugs by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Declaring war on drugs, again

Repeat a lie often enough, the saying goes, and it becomes the truth. Take the war on drugs. As you've surely heard in everything from sneering editorials to unsourced memes on Facebook, it was a dismal failure. Heck, it made the problem worse.