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Ron Wyden (Associated Press)

The churls and their denial and grief

- The Washington Times

Life is not fair to losers, or the critics of Donald Trump, and the way he won the presidency. He just won’t stand still and give the rotten eggs a chance to hit their mark.

Illustration on the promotion of U.S. trade by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump’s nationalism will preserve international stability

Economists and foreign policy experts fear Donald Trump’s economic nationalism will disrupt the global institutions that have fostered international economic cooperation and security for seven decades and instigate chaos.

The selection of Betsy DeVos to run the Department of Education was likely an easy call for President-elect Donald Trump, who during the campaign regularly championed school choice and the charter school movement, giving a nod to school choice when announcing his pick. (Associated Press)

The administration billionaires

President-elect Donald Trump and his Cabinet nominees won’t be in office until next month, but the stock market is already showing bullish signs of better days ahead under his pro-growth, tax reform agenda.

Putting Off the Congo Elections Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The dangers of a hasty Congo election

The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has been the target of criticism in recent weeks with editorials in major newspapers calling on our president to step down.

Illustration of John Bolton by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘The man with the bushy moustache’

President-elect Donald Trump would be best served by selecting a secretary of State who understands the national security challenges our country faces, can literally “hit the ground running,” has a proven track record of successful negotiations, and most importantly, not only protects but projects the greatest attributes about America’s ideals of freedom and democracy.

Illustration on clueless, know-nothing spinning events in the Obama administration by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

27-year-old know-nothings

Many think as a society we have slipped past the line defining our ability to discern reality from political spin. On the other hand, we are generations of conditioned consumers who have been subjected to the most sophisticated ad campaigns ever imagined. In short, if there is or has ever been a way to sell something, we have heard or seen it.

Texas Border Security Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Quick fixes for border issues

Heroin deaths have crossed the 100 barrier as reported by the Police Department in Anne Arundel County, Md., on a billboard outside its headquarters in Millersville. At this rate, deaths may reach 120 by the end of the year. That would mean that 20 young residents of my county who are alive today will not live to see the New Year as a result of heroin and fentanyl illegally trafficked across the border into the United States from China and Mexico.

Ashleigh Dickerson and her daughter Christian, 10, talk with temporary neighbor Daron Brose, in the hotel where they are now living, in Denham Springs, La., Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016. Before the floods came, Ashleigh Dickersons family lived in a three-bedroom house on a private road with plenty of room for her young children to play. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Rules that wreck housing affordability

The White House recently released a report on housing affordability, pointing out that rental rates are rising faster than incomes in many cities, thanks to a lack of housing supply.

Dutch Canary Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The canary in the free speech coal mine

A safety practice used in the early days of coal mining involved the use of canaries. Since these birds were susceptible to the ill effects of deadly toxic gas exposure before humans, caged canaries brought into the mines were closely monitored as an early warning system of lurking danger.

Sally Abrahamsen (right), of Pompano Beach, Fla., holds a Glock 42 pistol while shopping for a gun at the National Armory gun store and gun range in Pompano Beach on Jan. 5, 2016. At left is salesperson T.J. O'Reilly. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Armed and alive

Sunrise, Fla.: A burglar was fatally shot Monday after breaking into a home in the 4300 block of Northwest 103rd Terrace in Sunrise, authorities said. Police said the suspect was taken to Broward Health Medical Center, where he later died.

Illustration on Trump's enthusiasm for India by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A ‘big fan’ of India waits in the wings

As the dust settles on the most divisive and rancorous election campaign in American history, India, like the rest of the world, is coming to terms with Republican Donald Trump as the next president of the world’s most powerful country.

Illustration on the liberal plaudits for Fidel Castro by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The liberal romance with Fidel Castro

There appears to be an awful lot of sympathy for the devil out there these days. The death of Fidel Castro, a mass murderer masquerading as a “president,” exposed the bizarre romance liberals have with tyrants.

Illustration on the problematic Zumwalt class destroyer by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Navy’s Zumwalt problem

Some problems in life are so big they defy summary, maybe even resolution. Still, they are important. On the list go societal differences about religion, politics, and now the U.S. Navy’s Zumwalt-class destroyer.

Donald Trump (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The melting of campus snowflakes

- The Washington Times

Academic freedom, once so popular in the faculty lounges, appears to be optional on many campuses where college presidents wilt under the first squeals of snowflakes.

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Illustration on making America great again by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

An American renewal

Slowly and perhaps even surely, Donald Trump is pulling together a team he believes can help him achieve his goals. Which are what exactly?

A Vietnamese policeman stands guard as a wreath and an image of the late Cuban President Fidel Castro are placed at the Cuban embassy in Hanoi, Vietnam, Monday, Nov. 28, 2016. Castro, who led his bearded rebels to victorious revolution in 1959, embraced Soviet-style communism and defied the power of 10 U.S. presidents during his half-century of rule in Cuba, died on Friday at age 90. (AP Photo/Tran Van Minh)

The demise of a despot

"We know that this moment fills Cubans with powerful emotions, recalling the countless ways in which Fidel Castro altered the course of individual lives, families, and of the Cuban nation."

Illustration on the infantile reaction of sore losers by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

'A pack of sore losers'

- The Washington Times

It was election night 1960 and as the votes trickled in, those surrounding Vice President Richard Nixon were convinced Democratic vote fraud in Illinois and Texas were about to cost their man the White House in the closest presidential election since 1840.

BOOK REVIEW: 'War Diaries 1939-1945'

It's no accident that the publisher of this book saw fit to put "Author of 'Pippi Longstocking'" after Astrid Lindgren's name, for that classic children's book is not merely the chief, but perhaps the sole, reason she is known.

Illustration on the Castor era by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The left's love affair with Fidel Castro

In a statement following the death of Cuban dictator Fidel Castro, President Obama spoke of "the countless ways in which [Castro] altered the course of individual lives, families, and of the Cuban nation."

A woman walks past a photo of the late Fidel Castro at a memorial to honor him in Guanabacoa on the outskirts of Havana, Cuba, Monday, Nov. 28, 2016. Tribute sites are set up in hundreds of places across the country to bid farewell Castro, who died on Nov. 25 at age 90. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

The death of a tyrant

Speaking ill of the dead is not nice, as most of us learn at mother's knee, but there are exceptions. Fidel Castro deserves no nice thoughts simply because he's dead. He was a despot and a tyrant, an unrepentant rogue with the conscience of a hangman, and we can be glad that he's dead.

More left-wing double standards

Since the average four-year-old can grasp the concepts of 'same' and 'different,' perhaps our entire society -- particularly the progressive left -- will see that there is no difference between Mathew Blanchfield, CEO of 1st in SEO, and the unfortunate business owners who refused to provide cake and floral services for gay weddings ("CEO Mathew Blanchfield tells pro-Trump, Republican clients to take a hike: 'You are not welcome,'" Web, Nov. 23).

Israel's 'wildfires' deliberate

Apologists claim that there are many Arabs who are against terrorism. If this were true, these anti-terror Arabs would humiliate their terrorist brothers and punish them. They would make the thought of terrorism anathema so that no one would burn or decapitate Israelis or Jews.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel. **File  (Lou Foglia/Chicago Sun-Times via AP)  MANDATORY CREDIT, MAGS OUT, NO SALES; CHICAGO TRIBUNE OUT

The Hole in the Wall Gang

Plain citizens probably shouldn't try this at home. Mayors of American cities large and small are obstructing the nation's immigration laws by harboring illegal aliens and boasting that they will defy anything President-elect Donald Trump can do about it.