Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Rosa Luxemburg (Associated Press)

Black Lives Matter and the endless war against the Jews

- The Washington Times

The man who controls the language controls the conversation, as George Orwell rightly observed. The word that the left is trying, with a certain success, to appropriate now is “genocide.” Genocide is what Hitler set out to do, to exterminate Europe’s Jews (and who knows where his evil ambition would have gone from there).

Federal Mismanagement of the Peanut Industry Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Politicians and peanut pilfering

The history of federal peanut policy is the perfect antidote to anyone who still believes that Congress could competently manage a lemonade stand. Federal spending for peanut subsidies will rise eight-fold between last year and next year — reaching almost a billion dollars and approaching the total value of the peanut harvest. This debacle is only the latest pratfall in a long history of horrendous federal mismanagement.

Hillary at the helm

- The Washington Times

”At long last,” she thinks. “My time has come. They’re now all here, fighting for me.”

Texas Bullet Train Project Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How private enterprise drives the trains

Texans are turning the tables on how to pay for nationally critical infrastructure projects, leading the way with a high-speed train project that relies on the expertise of private entrepreneurs instead of government money.

Law Enforcement at the Border Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Immigration reform must start with border enforcement

As a veteran border patrol officer, I can say without any reservations that our immigration system is completely dysfunctional. Immigrants permitted to come to the United States have a cumbersome and expensive time doing so. Those who aren’t permitted to enter waltz across the border by the tens of thousands, and those not allowed to remain here elude deportations, even after committing serious crimes against our citizens.

Palestinian Hamas supporters hold up their hands while chanting Islamic slogans as masked members from the Izzedine al-Qassam Brigades, a military wing of Hamas, march with their weapons on vehicles during a rally a long the street of Rafah refugee camp, Gaza Strip, Sunday, Aug. 21, 2016. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)

The next round of Hamas vs. Israel

Words can bewitch. Soon, the seemingly benign phrase “cycle of violence,” will be applied once again to the Hamas-Israel conflict. The linguistic effect of this application will be to equate terrorism and counterterrorism, further blurring the always-essential distinction between international crime and international law enforcement.

Elmar Abdullayev, 55, stands at a gates of his home hit by shelling in a village of Gapinli, in Terter region of Azerbaijan on Tuesday, April 5, 2016. Azerbaijan and separatist forces in Nagorno-Karabakhk on Tuesday agreed on a cease-fire starting noon local time following three days of the heaviest fighting in the disputed region since 1994, the Azeri defense ministry announced. Gapanli, a village south of Terter, has been one of the hardest hit. Houses bear the marks of the recent shelling; metal doors are riddled with shrapnel, power lines are cut down, craters are seen in the yards. (AP Photo/ Hicran Babayev)

An ‘unfrozen’ conflict in Nagorno-Karabakh

Recently, one of Vladimir Putin’s foreign policy functionaries made another outrageous statement on the status of the Azerbaijani region of Nagorno-Karabakh. Evgeniy Satanovsky, the head of Russian Institute of the Near East, visited the separatist region (in contravention of international law) in mid-June and declared: “As I understand it, the issue that Karabakh is part of Azerbaijan, in terms of military logic and from the standpoint of practical politics is completely closed.”

Safety of Chromium-6 Levels in North Carolina Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Exaggerating chromium risks

Constant claims, counterclaims and accusations about coal ash contaminating surface and underground water are making North Carolinians feel like they’re watching a fast-paced tennis match. Even people with chemistry degrees must feel bewildered by assertions that parts per million or billion of chromium-6 may cause cancer.

Growing the Movement with Hate Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Black Lives Matter’s hypocritical anti-Semitism

In its new platform, Black Lives Matter (BLM) has, despite the total lack of relevance to its own agenda or interests, thrown whatever heft it has behind the anti-Semitic movement to Boycott, Divest, and Sanction (BDS) Israel. In doing so, it is inarguably contributing to the campaign to “other” the world’s only Jewish state and, with it, the Jews themselves.

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (Associated Press)

Virginia’s McAuliffe is for losers

All the fuss about Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe trying to restore voting rights to felons who have served their sentences is just fuss, nothing more. To be sure, it appears at first glance that the chief executive of the Old Dominion is really concerned about civil rights for the downtrodden.

Terrorists Present in the U.S. Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

No plan to stop foreign-born terrorists

For decades, foreign-born Islamic terrorists have been exploiting our immigration system. Almost every type of immigration has been exploited by terrorists, from temporary legal immigration to illegal immigration to humanitarian immigration.

Overheated concern about July’s warmth

Mainstream media report that July was the “hottest” month since 1880 (or as CNN wrongly reported, “ever”). And future Julys will only become hotter.

Related Articles

#NeverTrump = #DefinitelyHillary

The #NeverTrump movement should look to history to guide its rhetoric and voting behavior. In the 2012 presidential election, between three and five million Republicans abstained from voting, and their absence contributed to President Obama's victory.

Slippery DOJ slope

Although the police in Ferguson, Missouri, did nothing wrong in the Michael Brown shooting, they have been investigated by the FBI and will submit to monitoring by our less-than-pure Department of Justice. The same will happen in Baltimore and very likely in Milwaukee.

The climate blame began in earnest last week with former Vice President Al Gore, who described the deluge as an example of "one of the manifestations of climate change." Those remarks were followed by a rash of supportive articles. (Associated Press)

Al Gore's sugar daddy

The optimist sees the glass half full, the pessimist sees the glass half empty. George Soros sees the glass as the property of someone else so he knocks it over. By knocking it over he spills some of the dark secrets of his so-called Open Society Foundation, revealing how his vast fortune promotes misfortune in America.

Only Trump helping

Wildfires in California have destroyed 96 homes and displaced 80,000 people. Flooding in Louisiana has damaged 40,000 homes and 86,000 people have already applied for federal disaster aid. Meanwhile the soon-to-be former president is vacationing in Martha's Vineyard, partying and playing round after round of golf.

Agents best bet for new plans

"Aetna deals latest blow to Obamacare, pulls out of most markets" reported that in 2017 Aetna, one of the nation's largest health insurers, will sell exchange plans in just four states, down from 15 states this year ("Aetna deals latest blow to Obamacare, pulls out of most markets," Web, Aug. 15).

In this photo taken on Aug. 18, 2016, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to media as she meets with law enforcement leaders at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Hillary and treason

In a remarkably shameless appearance Sunday, Clinton campaign manager Robby Mook told ABC News that "real questions are being raised" about whether Donald Trump "is just a puppet for the Kremlin in this race." Young Mr. Mook, like many of his generation ignorant of the history of his country, should be in serious trouble.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Wear and Tear: The Threads of My Life'

If there was a more dysfunctional marriage than the one between British critic and enfant terrible Kenneth Tynan and American writer Elaine Dundy, you wouldn't want to know about it, let alone be caught up in its maelstrom.

Yin and Yang Sun Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Causing less harm by doing nothing

It has not only been a waste of money, it has done real harm. Some trillions of hard-earned taxpayer dollars have been spent to combat global warming over the last three decades. Has the expenditure of all of this money reduced global temperatures from where they would have otherwise been? No, at least not to a measurable degree.

Russian President Vladimir Putin. **File (Alexei Nikolsky/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

Imperial dreams

Historically, the West has faced an existential threat from both the Persian and Russian empires. The Persian Empire was fueled by the expansionist dreams of Darius and Xerxes, foiled only by the heroism of the Greeks, led by men like Themistocles.

Mickey Mouse Photo ID Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

To ID or not to ID?

Every election cycle we must endure challenges and allegations about fraud (conservatives) and discrimination (liberals) when it comes to voter ID laws. This year is no different.

An American flag flies in front of a new courthouse annex, built with recovery funds from Hurricane Rita, which hit nearly ten years ago, in Cameron, La., Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2015. A decade after Hurricane Rita, Cameron Parish in coastal, southwest Louisiana still bears the scars of her wrath. Thursday, Sept. 24, 2015 is the anniversary of Hurricane Rita.  (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Checking the national 'dashboard'

You know those polls where they ask people if the country is heading in the right direction? One problem with that question is that it lacks context or detail. What makes us say yes or no? It's generally a gut reaction that often has little to do with any actual evidence.

Defining alcohol consumption down

With summer vacation drawing to a close, many parents are eager to pop a bottle of bubbly in celebration.

Gen. Jack Vessey Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A soldier's soldier

Until he died last week at 94, former Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. John W. Vessey Jr. was a living memorial to an earlier America -- where God and country were not seen as contradictions, where faith formed the bedrock of personal and national character.

A big slush fund for the Clinton Foundation

- The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton, after learning there is a chance that hackers could release potentially embarrassing Clinton Foundation emails before the November elections, has announced that if she is elected president the foundation will no longer accept the foreign and corporate donations that have convinced all but her most loyal sycophants that she may well have been peddling influence to the highest bidder as secretary of State