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Illustration on Iran's empty condemnation of terrorism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Iran’s empty condemnation of terrorism

About two days after an Orlando gunman carried out the worst mass shooting in U.S. history, the Iranian foreign ministry issued a statement purporting to decry the incident. Speaking via the state-run IRNA, a spokesperson said the Iranian regime “condemns” the attack “based on its principled policy of condemning terrorism and its strong will to seriously confront this evil phenomenon.”

Illustration on prospects for the post-EU British economy by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Britain’s economy, post-Brexit

This is no time to sell the United Kingdom short. Its economic and political institutions remain among the strongest in the world and should afford it considerable opportunity to negotiate new arrangements with the European Union.

Albanian Prime Minister Edi Rama, left, welcomes the Albanian national soccer squad arriving in Tirana after failing to qualify to the next round at the EURO 2016 European Championship, Thursday, June 23, 2016.(AP Photo/Hektor Pustina)

An albatross in Albania?

In what is increasingly reminiscent of a John Le Carre novel, it seems that with each passing month there is a new chapter in a seemingly unending series of revelations of political intrigue and drama that are overwhelming the Republic of Albania.

Illustration on the Brexit outcome's effects on uncontrolled migration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Rule Britannia

Whether you think the United Kingdom exiting the European Union is cause for alarm or celebration, you have to concede this: Britons engaged in an open, lively and mostly peaceful debate, they turned out in droves, they cast their votes freely and fairly and, by so doing, expressed their will and determined their future. That’s called democracy. Is there a preferable alternative?

Term Limits for Congress Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The common sense of term limits

As our first president, George Washington knew that everything he did set a pattern for those who would follow. He served two terms in office, then stepped down. He declined all efforts to get him to stay.

Illustration on a proposal to create boards of directors to oversee Executive branch departments by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A remedy for overregulation

If the 2016 presidential election has proved anything so far, it’s that millions of Americans know something is seriously wrong in Washington and they want it fixed. They’re right.

Jihad Magazines Collage by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The original jihadists

They wave a menacing black banner, behead American hostages in slickly produced videos, entice hardened jihadis and thrill-seeking wannabes alike to their ranks, bust a border to establish a state and claim provinces from West Africa to Southeast Asia.

Illustration on Joyful Noise's fundraising for the Sanders campaign by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Joyful Noise unites ‘citizens for Sanders’

Throughout this year’s presidential primary, Sen. Bernie Sanders made support for tougher campaign finance laws a cornerstone of his (now presumably concluding) campaign. His website railed against the “political campaign finance system” as “corrupt,” and “the disastrous Citizens United Supreme Court decision” as “hing[ing] on the absurd notion that money is speech, [and] corporations are people.”

Illustration on the need to identify radical Islamic's impact on homosexuality by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama’s duty after Orlando

Americans witnessed evil once again as a radical Islamic gunman — who pledged allegiance to the Islamic State’s caliph — recently killed or wounded 102 people while they were enjoying “Latin Night” in a popular gay night club in Orlando. It was the deadliest attack on the lesbian, bisexual, gay and transgender (LBGT) community in American history.

Brexit Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Brexit’s unsettling aftermath

The British independence referendum vote on June 23 was close and, surely we all will respect the will of the British people. The British prime minister, doing the honorable thing, resigned. Yet many British people are deeply ashamed of the result, owing to the barely unspoken rationale behind many votes: immigration (very un-British), and the likely consequences.

Chicken Little

Nobody does hysteria like the media

- The Washington Times

Chicken Little will have company when the sky falls on the British isles and the world ends, which the European Union, The New York Times, The Washington Post, the BBC, CBS, NBC, ABC and Barack Obama can now say with confidence will be at 2:20 in the morning next Thursday (just in time for the late final editions).

Illustration on U.S. job opportunities and economic stagnation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘Brexit’ strikes back at the elites

Last week, Britain voted to leave the European Union, freeing itself from international governance. Just as the United States would recoil at the thought of Canadians making laws that trump U.S. governance were that a provision of the North American Free Trade Agreement, Britain is evidently fed up with ceding its sovereignty to unelected bureaucrats in Brussels as part of its international agreements.

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Mr. Potato Head Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Fact checker fandango

I see that CNN is calling upon the good offices of Mr. Potato Head to refute Donald Trump's evisceration of Hillary Clinton in his speech last Wednesday. Mr. Potato Head is very indignant that Peter Schweizer has written a book, "Clinton Cash," demonstrating that a pattern of corruption exists in the relationship between the Clinton Foundation and the Clinton State Department.

Illustration on the Brexit vote by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Brexit's aftermath

For many people outside of Britain, the Brexit vote came in like a typical news item. One minute, you knew nothing about it (or almost nothing), then it was all over the news. And now you see people reacting with great passion over the result.

Illustration on the Brexit vote. (Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times)

What the British revolt signals

Oh what a difference a break makes. On Thursday, our English cousins across the pond voted to leave the European Union. For some reason, they had enough of unelected bureaucrats issuing rules and regulations ruining their lives and throwing the future in the dustbin.

'Plus' ruling racist

Now the highest court in the land says racism is perfectly OK in school admissions — so long as it's used for "positive" purposes ("Supreme Court upholds affirmative action 'plus' policy," Web, June 23). But if you use race to accept one person for a limited number of slots, you're automatically using race to reject another person, and that's not "positive" at all. In schools, only academic credentials should matter.

Media double standard

In 2008, presidential candidate Barack Obama booted reporters from three newspapers — The Washington Times, the New York Post and the Dallas Morning News — off his campaign plane. In their place, Mr. Obama seated journalists from Jet, Ebony and Glamour magazines. His campaign said the move was due to a limited number of plane seats. The mainstream press said nothing at all.

Sit-in not probem solver

For Rep. John Lewis, Georgia Democrat, gun control is a matter of debate, just as civil rights was in the 1960s. But is a sit-in on gun violence really what we need?

President Barack Obama pauses while speaking at a fundraiser for Washington Gov. Jay Inslee at the Washington State Convention Center, Friday, June 24, 2016, in Seattle, WA. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Obama's takes a licking

The week was not a good one for President Obama and his shriveling legacy. Mr. Obama, who promised to transform America into a country that he and Michele could be proud of, wanted to build the legacy by bringing in millions of illegal immigrants who, when transformed into voters, would insure a Democratic majority for as far as a patriot's eye could see.

Illustration on Chinese drugs coming through Mexico by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Drugs and thugs

On June 9, The New York Times ran this headline on Page A1: "Drug That Killed Prince Is Making Mexican Cartels Richer, U.S. Says." The first line of the story reads, "The drug that killed Prince has become a favorite of Mexican cartels because it is extremely potent, popular in the United States — and immensely profitable, American officials say."

BOOK REVIEW: 'Junkyards, Gearheads, and Rust: Salvaging the Automotive Past'

This unexpectedly interesting book is all about cars -- after they die and go to automotive purgatory to await the crusher. The author, an assistant professor of History at Auburn, who confesses to a lifelong passion for both cars and junkyards, is a man who never met a junkyard he didn't like.

The flag of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, top, and the flag of England fly above a souvenir stand on Westminster Bridge following yesterday's EU referendum result, London, Saturday, June 25, 2016. Britain voted to leave the European Union after a bitterly divisive referendum campaign. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)

The world turned upside down

The elites across the world had a dreadful weekend. Britain's historic goodbye to Europe -- and it was indeed historic -- reverberated in capitals on every continent. The elites, the people who run things (or think they do and who certainly think they should) were told, in language plain and unsparing: "You stink!"

Eco-Terrorism Damage Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Greenpeace under fire

Governments and courts around the world are finally cracking down on the eco-terrorist organization Greenpeace. The crackdown, which is long overdue, couldn't happen to a more misguided bunch of people.

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's economic plans by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary pleads for four more years

"People are working harder and longer just to keep their heads above water. And to deal with the costs, the everyday costs, the costs of basics like childcare and prescription drugs that are too high. College is getting more expensive every day. And wages are still too low and inequality is too great. Good jobs in this country are still too hard to come by."

Illustration on affirmative action in universities by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Quotas by any other name

Reverse discrimination is alive and well in the United States, judging by what transpired at the Supreme Court last Thursday and a bill that recently passed New York's state assembly.

FILE - In this May 6, 2016 file photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a rally in Eugene, Ore. The city of Eugene plans to bill the Donald Trump campaign nearly $100,000 to pay for costs associated with last month's visit. Police Chief Pete Kerns said in an email Wednesday, June 22, 2016, that overtime compensation for police officers totaled $78,000 while firefighters and other city employees racked up another $10,000 in OT. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)

There's hope for the 'unknown'

Donald Rumsfeld, the former secretary of Defense, has given the Republicans a fighting slogan to appeal to voters who can't quite cotton to Donald Trump but who sure can't vote for Hillary Clinton. Mr. Rumsfeld says he's voting for the Donald because he's more comfortable with a "known unknown" than with a "known known."