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Illustration on the need for Arab states to deal with Islamist terror by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A harsh message worth sending

Just when everyone here was deep in preoccupation with partisan fantasy over whether Donald Trump should be impeached or removed by the 25th Amendment, the president changed the subject. Presidents can do that.

Illustration on Saudia Arabian duplicity by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Saudi Arabia’s duplicity

Trusting Saudi Arabia to combat terrorists and extremists and “drive them out,” as President Trump called on the kingdom and other Arab and Muslim nations to do in his Riyadh speech, is akin to forging an alliance with the Ku Klux Klan to combat racism and anti-Semitism.

Protesters from labor and other progressive groups fill the rotunda of the state Capitol in St. Paul, Minn., on Wednesday, May 24, 2017, to demand that Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton veto the bills that passed before the Minnesota Legislature's special session bogged down earlier in the day. (AP Photo/Steve Karnowski)

The dirty secret behind big labor’s decline

- The Washington Times

My father was a toolmaker and union organizer who, for many years, headed the Rockford, Ill. Labor Council while my mother was serving five terms as head of the Women’s Auxiliary of the United Auto Workers. Dad worked as a machinist and my mother as a waitress and clerk in a local jewelry store until my dad retired and joined a couple of buddies to buy a bar.

Cutting Taxes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A rare chance to boost small businesses

Among the many lessons our current leadership should learn from Ronald Reagan’s effective governance are his initiatives to revitalize the American economy. Most relevant today is remembering President Reagan’s tax cuts and corporate tax reform of 1986 enacted with bipartisan support that produced sustained economic growth.

FILE - In this Saturday, May 20, 2017 file photo, President Donald Trump holds a sword and sways with traditional dancers during a welcome ceremony at Murabba Palace, in Riyadh. Trump and his entourage were treated to a traditional all-male Saudi sword dance. Standing shoulder-to-shoulder with the Saudi king, Trump swayed side to side and briefly joined the groove. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Trump’s vision for the Middle East

President Trump arrived in the Arabian desert hoping to realign the politics of the Middle East in the aftermath of a failed Obama policy. For eight years, President Obama tilted in the direction of Iran, believing that the influence of the Shia could balance Sunni dominance.

Illustration on biometric screening security measures by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Integrating biometrics into visitor screening

The horrible attack in Manchester, coupled with the recent release of the Department of Homeland Security’s Visa Overstay Report, should again force us to ask the question, are we doing everything we can to properly vet those seeking to come to the United States?

The Media Research Center has cited some of the worst "impeachment" talk featured on broadcast and cable networks. (Media Research Center image)

Inside the Beltway: Gauging the worst of the ‘impeachment’ chatter

- The Washington Times

The liberal news media’s unprecedented outcry against President Trump continues, and it constantly mutates. Whether Americans pay attention to all this chatter remains to be seen. Some of the remarks are worse than others, however. Geoffrey Dickens, deputy research director for the Media Research Center, pored over news footage from the last three weeks to determine the best of the worst of the commentary. Or maybe that should be the worst of the worst.

People cry after a vigil in Albert Square, Manchester, England, Tuesday May 23, 2017, the day after the suicide attack at an Ariana Grande concert that left 22 people dead as it ended on Monday night. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

Another lesson from Manchester

After the horrific carnage unleashed by the terrorist attack in Manchester, England, some of the reactions were inexplicable. We’re used to jihadis celebrating the horror of mass murder, but it’s still perplexing to hear Western leaders and media reissue their bizarre insistence that we need to get used to the sick and depraved.

Illustration of Roger Ailes    The Washington Times

Roger Ailes’ exit, stage right

A major threat to the predominance of the Kultursmog in these United States passed away last week, but he had succeeded in what he set out to do, namely: to damage the left in America beyond any hope of recovery. Not many people recognize this, but it is nonetheless true.

Illustration on Turkish security attacks on American protesters in Washington, DC by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When armed thugs come to town

Two times in two years, Turkish President Reycep Tayyip Erdogan visited our nation’s capital, and two times in two years his armed thugs attacked peaceful people on our streets. This time, his people sent nine Americans to the hospital.

Illustration on the benefits of biofuel by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Cultivating homegrown energy solutions

With all the publicity around fracking, it’s easy to assume that America’s own domestic oil production is more than enough to fuel a growing economy. It certainly helps. But there’s no magic bullet that will ensure long-term American energy security.

Go player Ke Jie, center, speaks at a press conference after playing a match against Google's artificial intelligence program, AlphaGo, during the Future of Go Summit in Wuzhen in eastern China's Zhejiang Province, Tuesday, May 23, 2017. Ke Jie, the world's top-ranked Go player, started a three-round showdown on Tuesday against AlphaGo, which beat a South Korean Go master in a five-round showdown last year. (AP Photo/Peng Peng)

The great crawl of China

The world has watched with amazement as China sprints toward its goal of becoming an advanced economy. Average annual gross domestic product (GDP) growth of 10 percent over the last 20 years has raised hundreds of millions of its citizens out of poverty and transformed China into an economic powerhouse.

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Illustration on the notion of government subsidy of nuclear power by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why nuclear power subsidies must end

Should utility bills and taxes be used to subsidize money-losing nuclear power plants so they can compete with renewable energy and low-cost natural gas?

Un-Happy Meal From High Minimum Wage Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How a CEO misapprehends the minimum wage

Last week, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg made headlines for her Mother's Day post calling for a minimum wage increase. "It's long past time," she claimed, "to raise the federal minimum wage."

Chart to accompany Rahn article of May 23, 2017

Population death spiral

It is hard to succeed if everyone is leaving. Some of the former communist countries are suffering from a population death spiral, with double-digit population declines over the last 25 years, as can be seen in the enclosed table.

Even the Walls have Ears Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A conversation with Condoleezza Rice

On Wednesday, I sat down with former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice to discuss her new book, "Democracy: Stories From the Long Road to Freedom." The following transcript has been edited for length and clarity.

In this May 18, 1971 file photo, political consultant Roger Ailes, who died last week, is shown in his office in New York. From communications guru and TV producer to Chairman-CEO of Fox News Channel, Ailes' used a "fair and balanced" branding approach, targeted at viewers who believed other cable-news networks, and maybe even the media overall, displayed a liberal tilt from which Fox News delivered them with "unvarnished truth." Associated Press photo

The genius of Roger Ailes

Roger Ailes was no genius, not in the league of Stephen Hawking and Albert Einstein. The founding chairman of Fox News Channel, who died last week from complications after suffering a fall, understood and respected Middle America from whence he came.

President Trump. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A boffo performance on the road

- The Washington Times

The Donald finally catches a break. His trip to the Middle East was planned weeks ago, long before the sacking of James Comey and the media transformation of the voluble sackee from goat to hero. The opportunity to get out of Dodge arrived just in time.

Anti-Jewish sentiment unwelcome

I was stunned to read an apparent ad (not so identified) by A.H. Krieg, titled "Another French Fiasco," in your national weekly edition on May 15. I will not lend credence to this outrageous rant by quoting its incessant and unsupported insults to Jews. I read "Mein Kampf" when I studied German history at Yale many years ago, and this ad was a similar excuse for reasoned, intelligent writing that should never have gotten by any of your editors.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton leaves Paris-Yates Chapel at the University of Mississippi after speaking at a memorial service for Carolyn Ellis Staton, on Monday, May 22, 2017, in Oxford, Miss. (Bruce Newman/The Oxford Eagle via AP)

No sauce for the gander

"Do As I Say (Not As I Do)" carries the strength of religious doctrine in Washington, where the U.S. government and all its minions are dedicated to instructing everyone in flyover country in how to live their lives — or else. Someone could write a book. In fact, Peter Schweizer has. His book became a bestseller and even a movie.

President Donald Trump speaks during a joint statement with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Monday, May 22, 2017, in Jerusalem. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump's no-apology tour

Donald Trump is the un-Obama. His predecessor set the tone for his presidency by making stops in the Middle East with head bowed in contrition for any and all offenses the United States had made, might have made, or could have made. The enemies of America were invited to fill in the blank. Barack Obama, mistaking humiliation for humility, promised to "lead from behind."

Who's the real criminal?

I would be remiss in doing my civic duty if I kept my mouth shut when I saw a terrible injustice. The Democrats have defamed, assaulted and slandered President Trump unmercifully since he took office.

(Naples Herald)

The man who killed bin Laden speaks

On May 2, 2011, Osama bin Laden, founder and leader of the terrorist organization al Qaeda, the man responsible for the horrific Sept. 11, 2001 attacks on the Pentagon and the World Trade Center, and the most wanted terrorist in the world, was shot dead by American special operators during a raid on his compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan.

Seth Conrad Rich, a DNC staffer, was killed in July near his home in the District of Columbia. (Image via Rich's LinkedIn profile.)

The strange case of Seth Rich

- The Washington Times

This is the unfortunate story of the killing of a young man named Seth Conrad Rich, a Nebraska-born and -reared young man whose death by two gunshots has resulted in conspiracy theories of the worst kind.

President Donald Trump delivers a speech to the Arab Islamic American Summit, at the King Abdulaziz Conference Center, Sunday, May 21, 2017, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. From left, White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus, Ivanka Trump, White House senior adviser Jared Kushner. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Iran laughably rips Trump for spreading 'Iranophobia'

- The Washington Times

Iran, reacting to President Donald Trump's speech at the Arab Islamic American Summit in Riyadh, called out the commander-in-chief for his blunt rhetoric and accused him of harming Tehran's reputation in the Middle East. Consider this your Monday morning laugh. You're welcome.

Notre Dame graduates walk out of Notre Dame Stadium in protest as Vice President Mike Pence speaks at the 2017 commencement ceremony Sunday, May 21, 2017, in South Bend, Ind. (Robert Franklin/South Bend Tribune via AP)

Notre Dame snowflakes exit, stage right, for Mike Pence

- The Washington Times

Vice President Mike Pence's graduation ceremony speech at Notre Dame caused quite a few students -- offended students, apparently -- to exit, stage right, and leave the event. America, meet the graduating class of 2017 -- too weak to listen to countering views.

Higher Temperature Readings Equal More Money Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Degrading Earth's future climate

Best practice in science is achieved through a minimum of two critical conditions: humility and perspective. If humility and perspective are ignored, science suffers.

Product of Venezuela Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Cry for me, Venezuela

I often say only half-jokingly to students on college campuses who are all in with Bernie Sanders that if they think socialism is such a wonderful economic model: how about a one-way ticket to Caracas?