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Illustration on Taiwan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

China, Taiwan and an important anniversary

This year Beijing will stand in solidarity with Taiwan and commemorate the 70th anniversary of the “228 Massacre.” On Feb. 28, 1947 Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek’s Kuomintang (KMT) security forces stopped Lin Jiang-mai, a Taiwanese widow, for illegal cigarette sales. The KMT officers confiscated Mrs. Lin’s cash and wares. They struck her on the head repeatedly for resisting.

Healthcare Industry Dependence on Obamacare Finances Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When hospitals resist change

Most Republican health care proposals include Health Savings Accounts (HSAs). People like them because they reward healthy lifestyle choices and careful, cost-conscious use of health care resources. When we are advised we need to get a MRI, we ask “when?” and “where?” but hardly ever, “what does it cost?”

Chart to acompany Moore article of Feb. 27, 2017

Pleading poverty, demanding new taxes

Stop me if you’ve heard this story before. Governors and state legislators are pleading poverty again and they are demanding tax hikes of every imaginable kind. More than half the states are facing big deficits this year and they are mostly blue states like California, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois and New York and Oregon. (See chart.) These are the highest tax states with some of the deepest pools of red ink. There’s got to be a message here.

Illustration on trump's international policy attitude by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Trump Doctrine

The United States needs a grand strategy to guide its foreign policy. The Trump Doctrine should announce boldly that America is back in the world leadership business and that it stands resolutely for peace. America should call out countries that threaten world peace and form military alliances with their neighbors to confront them.

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting on domestic and international human trafficking, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. With Trump are Michelle DeLaune, center, National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, and Dina Powell, right, White House Senior Counselor for Economic Initiatives. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Trumpspeak, a language rich in adjectives

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump isn’t the carrier of the disease that threatens the language, but he suffers with enthusiasm. His abuse of the adjective might eventually threaten his foreign policy.

Illustration on immigration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘I am an immigrant’

I have a Masters in International Relations, speak four languages and served as a politician in my country, the Republic of Georgia. I am also an immigrant.

Playing the xenophobic card

- The Washington Times

Last week, The New York Times detailed President Donald Trump’s press conference, and wrote: “A Jewish reporter got to ask Trump a question, it didn’t go well.”

The Genesis of Despicable Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Being a ‘deplorable’

Who among us can’t at some point relate to what it feels like to be an “irredeemable deplorable,” a term coined in the heat of a campaign but with far greater implications now. Whether we are religious or not, whether we pray or not, whether we are political activists or not, many of us know what it feels like to be mocked to the point of less than “other” status.

Illustration of Ajit Pai by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A new champion for internet choice

One of President Trump’s less publicized appointments also happens to be one of his best: Ajit Pai as the new chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is a cause for celebration.

Illustration on the 9th Circuit court by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Reining in a hysterical judiciary

On Feb. 9, a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit issued a ruling upholding the temporary restraining order against enforcement of President Trump’s Executive Order 13769.

Illustration on the complexities of dealing with illegal immigration by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The labyrinth of illegal immigration

Activists portray illegal immigration solely as a human story of the desperately poor from south of the border fleeing misery to start new, productive lives in the United States — despite exploitation and America’s nativist immigration laws.

Black Leadership Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Enlightened, inspired black leadership

After having been assigned to the United States Military Academy at West Point, one becomes acutely aware of the critical role leadership plays in solving challenging social problems. As an African-American, with that experience, I cannot not but consider the role black leadership plays in addressing African-American issues.

Illustration on domestic spying by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

The spooks have come home to roost

Last week, The Wall Street Journal revealed that members of the intelligence community — part of the deep state, the unseen government within the government that does not change with elections — now have acquired so much data on everyone in America that they can selectively reveal it to reward their friends and harm their foes. Their principal foe today is the president of the United States.

Related Articles

FILE - In this Feb. 15, 2017 file photo, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington before the House Financial Services Committee for the Fed's semi-annual Monetary Policy Report to Congress.  Federal Reserve officials earlier this month discussed the need to raise a key interest rate again "fairly soon," especially if the economy remains strong. Minutes of the discussions in minutes released Wednesday, Feb. 22  showed that while Fed officials decided to keep a key rate unchanged at their Jan. 31-Feb. 1 meeting, there was growing concern about what could happen to inflation if the economy out-performed expectations. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The regulator cometh, and maybe goeth

There's a lot to be said about government regulation -- and much of it not good. Some regulation, given that human nature is what it is, is necessary. But sometimes it seems there's little difference between the government telling you how to spend your money and the government just taking it. Regulations are a lot like taxes.

President Donald Trump walks with Housing and Urban Development Secretary-designate Dr. Ben Carson, as they pass a exhibit honoring Carson during a tour of the National Museum of African American History and Culture, Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The Trump-Reagan parallels

The media laugh at any attempt to compare President Trump with former President Ronald Reagan, but there are many similarities, not the least of which are the withering attacks both men endured while running for and as president.

Looking back at who Obama could have been

In the great swirl of people and ideas and the high winds of political rhetoric and journalistic overkill howling through Washington during the early days of the Trump administration, it's hard to remember just what preceded it all -- an extended period of not much presided over by a somewhat detached figure with an academic sense of irony who did no irreparable damage, presided over no catastrophes, quietly turned over the keys to the White House when the moment arrived, and just as quietly, seemed almost to fade away.

Illustration on the realities confronting Saudi Arabia's "industrial revolution" by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The kingdom, the power and the oil

Saudi Arabia is changing. When government officials here tell you that, you take it with an oversized grain of salt. But when Saudi human rights activists say the same, you pay attention.

Attack on the Earth by the Evil Empire Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Time's misreading of science

As demonstrated by the confirmation hearings of Scott Pruitt for new Environmental Protection Agency chief, all-out war is being waged against the Trump administration by leftists who believe science is under attack from the evil empire.

Illustration on President Obama's comparative literary stature by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama compares himself to Abraham Lincoln, but 44 and grammar do not agree

Did you know this? "Not since Lincoln has there been a president as fundamentally shaped -- in his life, convictions and outlook on the world -- by reading and writing as Barack Obama." Frankly, I did not know President Obama was so wedded to books and the printed word as to be compared to Abraham Lincoln, author of the Gettysburg Address, magisterial Second Inaugural, and devotee of Shakespeare.

Annette Smith     The Washington Times

Vermont's unsung hero

After years of battling the powers that be in relative anonymity, in January the Burlington Free Press named Annette Smith "Vermonter of the Year." That's a much kinder title than some others have applied.

President Donald Trump, right, speaks as Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, left, listens at Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Fla., Monday, Feb. 20, 2017, where Trump announced that McMaster will be the new national security adviser. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

The downside of a Trump tariff

When word got out in January 1848 that gold had been discovered at Sutter's Mill in Coloma, California, near Sacramento, it triggered the famous California Gold Rush, which in a few short years brought some 300,000 fortune seekers to the territory, whose population at the time was just 155,000, most of them Native Americans.

Maple tree sap drips from a tap into a bucket, Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017, in Brookline, N.H. Sen. Maggie Hassan, D-NH, led a discussion with maple syrup producers in New Hampshire about how climate change is impacting their industry. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

Carbonated politics

Every problem in Washington finally finds a solution, and it's usually called a tax. A group of policy mavens, eager to do something for everybody, proposes to tax carbon, the substance found in all forms of fossil fuels. It's the fourth-most abundant element in the universe. The idea is that if there's a levy on the carbon content of oil, coal and natural gas, consumers will use less of it. Presto! No more human-caused global warming. But it still smells like a tax.

Stranded vehicles stand loaded with goods after the Jammu-Srinagar highway remained closed, at Jammu, India, Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017. The Jammu-Srinagar national highway remained closed for vehicular traffic for the second day Tuesday following landslides triggered by rains, officials said. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)

Unhappy motoring ahead

After years of slow but steady decline, traffic fatalities on the nation's highways and byways are increasing again. If the death and injury toll continues to rise in the years ahead, it's likely the fault of government supervision gone awry.

Professor should apologize

A college student who recorded a professor making anti-Trump comments allegedly violated a policy that "prohibits the recording of someone on district property without that person's knowledge or consent" ("Caleb O'Neil, Orange Coast College student, suspended for recording professor's anti-Trump rant," Web, Feb. 15). What is the college's policy on a professor teaching hatred and vitriol about the president of the United States to students whose parents probably pay an enormous amount for their offspring to learn something of value, not to hear disparaging words about the leader of the free world?

Stop 'death by decree'

Congress can stop the "death by decree" simply by writing regulation into statute ("Congress must stop death by decree," Web, Feb. 19). Members and staff who draft legislation can concurrently envision how they want the law carried out and put those ideas (including a cost cap) into the proposed statute, thus leaving no ambiguity or discretion to the executive branch.

President Donald Trump, center, speaks while seated with Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, left, and retired Army Lt. Gen. Keith Kellogg, right, at Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Fla., Monday, Feb. 20, 2017, where Trump announced that McMaster will be the new national security adviser.  Kellogg, who had been his acting adviser, will now serve as the National Security Council chief of staff.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Another blow to the #NeverTrumpers

- The Washington Times

The Never Trump crowd has an unwavering belief that Donald Trump is unhinged, unfit for the presidency -- an irrational actor who is dangerous on the world stage. Yet he continues to make good, reasonable and rational decisions.