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The land of the cheerful giver

The Lord loveth a cheerful giver, as the Apostle Paul tells us, and some of the most generous givers are the most cheerful among the faithful, and they live among us in America.

Scimitar canary illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Islamic jihad comes to campus

The world is witnessing a resurgence of global anti-Semitism not seen since the 1930s and the “Final Solution.” In the Middle East, Hitler-admiring regimes like Iran, and Hitler-admiring parties like Hezbollah, Hamas and the Muslim Brotherhood, are openly planning to finish the job the Nazis started. Even in America, until now the most hospitable place outside of Israel for Jews, the atmosphere is more hostile than at any time in the last 70 years.

Illustration on the history of successful presidents passing a "third term" to their political successors by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The odds against a presidential three-peat

Republicans looking ahead to 2016 take heart: History is on your side. For more than a century, only twice has a party held the White House for at least three consecutive presidential elections. Both times, it took each party’s greatest president of this period — Franklin Roosevelt and Ronald Reagan — to accomplished the feat. That fact should be a major concern to Democrats, who will be seeking their party’s third consecutive term on President Obama’s record.

Union attempts to organize fast food illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The $50 million question

Facing what appears to be terminal decline, the Service Employees International Union has taken to a desperate Hail Mary play to keep their bank accounts well-funded. This week SEIU and its “worker center” front groups, led by Berlin Rosen — a political consultancy with ties to New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and other left-wing groups — staged various media stunts claiming to be “strikes” against fast food restaurants for higher wages.

Protecting the U.S. electrical grid illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Putting America in the dark

The recent temporary blackout in Washington that afflicted the White House, the Congress and interrupted a State Department press conference rightly provoked a spate of media commentary about the vulnerability of the electric grid to terrorist attack. The blackout reportedly was caused by a small explosion resulting from a malfunction in a transformer substation.

Illustration on the packaging of Hillary Clinton's candidacy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The selling of the new Hillary

Joe McGinnis, a young writer who got access to the advertising agency with the Nixon account in 1968, changed the way we thought about electing presidents with his best-seller, “The Selling of the President.”

Illustration on restoring the American dream by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The exceptional thing the successful GOP candidate must say

The successful Republican candidate for president will have to be many things: fearless fighter, relentless advocate for conservative principles, articulate spokesperson for the forgotten middle class, a likable charismatic personality, expert on the complicated dynamics of foreign policy and national security strategy.

Ethnicity mask illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The transracial nation

Not long ago, The New York Times uncovered the artifact that Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush had once listed himself as “Hispanic” on a Florida voter registration form.

Illustration on Obama's killing of Americans without due process by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Can the president kill Americans?

Can the president kill you? The short answer is: yes, but not legally. Yet, President Obama has established a secret process that involves officials from the departments of Justice and Defense, the CIA, and the White House senior staff whereby candidates are proposed for execution, and the collective wisdom of the officials then recommends execution to the president, who then accepts or rejects the recommendation.

Republicans breaking campaign promises illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The wimpy GOP Congress

Last November, Americans sent a stern message to President Obama and the Democrats when they delivered Congress to the Republicans. That’s because Republicans made a lot of promises to them in the last election. Those commitments were instrumental to their victory; they were actions Americans were demanding and Republicans were vowing to deliver.

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The little princess who could

Some people deserve to be remembered not because of any towering achievement, but simply because they did their best, sometimes rather clumsily, to make a positive contribution. Sophia Duleep Singh, daughter of the last maharajah of the Punjab, was such a person and Anita Anand's groundbreaking biography, thoroughly researched and written with considerable verve, does her subject full justice — and then some.

Say no to 'Big Sister' Clinton

Maybe it's just the conservative in me, but when I heard Hillary Rodham Clinton say that "Everyday Americans need a champion, and I want to be that champion so you can do more than just get by — you can get ahead and stay ahead," my first thought was "Big government" ("Hillary Clinton announces 2016 bid, says she's running for 'everyday Americans,' April 12).

What about Krajina Serbs?

It's all very well for Pope Francis to recognize the Ottoman genocide of Armenians, but what about Pius XII's silence regarding events across the Adriatic in wartime greater Croatia ("Pope recalls slaughter of Armenians in 'first genocide of the 20th century,'" Web, April 12)? Hundreds of thousands of civilian Serbs in Croatia and Bosnia were slaughtered by the Croatian Ustasha regime. Their only political ambition was to lie low given that Serbia proper was under brutal German occupation and their only crime was their national and religious identity.

Stop Hillary campaign image from the Republican National Committee

Stop Hillary marketing victory: GOP generates $9.9 million in buzzworthy 'earned TV media'

- The Washington Times

There's a petition, a video, a flash drive and some nimble talking points - the Republican National Committee was quick to launch a well organized and imaginative effort to counter Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign. And it has paid off. "In three days, the RNC accumulated an impressive $9.9 million in earned TV media and 1,675 individual hits across TV and radio," Sean Spicer.

Inhaler Saves Environmental Agenda Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Rebranding the EPA’s clean air agenda

On Thursday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia will hear an important case, Murray Energy v. EPA, regarding what used to be the Environmental Protection Agency's global warming agenda. At issue are sweeping rules that amount to rewriting the Clean Air Act, an effort made necessary when Congress, via the proper democratic process, rejected turning that act into a global warming law for rationing our most abundant sources of energy.

Fading American history

The American people and boards of trustees must demand that students graduate college with knowledge of our past.

U.S. Army Pfc. Amy Alexanders carries a 103-pound barrel to a Bradley Fighting Vehicle during a physical demands study, Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2014, in Ft. Stewart, Ga. The Army is conducting a study that will determine how all soldiers,  including women, for the first time, will be deemed fit to join its fighting units from infantry platoons to tank crews. (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)

Women at war, and the enemy is us

- The Washington Times

There's so much to worry about that a conscientious citizen has to get up early to put in the 10 or 12 hours every day to cover it all — Hillary, the shortage of gay wedding cakes, the scarcity of gay pizza in Indiana, the deficiency of fresh-cut flowers for male brides in California, the horned devils who don't get no respect at the Iran-nuclear weapons talks in Switzerland. Now we have to worry about an excess of push-ups and pull-ups at Marine Corps training bases.

Abolish the IRS

Abolish the Internal Revenue Service? IRS Commissioner John Koskinen has said the government must have an IRS to collect the taxes to fund the government. Mr. Koskinen is right that no matter what kind of tax system we have, there needs to be a tax collection bureau. But those in favor of abolishing the present IRS are correct in that the United States certainly can get along perfectly well without the politicized, abusive and rights-trampling tax agency the IRS has become.

Hillary Rodham Clinton has attempted to allay the furor over her exclusive use of a private email account hosted on a private server in her home for conducting official business as secretary of state, a practice that may have violated federal open records laws. (Associated Press)

Hillary to the rescue

Hillary Rodham Clinton is not the inevitable president, but she was clearly the inevitable candidate. For the party, she's what's available, and she's a meal ticket for the clutch of retreads, has-beens and hangers-on from a checkered past, and now she wants to be the 67-year-old leader of a youth movement in a Democratic Party reeling and disillusioned in the wake of suffering blowouts in consecutive congressional elections. Her appeal, such as it is, is an unusual one: "I ain't much, but I'm all you've got."

The 'new' Hillary Clinton

In the video announcing her presidential candidacy, Hillary Clinton says the economic deck "is still stacked in favor of those at the top."

Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei took issues with key points on the framework of a nuclear deal including sanction relief and inspector access. (Associated Press)

Devilish nuclear details

The devil is often in the details of a deal, but the devil lies in the West's negotiators themselves as they attempt to make a deal with Iran. We have the word of Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, supreme leader of Iran, on that. He launched such a fusillade of verbal rockets against the Obama administration that the newly signed "framework" for a deal is scorched and blackened. If there was doubt that Iran would act in good faith in talks to shut down its nuclear weapons program, there is none now.

Still a 'community organizer' at heart

We elected President Obama as a statesman and leader. We didn't expect him to be a psychoanalyst and a mock priest. But on April 5 he told Thomas Friedman of The New York Times, "I think the biggest threats that they face may not be coming from Iran invading ... . It's going to be from dissatisfaction inside their own countries." So maniacs are driving themselves to decapitations and crucifixions?

Illustration on steps that can be taken to constrain Iran's quest for nuclear weapons by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The means of coercing Iran

How would the prospects for stability in the Middle East be affected if Iran were to succeed in its effort to become a nuclear power? In what ways might we expect Iran to behave differently?

Base Russia policy on current reality

I read with interest the piece reminiscing over the meeting of American and Soviet forces on the Elbe in 1945 ("When Americans and Soviets were comrades-in-arms," Web, April 2). Instead of looking at that meeting of our forces as a discrete, static event, some historical context may be useful. Perhaps if the Soviets had not invaded Poland with Germany and proceeded to provide material support to the Nazi war machine, assisting Hitler in avoiding the British naval blockade, such a historic meeting may never have been necessary.

ACLU attacks on religious groups illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Battering religious freedom with abortion

In its latest attack on religious liberty, the American Civil Liberties Union, wants to force Roman Catholic organizations to provide contraception and abortions to unaccompanied immigrant children pouring over America's southern border.

Illustration on the California drought and its causes by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A drought of common sense

Gov. Jerry Brown's recent proclamation that Californians must cut water usage by 25 percent certainly caught the attention of Californians and pundits nationwide. Featuring threats of fines of up to $500 per day, and even restrictions on personal shower habits, Mr. Brown wasted little time getting right to class warfare over our green lawns. Unfortunately, he and the ruling Democratic Party once again took a pass and resorted to draconian rationing measures and heavy-handed fees, while offering no leadership and no real solutions to California's current water crisis.

Chart to accompany Moore article 04-13-2014

The redistribution racket

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren appeared on one of the late night talk shows last week, beating the class warfare drum and arguing for billions of dollars in new social programs paid for with higher taxes on millionaires and billionaires. In recent years, though, blue states such as California, Illinois, Delaware, Connecticut, Hawaii, Maryland and Minnesota adopted this very strategy, and they raised taxes on their wealthy residents. How did it work out? Almost all of these states lag behind the national average in growth of jobs and incomes.

This March 13, 2012 photo shows older and newly constructed 250,000 barrel capacity oil storage tanks at the SemCrude tank farm north of Cushing, Okla. (AP Photo/Tulsa World, Michael Wyke) KOTV OUT; KJRH OUT; KTUL OUT; KOKI OUT; KQCW OUT; KDOR OUT; TULSA OUT; TULSA ONLINE OUT

An oily blast from the past

Predictions of gloom and doom have been with us since before steam replaced sail on the high seas, putting thousands of galley slaves out of work. Panic has driven modern man, even in our own times, to extreme and unworkable solutions to problems manufactured in the heat of fright and alarm.