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Supporters gather for a rally to protest the removal of Confederate flags from the Confederate Memorial Saturday, June 27, 2015, in Montgomery, Ala.   (Julie Bennett/AL.com via AP) MAGS OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT

The Civil War that never ends

- The Washington Times

Breaking news from 1865: There’s a war on between the North and the South. This time it’s barely more civil than last time, though we aren’t shooting at each other. Yet.

Illustration on providing more support for loved ones caring for wounded veterans by Alexander Hunter/ The Washington Times

A call to share the care

As America continues to strengthen the care we provide to those who have gone to war on behalf of our nation, we must recognize that for too long we have overlooked the most valuable individuals entrusted with the well-being of our wounded, ill and injured veterans. Nearly five-and-a-half million spouses, parents, children and other loved ones have voluntarily put their lives on hold to provide our returning service members with a trusted continuum of care that could not be replicated without them. Many of them will provide this care for years, if not decades to come.

Illustration on providing more support for loved ones caring for wounded veterans by Alexander Hunter/ The Washington Times

A call to share the care

America appreciates, honors and praises veterans who serve our country. But standing out of the ceremonial limelight, and always close by, are the millions of loved ones who care for those veterans. Our service members have returned home with disabling illnesses and injuries that often alter their lives — and the lives of their loved ones — forever. I am one of the 5.5 million military caregivers who witness and endure the long-term consequences of war in a way that many Americans will never experience.

Bankruptcy is the only way Greece can fashion a new beginning

Almost every option facing debt-drenched Greece is bad, but there is only one that will end this Greek tragedy for good. Let Greece go bankrupt. Then let this once-rich nation, hit the restart button to rebuild its economy.

U.S. President Ronald Reagan gestures as Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev looks on after their third session of talks at the Hofdi in Reykjavik, Oct. 12, 1986. (AP Photo/Ron Edmonds)

Obama’s Reykjavik moment

The choice for the president on the Iran nuclear talks is clear: walk away with dignity or appease and submit in disgrace.

Obama’s Clean Power Plan could push millions of minority Americans into poverty

This summer the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will finalize its carbon-dioxide emission regulations under President Obama’s Clean Power Plan. The EPA’s own data projects the regulations will reduce global carbon by less than 1 percent and sea level rise by one one-hundredth of an inch. The price Americans will pay for these “benefits” is layoffs and increased energy rates. Yet for the nation’s most vulnerable, the impacts will be far worse, pushing millions into poverty.

‘Death with dignity’ is often coerced by those with financial interests

Earlier this year, legislation was introduced to the D.C. Council that would legalize physician-assisted suicide in our nation’s capital for an adult patient diagnosed with a terminal condition and less than six months to live. Although this initiative has been introduced in 24 states this year (not passing in any so far), its passage in the District of Columbia this year risks setting a dangerous precedent for the rest of the nation.

(Photo courtesy of The White House)

The surging truth-tellers of the GOP

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump is surging in New Hampshire, and Chris Christie’s back on the hunt, sounding like a born-again contender. They’re both long shots — the Donald is off the board — but they’re making the kind of noise the wiseheads say they can’t make.

Members of left wing parties hold placards reading in Greek ''NO'' next to a Presidential Guard, Evzonas, during a protest outside the Greek Parliament in Athens, Sunday, June 28, 2015. Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras says the Bank of Greece has recommended that banks remain closed and restrictions be imposed on transactions, after the European Central Bank didn't increase the amount of emergency liquidity the lenders can access from the central bank. (AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza)

The Greeks should vote “no!”

Voting “no” offers Greeks some prospects for better solutions, whereas voting “yes” guarantees penury.

Illustration on the uncontrolled growth of Federal banking regulation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The squeeze of regulatory kudzu

It is called the vine that ate the South. Kudzu was first introduced at the 1876 Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia as an ornamental plant for home gardens. It pretty much stayed that way for half a century, until the federal government got involved. The Roosevelt administration decided that kudzu would be helpful against soil erosion and made it a mission of the Soil Erosion Service to plant kudzu all across the South. Now kudzu covers 12,000 square miles. Kudzu is estimated to smother another 150,000 acres each year.

Energy Independence Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A declaration of energy independence

The United States is closer than ever before to fulfilling the vision of our Founding Fathers. By achieving energy independence, we can achieve freedom from foreign influence.

Fireworks Warning Label Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The sticky legalisms of wacky warning labels

Not too long ago, common sense ruled the day, so called because it was shared by nearly everybody. Common values, commonly understood sense of right and wrong, just and unjust, all expressed in a common language of fairness.

Related Articles

Congress ignores PBS, NPR slant

The Washington Times' editorial "Snark and bias alert" (Web, June 28) observes "government-supported radio and television has grown fat and comfortable, paying enormous salaries to executives and administrators. The warp in the presentation of the news has grown steadily more evident. If they continue to take government money, PBS and NPR should submit to monitoring by an independent and effective monitoring panel, as David Cameron has prescribed for the BBC."

Reverse dangerous defense policy

Congress and President Obama should focus on defending against possible nuclear-missile attacks by expanding and upgrading our Ground-based Midcourse Defense Missile System (GMD). It is our best homeland defense against missile strikes and has proved reliable in many tests and experiments.

Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who has dominated the political scene for more than a dozen years, campaigned on behalf of his former party, the Islamist-rooted Peace and Development Party (AKP), appealing to voters to elect at least 300 parliamentarians to help push through a constitution that would expand his powers as an executive. But Sunday's stunning results make that a distant prospect. (Associated Press)

An implosion in Syria

The Obama administration's determination to stay clear of the civil war in Syria, understandable but dangerous, is a tale of red lines drawn and then ignored as if they had never been drawn. President Obama's brave talk followed by nothing much threatens to lead to an implosion of the region.

The American flag (AP Photo)

Honoring a symbol of sacrifice

There's no better day to wave the American flag than on the nation's birthday. But as the United States turns 239, the usual flotsam blowing in the wind urge fellow malcontents to burn it instead. Rather than honor the blood, sweat and tears of forebears, metaphorical if not actual, who set out to build "a more perfect union" in the wilderness, the flotsam trash the past and repudiate their debt to history.

Hillary's Illegal War Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary's secret war

In the course of my work, I am often asked by colleagues to review and explain documents and statutes. Recently, in conjunction with my colleagues Catherine Herridge and Pamela Browne, I read the transcripts of an interview Ms. Browne did with a man named Marc Turi, and Ms. Herridge asked me to review emails to and from State Department and congressional officials during the years when Hillary Clinton was the secretary of state.

Illustration on independence of mind in the current society by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

No thanks for these mummeries

CHICAGO -- That was a strange week, with intersecting conversations between and among Americans trying to absorb mind-crashing events that fed high- and lowbrow attitudes, populist and patrician criticisms, sophisticated and naive pronouncements. There were absurdities and abominations, a massacre and amazing grace. Politics was writ large, accompanied by the rumble of rhetoric shaped to fit the emotional tyranny of the moment rather than great truths.

Illustration on lower-cost tailored television choices by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

TV with a choice

Question: What do rabid football fans, working moms and Clifford the Big Red Dog viewers have in common?

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Speechwriter: A Brief Education in Politics'

From 2007 to 2010, Barton Swaim worked as a writer for Mark Sanford, the South Carolina governor who set out to hike the Appalachian Trail, ended up in Argentina where he found romance, and in the process gave the media the kind of story they're best at.

Illustration on the imposition of Common Core on U.S. schools by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ending Washington's mandate on Common Core

The United States Senate will soon begin debate on a bill to get the federal government out of our local classrooms by permanently ending Washington's mandate on Common Core.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Great Leader and the Fighter Pilot'

In September 1953, bold headlines dominated American newspapers. "Mystery Red MIG Lands Near Seoul," trumpeted the San Francisco Chronicle. The North Korean pilot, Lt. No Kum Suk, aged 21, was so disgusted with the totalitarian state shaped by the Soviet-installed dictator Kim Il Sung that he broke off a training flight to land near Seoul, the South Korean capital.

Despite clear signs of skepticism from the Obama administration, the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank has come together with remarkable swiftness. (Associated Press)

The Chinese puzzle

There's wide agreement that China is America's No. 1 foreign concern. But there's never been such a difference of opinion among China hands about what's happening in China, and what if anything the United States could and should do about it.

Obama delusional on Iran

The P5+1 negotiators with Iran follow the American lead, and that is why the talks have gone off-track. Both President Barack Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry seem to have trained at the Blanche DuBois Academy of Global Studies, where they were taught to rely on the kindness of strangers as Blanche did in "A Streetcar Named Desire." The French, applying real politik, would have provided firmer guidance.