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(Photo courtesy of The White House)

The surging truth-tellers of the GOP

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump is surging in New Hampshire, and Chris Christie’s back on the hunt, sounding like a born-again contender. They’re both long shots — the Donald is off the board — but they’re making the kind of noise the wiseheads say they can’t make.

Members of left wing parties hold placards reading in Greek ''NO'' next to a Presidential Guard, Evzonas, during a protest outside the Greek Parliament in Athens, Sunday, June 28, 2015. Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras says the Bank of Greece has recommended that banks remain closed and restrictions be imposed on transactions, after the European Central Bank didn't increase the amount of emergency liquidity the lenders can access from the central bank. (AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza)

The Greeks should vote “no!”

Voting “no” offers Greeks some prospects for better solutions, whereas voting “yes” guarantees penury.

Illustration on the uncontrolled growth of Federal banking regulation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The squeeze of regulatory kudzu

It is called the vine that ate the South. Kudzu was first introduced at the 1876 Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia as an ornamental plant for home gardens. It pretty much stayed that way for half a century, until the federal government got involved. The Roosevelt administration decided that kudzu would be helpful against soil erosion and made it a mission of the Soil Erosion Service to plant kudzu all across the South. Now kudzu covers 12,000 square miles. Kudzu is estimated to smother another 150,000 acres each year.

Energy Independence Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A declaration of energy independence

The United States is closer than ever before to fulfilling the vision of our Founding Fathers. By achieving energy independence, we can achieve freedom from foreign influence.

Fireworks Warning Label Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The sticky legalisms of wacky warning labels

Not too long ago, common sense ruled the day, so called because it was shared by nearly everybody. Common values, commonly understood sense of right and wrong, just and unjust, all expressed in a common language of fairness.

Illustration on raising the minimum wage in light of its effect on Puerto Rico by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Puerto Rico’s minimum-wage object lesson

A report released by the Puerto Rican government this week fingers the territory’s minimum wage as a prime factor in its emerging debt crisis. Though its economy is significantly less developed than even the poorest American states, it is still subject to the federal $7.25 minimum wage, 77 percent of its median wage. This high wage floor acts as a significant employment barrier, contributing to the island’s pathetic 43 percent labor force participation rate and its economic stagnation in general.

Illustration on lower-cost tailored television choices by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

TV with a choice

Question: What do rabid football fans, working moms and Clifford the Big Red Dog viewers have in common?

Meaningful Tax Cut Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Rand Paul’s ‘fair and flat’ tax proposal

Sen. Rand Paul’s flat tax plan is like a decent song in a world full of off-key voices. It hits all the right notes, including greater simplicity, lower rates for everyone, and a more competitive system of corporate taxation. But it has some small details that could use fine tuning.

Sen. Bernard Sanders, a Vermont independent who caucuses with the Democrats, is focusing on wealth disparity.

Bernie’s surge

If you Google Bernie Sanders, some surprising poll numbers will appear, showing the rumpled, self-described socialist gaining fast on Hillary Clinton in the race for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination.

Illustration on the shifting meaning of marriage in modern society by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The same-sex factor in ‘freedom from marriage’

Ross Douthat of The New York Times produced what is perhaps the most penetrating piece on the Supreme Court’s ruling last week on gay marriage. He notes that, long before the debate on that subject gained traction in U.S. politics, gay intellectuals carried on their own debate about marriage and how the gay community should view that venerable human institution.

Illustration on the imposition of Common Core on U.S. schools by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ending Washington’s mandate on Common Core

The United States Senate will soon begin debate on a bill to get the federal government out of our local classrooms by permanently ending Washington’s mandate on Common Core.

Export-Import Bank Providing Corporate Welfare Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Shutter the Ex-Im Bank—for good

Reauthorizing Ex-Im would be a step backwards at the time when our economy needs to move forward.

Related Articles

Marriage already available to all

People who rob banks are called bank robbers. People who tell a lie are called liars. People who play golf are called golfers. People who have sex with a partner of the same sex are called homosexuals or gay. People who have sex with an opposite-sex gender partner are called heterosexual.

Illustration on coming economic breakdowns by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How many more Greek tragedies?

Greece and too many other countries have been trying to defy gravity by living the good life on borrowed money. In 2001, the Greeks entered the eurozone, which gave them access to low-rate loans under the pretense that Greece was richer than it was. The seeds of the destruction that resulted in the closure of the banks this week were planted the day the Greeks adopted the euro. None of this should have been a surprise to anyone. The only thing for certain is that the Greeks will now suffer another major drop in their real incomes.

Are we safe?

Praying church members were recently killed during a shooting in Charleston ("Obama intent on gun restriction with or without help of Congress," Page I, June 22). We as a nation are outraged, knowing not even our churches are safe for peoople to attend and worship. Where does it all end? Who will step up to protect us from harm? We live in a society where we have earned the expectation of being able to walk the streets, attend grade schools and universities, go to movies and pray in our chosen houses of worship. We should not have to equip our kids or ourselves with military protective gear in order to do these everyday tasks.

Illustration on Iran's "North Korean strategy" for developing nuclear weapons by Linas Garsys

It's North Korea, all over again

We've seen this before. President Obama's Iran nuclear deal looks increasingly like the disastrous deal the United States struck with the regime in North Korea. In 1994, the U.S. government signed a nuclear deal with North Korea that, according to then-President Clinton, would "make the United States, the Korean Peninsula and the world safer." The agreement, we were told, did "not rely on trust," but instead would involve a verification program that would stop the North Koreans from ever acquiring a nuclear bomb. Sound familiar?

Illustration on connections between Rolling Stone's reporter and the Departmwent of Education in the UVA "rape" case by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Education Department's Rolling Stone reckoning

When one journalist (Chuck Ross of The Daily Caller) made a Freedom of Information Act request of the U.S. Department of Education about possible involvement of federal officials in the now-discredited Rolling Stone story, "A Rape on Campus," the department sent him a box with a CD in it.

 Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Director Katherine Archuleta testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington in June. FILE (Associated Press)

Compromised cybersecurity

We can add cybersecurity to the list of things Washington can't seem to handle. Given the enormous dimensions of recent data breaches suffered by keepers of federal employee records, it's apparent that the government's barriers to hackers are about as airtight as a screen door would be on a submarine. Americans working for the government shouldn't have to worry that their personal information is scrutinized by their counterparts in Beijing. Trust is a two-way street, and a government that compromises the privacy of its own hardly deserves trust.

A book and flowers lay at the scene of the attack in Sousse, Tunisia, Sunday, June 28, 2015. (AP Photo/Abdeljalil Bounhar)

Observing Ramadan with murder

Ramadan is Islam's period of religious reflection and observance, but this year, radical Muslims are making it a ritual of mayhem and murder. An outburst of attacks on innocents last week killed dozens. Traditionally a time of fasting to honor the Prophet Muhammad's first revelation of the Koran, the Islamic holy book, this year the leader of the Islamic State called his followers to make the month-long holiday a "calamity for the infidels." Ramadan comes to an end on July 17, but the killing almost certainly won't.

Illustration on the value of the U.S. Constitution by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

'We the People'

"We the People." We've heard that phrase so often it's easy to overlook its significance. But as we mark our nation's birthday, we should take a moment to ask ourselves: What is the role of the people?

The Washington Times. (Note: Ex-Im Bank does not directly finance military exports.)

Shut down the Export-Import Bank

Closing down the Ex-Im Bank is an important first step in the battle against the unhealthy marriage between the government and corporate America.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Days of Rage'

DAYS OF RAGE: AMERICA'S RADICAL UNDERGROUND, THE FBI, AND THE FORGOTTEN AGE OF REVOLUTIONARY VIOLENCE

Hillary Clinton spins her wheels

You don't need to be in New York City to notice the Hillary Clown Car is rolling along at full speed. It would, however, be dangerous to underestimate Hillary Clinton, the Democrats' likely nominee for the 2016 presidential contest, but as I've noted several times on Fox News, we are reminded time and again how this woman lost to an unknown, inexperienced lawyer from Chicago in 2008.

A new Hillary Clinton comic book does not leave out Benghazi (Bluewater Productions

Hillary Clinton comic book addresses Benghazi, email questions, 2016 and more

- The Washington Times

Frame by frame, moment by moment: a new Hillary Clinton comic book has now entered the political marketplce. From Bluewater Productions comes "Female Force: Hillary Clinton: The Road to the White House," which asks such probing questions as this: "Can she run on her record? Her likability? And how will lingering questions about Benghazi and her email inform her choice?"

In 2016, one way out

President Obama is making it painfully clear that he will leave a monarchial legacy of social, political and economic pain, severely diminished national security and racial discontent. Indeed, if elected, Hillary Clinton would leave a similar legacy, including gender discontent.

Atrocities aren't campaign stops

When President Obama came forth to condemn the recent slayings at a Charleston church, he delivered a political statement about guns, in effect making the situation about his agenda and disregarding the feelings of the families who were suffering a great loss. Hillary Clinton did the same thing, crafting her public comments about the atrocity in order to serve her own purposes. These two narcissists acted like children saying 'Look at me' instead of politicians giving thoughtful responses to mourners.

National Public Radio has transformed its Studio 4A into a war room for election night coverage. About 60 to 80 people will be answering phones, updating the Web site, NPR.org, and broadcasting live from about 7 p.m. to 3 a.m. on election night. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)

Snark and bias alert

Prime Minister David Cameron is a brave man. He has undertaken to take control and oversight of the prestigious BBC, the government broadcasting system, away from the arrogant elites and put the oversight into the hands of the people who pay for it.