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Centennial High School senior Doyle Trout, left, and his classmates react as his childhood and high school photographs appear on the screen during the senior slide show during graduation on Saturday, May 16, 2015. Trout, a four-time state wrestling champion who lost his left leg in an accident, is going to the University of Wyoming on a wrestling scholarship. Wyoming is honoring Trout's scholarship, and he hopes to wrestle again someday but doing that won't be easy.(Francis Gardler/The Journal-Star via AP) LOCAL TELEVISION OUT; KOLN-TV OUT; KGIN-TV OUT; KLKN-TV OUT

What I know: advice for the real world

Make the face you show the world—in interviews, on the job, socially and professionally—the reflection of what’s in your heart and mind.

Paula Jones smiles during a news conference in Dallas, in this April 16, 1998, file photo. Encouraged by an outside lawyer, Paula Jones is ready to insist on $2 million, half from President Clinton and half from a New York tycoon, in exchange for dropping her sexual harassment lawsuit, two legal sources involved in the case said Saturday, Oct. 17, 1998. (AP Photo/LM Otero) ** FILE **

Paula Jones: Reprise of a famous bimbo eruption

- The Washington Times

For the Republicans, worthy or not, Hillary and Bubba are the gift that keeps on giving. Whoever is responsible for writing the thank-you notes has a big job ahead. The dynamic duo keep a network of warehouses just to house and keep track of the gifts. No wonder Hillary needs her own Internet server.

Illustration on the move to remove Andrew Jackson from the twenty dollar bill by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The cheap currency of judging historical figures by today’s standards

New York Times columnist Gail Collins is on a tear. Her sense of civic rectitude oozes from her prose. Her characteristic breezy haughtiness is on full display. The moral imperative that has caught her fancy and led to two columns in as many months: Getting that angular-faced Andrew Jackson off the $20 bill and replacing him with a woman, preferably an African-American or American Indian.

Illustration on Net Neutrality by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

New rules make the Internet’s future look very 20th century

Like a thief in the night, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) recently denied eight separate petitions requesting the agency delay the implementation of new Internet regulations while they are challenged in court. While the late-afternoon news dump and decision was predictable, it is no less disappointing that the Internet will soon be subjected to 20th century telephone monopoly-era regulations.

No substitute for seriousness in Iraq

A recent weekend brought two very different dispatches from the front lines of the global war on terror. The first was a tale of tactical success; the second a narrative of strategic failure.

Positive Messages Hit the Mark Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Conservatism, the Chevy of American leadership

Imagine General Motors trying to sell you a Chevy truck by airing an ad featuring a Ford F-150 pickup truck bursting into flames, killing a family of four and ending with anguished relatives waiting for news of their loved ones in a hospital emergency room.

Illustration on adjusting Section 215 of the Patriot Act by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Amending the Patriot Act, not ending it

The Senate, which will never be known for an overly demanding work schedule, returns from its week-long recess a whole day early to deal with the mess being made of one of our most important anti-terrorist intelligence programs. That program, now encompassed by Section 215 of the unfortunately named Patriot Act, has its roots in the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978, or FISA.

Illistration on adjusting Export-Import bank policies by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A Reaganesque solution to the Ex-Im Bank dilemma

Opposition to the U.S. Export-Import Bank (Ex-Im) is now at the point where the bank’s reauthorization is genuinely in doubt. Spurred by accusations of corporate welfare, crony capitalism and outright corruption, opponents believe the Ex-Im Bank’s palpable violation of free-market principles fully warrants its early demise.

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Don't transform America; perfect it

President Obama and others who think like him want to "fundamentally transform" the United States. Yet in order to become successful, many of these people took advantage of opportunities provided them by the United States — before any transformation had taken place.

Christians not leaving Israel

Reading "Pope Francis canonizes first modern Palestinian saints in heavily symbolic move" (Web, May 17) an unsuspecting reader might think that Christian Arabs are persecuted in all of Israel, not just in the West Bank and Gaza. The same reader might also get the impression that Christian Arabs are leaving Israel. Neither of these is true.

Missing world leader by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Making the JV team of world leaders

British Prime Minister David Cameron's recent stunning victory for his Conservative party catapulted him to one of the three top Western world leaders, alongside Germany's Angela Merkel and France's Francois Hollande. Mr. Cameron wasn't supposed to win for numerous reasons, not the least of which because of his austerity policies and vigorous opposition from Labor and Liberal parties that thought a bigger government was the key to Britain's growth.

Illustration on missing Muldovan bank funds by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Who took Moldova's millions -- the crooks or the Kremlin?

On the eve of a national election in tiny Moldova last November, $450 million -- equal to 10 percent of the Eastern European country's entire annual gross domestic product -- went missing. So far, no one knows where it went.

Bringing historical insights to the bar

Perhaps it's something in the water: The National Archives has an ongoing exhibit, "Spirited Republic," celebrating America's love affair with drink. And last week this newspaper reported skullduggery in Kentucky where whiskey has been burgled by the barrel and one brand of local hooch fetches $2,000 a bottle. Now comes a book to champion bourbon alone. Perhaps we're getting over the hangover of Prohibition, and it's OK to enjoy drinking again, "responsibly," of course.

Farcical Obama Speech Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama's hot-air commencement address

I didn't attend my commencement ceremony at American University in Washington, D.C. I chose instead to receive my degree in the mail. I didn't want to listen to a boring speaker, likely unaffiliated with the school or anyone in it, drone on in Washington's notorious summer heat.

FILE - In this Nov. 12, 2014 file photo, the HealthCare.gov website, where people can buy health insurance, on a laptop screen, is seen in Portland, Ore. If the latest health overhaul case before the Supreme Court gets decided the way most Republicans want, it could have a politically painful unintended consequence for GOP lawmakers.   (AP Photo/Don Ryan, File)

Paying the devil in the details

Obamacare seems about to implode, and the implosion could be a great contribution to those who would reform America's health system in a systematic way. The nation will have to get it right the second time around.

Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus speaks at the Southern Republican Leadership Conference in Oklahoma City, on Thursday, May 21, 2015. (AP Photo/Alonzo Adams)

Setting up the presidential debates

Out of work politicians with time on their hands once occupied themselves by fishing, collecting stamps or learning full-hitch macrame. But that was so 20th century. Now they run for president, some of them more than once, sometimes with no more experience at dealing with problems than talking about them. Is this a great country, or what? But running for president finally threatens to overwhelm the presidential debates.

Obama let the Islamic State grow

What did President Obama mean in October 2012 when he said the greatest geopolitical threat to the United States was al Qaeda? Hadn't he recently been yelling at college kids that al Qaeda had been decimated?

Email scandal a security risk

Since a Romanian hacker was able to read some of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's emails, we can be sure that foreign intelligence services were very likely able to do the same. Knowing that Mrs. Clinton was a potential presidential candidate, the foreign intelligence services probably have kept complete files.

No more Clintons

Hillary Clinton should do the honorable thing and bow out gracefully. Her scandal-ridden resume makes her ineligible to hold the highest office in this great nation. She is detrimental to the Democratic Party and will put the United States in further peril as the opposition will not let up in exposing her past, and free nations of the world will have less respect for our country.

Anti-gay 'therapy' is a choice

U.S. Reps. Ted W. Lieu and Jackie Speier, both California Democrats, are behind a House bill that would ban so-called gay "conversion therapy." They claim being homosexual is not a disorder ("Gay-conversion therapy ban to be introduced in House," Web, May 18). Wow. How can they say that homosexuality is not a disorder when it's obvious that a homosexual mind (or orientation) in a heterosexual body is a mind-body mismatch, just as a female mind in a male body and a male mind in a female body are mismatches?

Visitors touches the names at the wall of Vietnam Veterans Memorial, during a Memorial Day candlelight vigil at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, DC., Friday, May 22, 2015.  (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

'Peace is the right memorial'

Memorial Day in America has traditionally been a time when we pay our respects to those who gave their lives, over a century ago, in a tragic civil war. In a broader sense, it has come to stand not only for the sacrifice of those who served in the War Between the States, but for all of those who have given their lives in arms since the birth of our nation.