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Barack Obama   Associated Press photo

A dog whistle by the master

- The Washington Times

Barack Obama has the master wordsmith’s gift for bending language, saying something that sounds good, but heard as something not so good.

Sen. Jim Webb Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Jim Webb, a maverick with a message

It’s going to be easy — and fun for some — to dismiss the presidential candidacy of former Virginia Sen. Jim Webb, if he actually decides to run.

An attitude of gratitude

Is there anything in the world that can stop the United States of America? We were born struggling against the British Empire — the most powerful entity at the time — and we totally wiped the floor with those crumpet-gobblers.

Congress Controls Purse Strings to Neutralize Executive Orders Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The coming Washington war

If you thought the bare-knuckled, no-holds-barred, midterm elections were rough, the last two years of Barack Obama’s presidency will make that look like a Sunday school picnic.

Illustration on a coalition government for Libya by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Opening the door to a peaceful Libya

We all remember how in February 2011 the Arab Spring reached Libya, and Libyans came together to overthrow a 42-year-old dictatorship that crushed any semblance of democracy, freedom and free will.

Illustration on Bill Cosby by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Bill Cosby’s message survives personal disaster

What’s fascinating about the coverage of the persuasive accusations against Bill Cosby, now 18 and rising, is that race doesn’t dominate. There’s an outcry at the abuse of women, and he’s shredded the healthy black-father family man image he carefully cultivated on his sitcom, but you don’t read or hear notice taken of the fact that the women who say he drugged and raped them were usually white.

John Winthrop Portrait

The truly first Thanksgiving

What sustained both Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay was that, thankfully, America could be carved into a better community for all, providing that elusive but mysterious challenge that was missing from the lives of so many in England.

Death of the Sexual Revolution Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The joy of sex is over

So this is how the sexual revolution is ending. It is ending with gangs of angry women recalling alleged sexual assaults up to a half-century ago. Their alleged assailant in this case is the avuncular 77-year-old Bill Cosby.

illustration on the values of life and government by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Our gratitude belongs not to government, but to God

What if the government is designed to perpetuate itself? What if the real levers of governmental power are pulled by agents, diplomats and bureaucrats behind the scenes? What if they stay in power no matter who is elected president or which major political party controls Congress?

Illegal Aliens and Illegal Executive Orders Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama has forgotten his official duty is to Americans

Like millions of other Americans, I appreciate the plight of billions of people throughout the world who would like nothing more than to find themselves in the United States, where they could enjoy a much higher standard of living and wonderful opportunities for advancement. It should first be considered, however, that we have millions of people already mired in dire poverty.

Related Articles

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry addresses the media after the closed-door nuclear talks with Iran, in Vienna, Austria, Monday, Nov. 24, 2014. Facing still significant differences between the U.S. and Iran, negotiators gave up on last-minute efforts to get a nuclear deal by the Monday deadline and extended their talks for another seven months. The move gives both sides breathing space to work out an agreement but may be badly received by domestic sceptics, since it extends more than a decade of diplomatic efforts to curb Iran's nuclear prowess. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

EDITORIAL: Iran stalls again

The lot of a diplomat is not always a happy one. Life in striped pants can be challenging. So much Chablis and brie, so little time. It's not all polite chatter. In the matter of the crucial talks over the future of Iran's nuclear program, all the pushing and pulling of policy, all the huffing and puffing of inflamed egos, will probably be for naught. Sooner or later, unless the Israelis rescue the West from fear and indecision, Iran will have its Islamic bomb.

EDITORIAL: The pigs find a loophole

"Earmarks," small, large and enormous pots of taxpayers' money that congressmen give themselves to fund pet projects in their districts, usually in return for votes, are a lot like Count Dracula. They won't stay dead. But last week the Republicans in the House put down an attempt by one of their own to resurrect them.

Congress Wields the Budget Ax Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Restoring regular order on Capitol Hill

So long as they do not overplay their hand, Republicans in the U.S. House and Senate have been given a wonderful opportunity to significantly pare the federal budget and shape U.S. policy in the last two years of the Obama administration.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Drug-free or land of free?

Thank you for making the case for civil forfeiture reform in your recent editorial ("Time for civil-forfeiture reform," Web, Nov. 17). Right now, police can confiscate cars, cash and homes without charging owners with a crime. Vague allegations of drug trafficking don't justify turning protectors of the peace into financial predators. The drug war threatens the integrity of a country founded on the concept of limited government.

Illustration on the effects of Obama's illegal alien order on the African American population by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How about putting Americans first?

The framers of the Constitution sought to limit the power of government and expand individual liberty. President Obama sees it the other way. Whether he violated the constitutional limits of his power will be debated and possibly decided in the courts and by the new Republican majority in Congress, but there is another issue surrounding the amnesty order that needs addressing.

In this undated photo provided by Anheuser-Busch, Lt. Chuck Nadd and his girlfriend Shannon Cantwell wave as they ride aboard the famously-red Budweiser beer wagon pulled by Clydesdales in a parade, led by a marching band in Winter Park, Fla. The brewer has fashioned an ad around the parade that will run during the Super Bowl.(AP Photo/Anheuser-Busch, Hand Out)

Just say whoa: Budweiser ditching beloved Clydesdales in their advertising

- The Washington Times

It is a cultural moment in advertising: Budweiser is unhitching the iconic team of Clydesdale horses which has appeared in their commercials for 27 years, charming a global audience and creating herds of fans. But no more. The beer maker is now alarmed by falling sales and huge competition from craft beers - and is intent on retooling its image for a younger crowd.

Illustration on the removal of Chuck Hagel by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Dumping Hagel at Defense

The abrupt resignation of Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has a few important facts behind it, but it is probably tied to a shift in President Obama's strategy in Afghanistan.

Illustration on further Union intrusion on McDonald's and other franchises by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Going overboard at the labor board

Whom do you work for? Such a simple question should not require a government agency to give an answer. However, the Obama administration, in its never-ending quest for power over individuals and businesses, has decided that it — rather than you or your employer — should determine whom you work for.

President Barack Obama, left, reaches over to touch Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, left, following an announcement of Hagel's resignation during an event in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, Monday, Nov. 24, 2014. Hagel is stepping down under pressure from Obama's Cabinet, senior administration officials said Monday, following a tenure in which he has struggled to break through the White House's insular foreign policy team. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

What Hagel's exit means

Chuck Hagel's decision signified only one thing: Barack Obama no longer enjoys the confidence of the American military establishment.

ISIS and Obama Flags Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Sailing in uncharted Mideast waters

With an anti-war activist as commander in chief who pursues a "progressive" agenda, the result can be devastating. Clearly, the country is being led into uncharted waters. While it is a given that no president in recent history has faced the multitude of threats facing the country, most of them are a result of President Obama's own policies. The Nov. 4 election results signal that Americans want a clear change in direction.

Republicans will soon be empowered to adopt a number of much-needed reforms that will point Congress in the right direction. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

EDITORIAL: Putting momentum in harness

Congressional lethargy and inaction in the wake of the Republican wave of 2010 is not the fault of the Republicans, no matter how loud the cries of frustrated liberals. Over the course of the current Congress, the House of Representatives passed nearly 350 bills, only to see them die in Harry Reid's Senate. Some of them surely deserved death, but not all.

Mark Petrik and Dennis Smith dig out their south Buffalo driveway on Saturday, Nov. 22, 2014, in Buffalo, N.Y. Western New York continues to dig out from the heavy snow dropped by this week by lake-effect snowstorms. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)

EDITORIAL: The snows of global warming

Pity the plight of upstate New Yorkers, buried under six feet of snow. The folks who dwell in the lee of the Great Lakes are accustomed to deep drifts of white magic in winter, but a winter wonderland doesn't look so magical when the solstice is still a month away. November is not supposed to behave like January. Some of the global warming "experts" attribute the cause of the early snow to "global warming."

BOOK REVIEW: 'Napoleon: A Life'

Reviewing one of Andrew Roberts' earlier books, an English critic wrote that "as well as being intelligent, hard-working and opinionated, he gets great fun out of his writing.