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(Image courtesy of thestar.com).

Life’s a scream on the slippery slope

- The Washington Times

“The slippery slope” doesn’t frighten very many people in Washington because that’s where a lot of politicians live. Life can be comfortable there, and it’s usually quite profitable. But it’s a dangerous piece of real estate for the rest of us.

There’s good news about third-party candidates

The conventional wisdom is that an independent presidential bid by New York billionaire Donald Trump would harm the Republican candidate in 2016. That’s probably incorrect. Most often, significant independent general-election candidacies harm the incumbent or incumbent party more than they do the challenging party.

Illustration contrasting Reagan's dealings with the Soviets and Obama's with Iran by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘Barack Obama, you’re no Ronald Reagan’

In a recent interview defending the proposed nuclear agreement with Iran, President Obama argued that that his approach to Iran is essentially the same as that which Ronald Reagan took toward the Soviet Union. Mr. Obama said that ” where I completely admire him was his recognition that [an agreement would be worth doing] if you were able to verify an agreement that you would negotiate with the evil empire that was hell-bent on our destruction and was a far greater existential threat to us than Iran will ever be.”

Illustration on Obama's undermining of the U.S. military by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Undermining the military

When President Obama announced that he was going to “fundamentally transform” America, not many Americans understood the full depth of that statement. Based on an assessment of his policies over the last six and half years, clearly one of Mr. Obama’s objectives has been to diminish America’s standing and leadership role throughout the world. One result has been that our allies now don’t trust us and our enemies don’t fear us — the worst possible combination.

President Johnson signs Medicare legislation July 30, 1965.                Associated Press photo

Medicare at age 50

Diehard defenders of President Obama’s continuing, wretched rollout of the Affordable Care Act may be quick to point out that other government programs, most notably Medicare, also had rocky starts. But the historical record doesn’t support such nonsense.

Illustration on courtesy, respect and rules in the U.S. Senate by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When tough talk roils the decorum of the Senate

The United States Senate has a long and justly celebrated tradition of comity and respect among members. Although there have been occasional exceptions throughout history, on the whole, senators have taken great care to treat each other with courtesy and respect, both in private discussions and in public deliberations.

Peace Through Strength Bunker Bomb Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Reviving ‘peace through strength’

Ever since the Ayatollah Khomeini and his Islamist storm troops took over Iran in 1979, the driving force of the country’s rulers has been (1) destroy Israel; (2) establish Iran as the hegemonist of the Middle East; and (3) drive out all Western influences from the region. Their efforts to create a nuclear arsenal has been part of their strategy to accomplish these goals.

Illustration on the controversy stirred during the creation of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Surviving ‘a perfect storm’ of opposition

Just two months ago, the nation marked the 40th anniversary of the fall of Saigon, and many of the stories in the media were illustrated with images of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial on the Mall, which over the past three decades has become an American cultural icon — symbolizing that difficult period in our history. Yet, that memorial, as we know it today, almost didn’t happen.

Related Articles

Retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson, a native of Detroit,  lays out his presidential platform Monday, May 4, 2015, at Detroit's Music Hall that he is running for president. I'm Ben Carson and I'm a candidate for president for the United States," Carson said, before declaring — incorrectly now — that "I'm not a politician." Carson will now visit Texas, where his mother is gravely ill, before flying to Iowa to campaign. (Regina H. Boone/Detroit Free Press via AP)

Ben Carson, Rand Paul among GOP luminaries attending rally against Planned Parenthood at US Capitol

- The Washington Times

Student-organized "Women Betrayed" rallies are numerous on Tuesday against Planned Parenthood following the release of three undercover videos offering evidence that the organization profited from the sale of aborted baby parts. Sixty events are planned in cities nationwide, according to Students for Life President Kristan Watkins. Some GOP heavyweights will attend the event in the nation's capital.

Amazon Watch an Ecuador advocate

Your July 15, 2015, article about Amazon Watch's ongoing campaign to hold Chevron accountable for its 18-billion-gallon toxic mess in Ecuador omits critical facts and propagates falsehoods ("Amazon Watch still backs Steven Donziger's discredited Chevron lawsuit after others bail," Web).

President should protect all life

President Obama, a strong gun-control advocate, is at it again. He takes to the airways to selectively use tragic gun killings to advance the cause of taking guns away from innocent, law-abiding gun owners ("Obama 'most frustrated' by inability to pass gun control,' Web, July 24) .

With Obama, assume the worst

Why are veterans stunned and baffled by President Obama's late-night talk-show "rosy assessment" of VA reforms ("Obama touts VA progress, claims wait times reduced to 'just a few days,'" Web, July 21)?

Harry S. Truman

Where is a Democratic barn-burner?

If the Democrats want to be taken seriously, and something more than a party of self-righteous whiners, they must start acting like the party of Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S Truman and John F. Kennedy. All the fun shouldn't be left to the Republicans. Why should the nation be deprived of a contest for the Democratic nomination for president, the usual cat fight that always invigorated Democratic Party politics?

Tel Aviv has long sought the release of Jonathan Pollard, a former intelligence analyst convicted in 1987 of spying for Israel. He is serving a life sentence. (Associated Press)

Parole for Jonathan Pollard

Close relationships, whether human or nation-to-nation, are always complicated. Almost any Thanksgiving Day dinner table is a demonstration of that, with brothers and sisters and cousins and aunts stepping carefully to avoid spoiling the turkey and spilling the cranberries. So it is with nation-to-nation relationships, too. As close it is, no country-to-country relationship is more complicated than America's relationship with Israel.

Earth Igloo Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Promoting very unsettled science

If you have been to the beach at Treasure Island, Florida (adjoining St. Petersburg), you will notice something very odd. The hotels (many of which were built in the 1950s and '60s) and the seawall are very far from the water in the Gulf of Mexico — giving an extraordinarily wide beach. It was not always that way. When the hotels and seawall were built, they were set back from the high tide a normal hundred yards or so; but over the years, there was a natural but unforeseen accretion to the beach — which, having grown up in the area, I observed. (It can be seen on Google Earth.)

Illustration on the dominance of the U.N in the Obama/Iran nuclear arms deal by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Fantasists, bumblers and Iran

First the Obama administration denied that any secret side deals were made when they negotiated the agreement that they insist us will prevent Iran from producing and deploying nuclear weapons. Secretary of State Kerry assured us that it was a "fantasy" to believe there could have been a better deal, and the president said the only alternative is war.

Earth to Kepler-452b

NASA has discovered the answer to all of our problems. It is another planet, a possible twin to Earth that could theoretically sustain life.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Being Nixon: A Man Divided'

Slowly but surely, the ranks of the rabid Nixon haters are thinning, to be replaced by more thoughtful and temperate writers and historians, free from the fierce ideological biases of the last century, able to look at Richard Nixon's accomplishments as well as his failures, and to examine the man himself without the intense personal rancor of an earlier ideological era.

Alternative delegate from Jean, La., Billy Durnley wears a large elephant buckle at the Republican National Convention, Tampa, Fla., Tuesday, August 28, 2012. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

Creating a case for conservatism

Being conservative in a politically correct culture has never been easy. Whether you're a politician trying to explain a controversial sound-bite, or a voter attempting to defend your stance on a hot-button issue to co-workers, you either grow a thick skin -- or learn to keep quiet.

Illustration on ending taxpayer funding of Planned Parenthood by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The moral terrorism of Planned Parenthood

Like many of you, when I first heard the undercover video of a Planned Parenthood official discussing in a detached and macabre manner the selling of aborted baby parts, I was physically sickened.

Robot rights rule!

The season of the Theater of the Absurd continues. After the Supreme Court twisted the clear meaning of plain English words to save Obamacare and bless same-sex marriage, after Iran hoodwinked Barack Obama into preserving and expanding its nuclear program, after Bruce Jenner remade himself (herself? itself?) into a buxom synthetic female, no one should be surprised when R2D2 wakes up to demand his civil rights, too. This might not be what Mr. Obama had in mind, but a conscientious radical accepts everything new, bad or not.

Time for John McCain to go

Though not even close to having decided upon my choice of presidential candidate 2016, I support Donald Trump's interpretation of Sen. John McCain, Arizona Republican ("Trump fires back after 'crazies' remark: McCain a hero 'because he was captured,'" Web, July 18). I am not a McCain fan. Mr. Trump speaks his mind and more of what he has been saying should be said across this nation of ours.

Scaffolding continues to go up on the dome of the U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, D.C., Thursday, September 18, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

End run by the credit unions

George Stigler won the 1982 Nobel Prize in Economics for work that changed forever the way economists look at government regulation of business and industry. Before Mr. Stigler, a colleague of Milton Friedman in the Chicago school of economics, the economists and politicians accepted the argument that government regulatory agencies, established to protect the public from abuse, accomplished exactly that. After Mr. Stigler's groundbreaking work, that sentiment was shared not so much.

Illustration on animal rights groups assault on Christianity by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Gospel according to PETA

The decline of Judeo-Christian values in the United States is a topic of concern that's been analyzed greatly over the past decades. Less discussed is this: What if the left co-opts these values?