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Supporting the Gold Standard Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Liberty and wealth require sound money

Conservatives hold that wealth and liberty correlate. This proposition was self-evident in the context of the Cold War and remains true today.

Illustration by Clement, National Post, Toronto, Canada

Bomb or occupy — or neither?

Wars usually end only when the defeated aggressor thinks it would be futile to resume the conflict. Lasting peace follows if the loser is then forced to change its political system into something other than what it was.

Illustration on options dealing with the Islamic State by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How to play the ISIS card

The Islamic State, Islamic quasi-state that has conquered parts of Iraq and Syria, has threatened America with terrorist attacks and drawn us back into an Iraq war.

Illustration on Ayaan Hirsi Ali speaking at Yale by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

God, woman and free speech at Yale

When Ayaan Hirsi Ali, the brave human-rights activist and a native of Somalia, spoke at Yale last week, 300 students turned out to listen. Others were turned away because security was so tight. The sponsors were almost apologetic because there was no controversy.

James Clapper          T.J. Kirkpatrick/The Washington Times

Throwing Clapper under the bus

When President Obama attributed the rise in Iraq of the Islamic State, or ISIS, to the failures of the U.S. intelligence community earlier this week, naming and blaming directly National Intelligence Director James R. Clapper, he was attempting to deflect criticism of his own incompetence.

Secretary of State John Kerry, center, and US Ambassador to the UN Samantha Power, left, listen as President Barack Obama speaks during a bilateral meeting to discuss the Ebola epidemic with Ethiopian President Hailemariam Desalegn, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2014 in New York. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

A coherent strategy for the Middle East

The latest strategy put forth by the Obama administration to combat the Islamic State jihadists not only changes weekly, but fails to address U.S. strategic core objectives in the Middle East. Most dubious is its reliance on so-called “moderate rebels” to provide a ground component to a U.S. air campaign.

Illustration on the damage being done by Obamacare by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Obamacare, one year later

As a doctor and congressman, I’m often asked what I prefer to be called. The answer for me is always doctor.

Illustration on U.S. reinvolvement against ISIS by Schot/De Volkskrant, Amsterdam, Netherlands

A Mideast policy rewritten in blood

The two most critical rules of warfare are to never tell your enemy what you will not do and to never be seen as a reluctant, vacillating warrior.

Illustration on Netanyahu's comment that ISIS and Hamas "are branches on the same poisonous tree" by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The irony of endorsing Palestinians while bombing ISIS

Speaking to the United Nations General Assembly on Monday, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu responded strongly to an earlier verbal attack launched by Palestinian Authority Chairman Mahmoud Abbas.

Related Articles

FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2014, file photo, Defense Intelligence Agency Director Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. Flynn, the three-star Army general who has headed the Defense Intelligence Agency for less than two years is being nudged aside amid conflict within the agency and between the general and leaders elsewhere in the intelligence community, a senior defense official said Wednesday, April 30. (AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke, File)

A promise to defend America on the cheap

- The Washington Times

Maybe President Obama is beginning to understand the Islamist threat against America. Maybe. If he does, we'll owe a debt to the Americans who lost their heads to the barbarians. He still doesn't understand what he has to do about it.

BOOK REVIEW: 'A World Elsewhere'

This is one of those books that operates on two distinct levels. On the one hand, it is the story of Aimee Ellis, a young American woman who falls in love with and marries Heinrich von Hoyningen-Huene, a Baltic aristocrat, goes to live in pre-Hitler Germany and stays there for the next two tumultuous decades.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Conservative Internationalism'

After a full century's steady string of wars, each related to the others as in a continuing narrative, one political scientist has undertaken to categorize them and their warrior practitioners.

Illustration on gun control in Colorado by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Colorado's Second Amendment wildfire

- The Washington Times

Last year, in the wake of the Sandy Hook school shootings in Connecticut, the Obama administration and then-New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg worked to put together a "coalition of the willing" to join them in a war on the Second Amendment and hit upon Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper as a likely recruit.

President Paul Kagame of Rwanda, left, meets with United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on the sidelines of the 69th session of the U.N. General Assembly at U.N. headquarters, Sept. 27, 2014. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

EDITORIAL: Africa needs a hand up, not more U.N. handouts

Leaders from 140 world nations will gather in New York City this week for the meetings of the U.N. General Assembly, to sit still to be "inspired" by the theme of "Delivering on and Implementing a Transformative Post-2015 Development Agenda." Translated from bureaucratese, the official language of the U.N., that means, "We want you to raise your taxes and impose more regulations --- for your own good."

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy holds up a pen before signing new emission guidelines during an announcement of a plan to cut carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by 30 percent by 2030, Monday, June 2, 2014, at EPA headquarters in Washington.  In a sweeping initiative to curb pollutants blamed for global warming, the Obama administration unveiled a plan Monday that cuts carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by nearly a third over the next 15 years, but pushes the deadline for some states to comply until long after President Barack Obama leaves office. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

An opportunity to rein in the EPA

In the absence of action by Congress, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has taken dramatic and unprecedented steps to craft energy policy in this country by issuing new regulations regarding carbon-dioxide emissions.

Illustration on the offense/defense relationship of the ACLU and American Christianity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Score: Prayer 1,000, ACLU 0

After Oneida, Tenn., school officials decided not to fight the American Civil Liberties Union's (ACLU) demand that they cease an opening prayer before high school football games, the school's cheerleaders tackled the matter.