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Trump, unfiltered

Meryl Streep generated huge laughs from the assembled Golden Globe Award audience with her swipe at then-President-elect Donald Trump. Are we going to restore “civility, truth and kindness” to our culture by attacking her?

Education Secretary-designate Betsy DeVos testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017, at her confirmation hearing before the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Betsy DeVos and the right side of history

In the early 1990s, I was elected Jersey City’s first Republican mayor in almost a century by a narrow margin. But when I ran for re-election, in this only 6 percent Republican city, I won with 69 percent of the vote, brought in all nine of my city council candidates, and even won five of the city’s eight housing projects.

The American flag flies in front of the U.S. Capitol dome at sunset on Capitol Hill in Washington in this Nov. 18, 2016, file photo. The end of the 2016 presidential election is at hand. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, file)

Frittering away the funds

I have good news for lawmakers looking to purge wasteful spending from the federal budget: It’s a target-rich environment out there.

Trump’s $10 trillion stimulus plan

All of Washington seems to be in cardiac arrest over the news reports late last week that President Donald Trump is planning a budget with $10 trillion of budget cuts over the next decade.

The 45 percent tariff

President Trump’s proposed 45 percent tariff on Chinese imports could leverage significant changes in trade with the Middle Kingdom, but to succeed he must address Beijing more realistically than past presidents.

Preventing another Pearl Harbor

North Korea regularly threatens to turn the United States and neighboring states into “a sea of fire,” and reportedly has the capability now to launch nuclear weapons at targets in South Korea and Japan. In a televised address this New Year’s Day, North Korea’s eccentric leader, Kim Jong Un, claimed that preparations were nearly complete for testing an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) capable of striking the United States.

Nobel Prize Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump’s Nobel Peace Prize

History will judge whether former President Obama deserved the Nobel Peace Prize he was awarded shortly after being elected the 44th president of the United States. President Trump has the historic opportunity to truly earn this prestigious award by using his self-proclaimed mastery of deal-making to resolve one of the world’s intractable conflicts of the former Soviet Union; namely, the “frozen conflict” between Azerbaijan and Armenia over the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh.

President-elect Donald Trump, left, and his wife Melania Trump arrive to the "Make America Great Again Welcome Concert" at the Lincoln Memorial, Thursday, Jan. 19, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

A hearty last laugh for the Donald

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump’s greatest contribution to America will be his stripping the media, particularly the overpaid and undereducated television media, of its last pretense to fairness and objectivity.

Russian President Vladimir Putin takes part in the launching ceremony of Bovanenkovo-Ukhta 2 gas pipeline and the Zapolyarye-Purpe and Kuyumba-Taishet oil pipelines via video link in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017. (Alexei Druzhinin/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

The Trump-Putin friendship

As President-elect Donald Trump prepares to take office today, yet another nominee in his forthcoming Cabinet is staking out sharp differences with his views on foreign policy.

Classified Dossier Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Democrats’ ‘dossier’

The recent intelligence report on Russian interference in the election concluded that the Russian government was behind the hacking and release of Democratic emails. The assumed purpose of these activities was an effort to support the candidacy of Donald Trump, even though the report acknowledged that the Russian government believed Hillary Clinton was likely to win the election anyway.

Texas Power Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The power of Rick Perry

As former energy secretaries in a Republican and Democratic administration, we can say with complete confidence that President-elect Donald Trump has made an excellent choice in nominating Rick Perry to be secretary of energy. From our perspective, Mr. Perry has precisely the background, skill set and vision needed to effectively oversee the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and guide the nation’s energy strategies.

Related Articles

Policy end good for Cubans

Mr. Antonio Bened bemoans the repeal of the "wet feet, dry feet" immigration policy by President Obama ("Obama's betrayal of the Cuban people," Web, Jan. 17). Said policy puts Cubans who reach U.S. soil on a fast track to permanent residency. He and I disagree on this issue.

Protestors gather for a march on the Capitol Building as preparations continue ahead of the presidential inauguration, Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

A tantrum for the Inaugural

No one likes to lose, but the sweet taste of victory makes the risk worth it. In the race to become the 45th president of the United States, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump put everything on the line, and Hillary lost. She seems to be taking it as a grown-up must, but the sting of defeat has been too much for many of the Democrats, and legions of them promise to disrupt Friday's Inauguration Day festivities.

FILE - In this undated file photo provided by the U.S. Army, Pfc. Chelsea Manning poses for a photo wearing a wig and lipstick. On Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017, President Barack Obama commuted the sentence of Chelsea Manning, who leaked Army documents and is serving 35 years. (U.S. Army via AP, File)

Undeserved mercy for Chelsea Manning

The difference between real life, where most Americans live, and life inside the bubble, as President Obama described the place where many Democrats fled to, has never been illustrated more vividly than in the commutation of the sentence of Chelsea (nee Bradley) Manning, who was serving 35 years in prison for betraying her country.

Ryan's immigration betrayal

House Speaker Paul Ryan has seen fit to fire a shot across the president-elect's bow regarding illegal immigrants ("Paul Ryan rules out Donald Trump's 'deportation force,'" Web, Jan. 12). He's a traitor to his party and to all the Democrats and Republicans who voted for Donald Trump.

New college course needed

The strong support of Sen. Bernie Sanders among college students in the recent presidential campaign shows a dreadful lack of economic understanding. Therefore I strongly suggest a new college course be created: "The Economics of Venezuela."

BOOK REVIEW: 'Just Another Jihadi Jane'

Over the last few years the western press has been regularly punctuated by accounts of young Islamic people who have left their American or European homes to take up arms in the sea of struggles in the Middle East. Some have achieved notoriety for their savage actions; some have died, and some have simply disappeared.

FILE - In this May 10, 2016, file photo, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un waves at parade participants at the Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea. North Korea is marking Kim Jong Un's birthday Sunday, Jan. 8, 2017 in a decidedly low-key manner. Though the young leader's birthday is well-known throughout the country, it has yet to be celebrated with the kind of adulatory festivities that accompany the birthdays of his late grandfather and father. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E, File)

China's boost to North Korean nukes

Allowing North Korea to make consistent progress toward the fielding of a nuclear-armed intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) capable of reaching most American cities can be considered President Obama's most serious failure in national security and non-proliferation.

Angels Coming Together Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The 'better angels' under siege

One circus closes, another comes to town. Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey, "the greatest show on Earth," is striking the big top for good, and has sent its elephants -- who looked like they enjoyed the attention -- to an assisted-living home for pachyderms. But the elephant lives on T-shirts, hats, caps and banners decorating the nation's capital this week.

Education Quality Harmed by the Teachers Union Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trying a different way

Some years ago a friend of mine wrote a book titled "The Seven Last Words of the Church, or, We've Never Tried It That Way Before." It is about what he regarded as the entrenched bureaucracies in his denomination that are reluctant -- even hostile -- to change.

In this Jan. 12, 2017 photo, Attorney General Loretta Lynch poses for a portrait during an interview with The Associated Press at the University of Baltimore School of Law in Baltimore. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

A parting shot at personal freedom

On Jan. 3, outgoing Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch secretly signed an order directing the National Security Agency (NSA) -- America's 60,000-person-strong domestic spying apparatus -- to make available raw spying data to all other federal intelligence agencies, which then can pass it on to their counterparts in foreign countries and in the 50 states upon request.

Ruin often precedes change

After World War II, the two countries whose governments were totally destroyed by the war — Germany and Japan — were the two countries which, upon rebuilding to new order, succeeded best economically.

Obama's betrayal of the Cuban people

I couldn't have imagined that President Obama could do any more harm to the Cuban people before he left office, but I was wrong. With only a week left in his presidency he announced that the long-standing policy of accepting Cubans that flee the Communist island of Cuba by sea -- the policy known as "wet feet, dry feet" -- would change.